The online application for the 2018 Pre-College Programs will be available in December. Please check back or request additional information.

INTENSIVE STUDIES (July 9–27, 2018)

RR | 11–12 | 3-wk Full Day

In this program, students can explore creative ideas, entrepreneurship, and collaboration. This intensive program with the Simon Business School will have students work in teams to create their own business plan while visiting some of the top local businesses for inspiration. Courses in marketing, career prep, and teamwork allow students to explore the world of business, from practicing their pitch to developing a business strategy.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

  • A commuter component is not available.
  • Outline and structure are subject to change at the discretion of the professors.
  • Enrollment is limited; selection for this program is competitive.



INSTRUCTORS: Simon Business School Faculty

RR | 11–12 | 3-wk Full Day

What is pathology? In partnership with the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, this program offers a unique experience exploring the multifaceted discipline of pathology, a cornerstone of modern medicine. Students will get firsthand experience with laboratory processes, organ dissection sessions, independent coursework, and mentoring by a department physician.


COURSE OUTLINE

Anatomic Pathology (AP)
AP focuses on the diagnosis and study of disease through macroscopic and microscopic examination of tissue specimens. Subspecialty areas of AP include Surgical Pathology, Cytopathology, Neuropathology and Autopsy/Forensic Pathology. Students in the Explorations in Pathology program will be introduced to a variety of subspecialties within AP through didactic lectures, case-based presentations, hands-on examination of formalin-preserved human organs, and ‘at-the-microscope’ teaching sessions examining glass slides of normal tissue and disease processes.  

Clinical Pathology/Laboratory Medicine (CP/LM)
Laboratories divisions of CP/LM include Hematopathology, Clinical Chemistry and Toxicology, Microbiology, Molecular Diagnostics, Cytogenetics, and Blood Bank (Transfusion Medicine). Students in the Explorations in Pathology program will be introduced to a variety of subspecialties within CP/LM through didactic lectures, case-based presentations, tours of CP/LM laboratories within Strong Memorial Hospital, and hands-on simulations of laboratory medicine topics.

Students will participate in an independent study project with mentoring by a physician in the Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine.

Students may participate in field-trips to off-site locations to enhance their understanding of Pathology, pending availability.    


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

  • A commuter component is not available.
  • Outline and structure are subject to change at the discretion of the professors.
  • Enrollment is limited; selection for this program is competitive.


 


INSTRUCTORS: Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center Faculty

RR | 11–12 | 3-wk Full Day

Students can develop their independence, eye for invention, and advanced research and problem-solving skills in the Hajim Engineering program. This hands-on engineering program allows students to investigate topics like biomedical engineering, data science, and audio and music engineering, using the vast resources of the Hajim School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.


COURSE OUTLINE

Data Science
In this week-long module, students will have a hands-on opportunity to experience the growing field of data science. After a brief introduction and appreciation on why data science is the most sought-after profession in the 21st century, the students will immerse in analyzing and visualizing a large data set to discover insights using state-of-the-art data science tools. By means of a series of interactive examples in various domain/subject areas, they will gain experience in data science techniques such as data preparation and exploration, data visualization, and an introduction to predictive modeling. The hands-on working sessions will be complemented by tours of university research laboratories engaged in the exciting area of data science.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

  • A commuter component is not available.
  • Outline and structure are subject to change at the discretion of the professors.
  • Enrollment is limited to 20 students; selection for this program is competitive.



INSTRUCTORS:

Stephen Roessner, Audio and Music Engineering 
Stephen is a Grammy Award-winning recording engineer, musician, multi-instrumentalist, and producer. He has toured the world as a drummer for the instrumental rock band, Saxon Shore, and is also very active in the local music scene. He is currently a PhD student in electrical engineering at The University of Rochester and holds a BM in music performance in percussion, a BS in sound recording, and a MSEE in audio signal processing. Stephen’s research interests include acoustics, signal processing, and hardware electronics. He also teaches courses in audio engineering and critical listening at the University. Outside of the University, Stephen owns his own recording studio, Calibrated Recording, and frequently travels to other cities to do on-location recordings.

Scott Seidman, Biomedical Engineering 
Associate professor Scott H. Seidman has been on the faculty of the Biomedical Engineering Department at the University of Rochester since its creation in 2000. His research interests include the detection of motion by the inner ear, and how this information is used by navigational and orientational mechanisms. Scott is co-director of the technology core of the Center for Navigation and Communication Sciences, funded by the National Institute of Deafness and other Communication Disorders, and helps disseminate technological development to other NIDCD cores. He has designed two laboratory-intensive courses, including the BME core course, Quantitative Physiology. He also co-teaches the year-long undergraduate senior design sequence.

Scott’s engineering background is in bioinstrumentation and embedded devices. He has applied this expertise as co-inventor on two patent applications for medical devices, both in the area of neonatal monitoring. One of these devices comes directly out of a BME senior design project, and he shares inventorship with four alumni of our design program and two UR neonatologists. Another area of interest is assistive technology to help people with profound accessibility issues use computers.

He served as director of an international design educational initiative funded by the National Collegiate Inventors and Innovators Alliance in which students and faculty traveled between the University of Rochester and Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú (PUCP) in Lima to identify global health needs of developing nations that could be addressed by the design programs of both schools. Seidman serves as the faculty advisor of the University of Rochester chapter of Engineers Without Borders.

Ajay Anand, Data Science 

RR | 11–12 | 3-wk Full Day

This unique and selective program is open to students interested in pursuing careers in medicine. This rigorous program offers research labs, rotations, and service learning. You will get firsthand experience with the clinical, community service, and public health aspects of medicine, getting a real taste of the medical school experience.


COURSE OUTLINE

Anatomy and Physiology
Introduce students to anatomy through models and human organs (plastinated and embalmed organs).
Topics include: Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology, The Heart, Respiratory System, Muscular System, Nervous System

Neurology/Psychiatry
Designed to give students an understanding of the structure and function of the brain. Students will gain insight into the brain through dissection and prosection, and learn about various psychiatric disorders.
Topics include: Introduction to Neurology and Psychology, Anatomy and Psychology of the Brain

Public Health
Designed to introduce students to public health history, concepts, and contemporary issues. This week will examine Public Health via a tour of Mt. Hope Cemetery, and will include presentations and a poster session.
Topics include: History of Public Health, Public Health Disparities (health and wealth, social justice), Current Issues in Public Health (lead poisoning, tobacco, obesity, clean water/air, health systems/reforms), Global Health Issues (globalization and development, maternal/child health)

Other Activities
Standardized Patient Session, Learning to Take Vital Signs, Suture Session, Taping and Casting, Simulation Exercises (Cardiac, OB/GYN, Intubations, Phlebotomy), ED Rotation, Shadowing a Physician, Wilderness Medicine



ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

  • A commuter component is not available.
  • Outline and structure are subject to change at the discretion of the professors.
  • Enrollment is limited to 30 students; selection for this program is competitive.



INSTRUCTORS: University of Rochester Medical Center Faculty

RO | 11–12 | 3-wk Full Day

This in-depth workshop recaptures some of the magic, fun, and rigor of the art of movie-making and introduces students to old (16 mm black and white film stock, 1980s VCR cameras) and new (Vine, iMovie) traditions of short film-making. Through experiential activities like visiting the world-renowned George Eastman House of Film and Photography, students will plunge headfirst into an intimate relationship with the art of short visual storytelling.


TOPICS COVERED*

*Outline and structure are subject to change at the discretion of the professors.

  • Principles of narrative, documentary, and experimental film making
  • The materiality of film
  • Basic cinematography, including the framing and lighting of a shot
  • Purchasing and caring for film stock
  • How to load and operate a Bolex camera
  • Film processing, digital transfer, and the lab
  • Cutting/splicing film and projection


OTHER ACTIVITIES

  • Exercises where we shoot footage of Rochester landmarks, including Mt. Hope Cemetery, the Kodak Building, and High Falls
  • Learning how to best submit films to festivals
  • Seeing how film is manufactured
  • Visiting the world-renowned George Eastman House of Film and Photography, and interacting with their film restoration specialists
  • Class visits by filmmakers



INSTRUCTOR: TBD


ROCHESTER SCHOLARS: SESSION A (July 9–20, 2018)

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

Learning about bones, muscles, joints, and movement has never been more fun! Through movement, poetry, and numerous hands-on activities, you will identify and explore the function of muscles and bones in your body. No dry memorization here; you will plunge into the subject of anatomy by putting those bones and muscles into action. Specially designed kinesthetic activities will embody these lessons. This class is perfect for you if you’re interested in health sciences, biology, kinesiology, physical therapy, dance, or massage therapy.



INSTRUCTOR: Anne Harris Wilcox
Anne Harris Wilcox MFA, is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Rochester, and the former President of the New York State Dance Education Association (President, 2012–2015). She is a NYS permanently certified K-12 dance educator and the Artistic Director of the Present Tense Dance Company, which she founded in 1991. Anne’s teaching interests include interdisciplinary studies, K-12 pedagogy, choreography, technique, and anatomy. In 2013, Anne created, Active Learning Games, LLC, designing and producing kinesthetic educational activities and products for grades K-12 and university.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

We live in a world connected by technology. This course will focus on the technology that interconnects the entire world through the Internet. You will explore the protocol that allows the Internet to work: TCP/IP. And on a much smaller scale, you’ll explore how information is transmitted across wired and wireless local area networks using the 802.3 and 802.11 standards. You will learn about switches and routers, the Cisco IOS, how to configure and connect those devices through hands-on and virtual simulation exercises. Upon completion, you will have a fundamental understanding of computer networking and the protocols that make it all work and will have the knowledge to pursue the Cisco CCENT certification.



INSTRUCTOR: Garret Arcoraci
After 17 years at Xerox Corporation, Garret decided to pursue a career in education. After graduation, he was asked by one of his professors to adjunct for evening classes; through this experience, he discovered how much he enjoys teaching and how rewarding it can be. Two years later, he was fortunate enough to accept his current position as a lecturer in the college of Information Sciences and Technology at RIT.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

This two-week session will provide many hands-on activities tied to taking a trip through different regions and landmarks in China. Starting from Beijing, the students will enjoy train rides and explore the different regions, scenery, and the history of China. Wherever the students go they will greet people, check their schedules/train timetables, and buy tickets. They will also order food/drinks and express their likes/dislikes about food/drinks. Authentic materials will be used and members of the local Chinese community will assist with hands-on activities, such as music, dance, food, games, etc. In addition to Chinese language learning and cultural exploration, students will understand the important aspects of Chinese cultures, gain an increased appreciation of how languages and cultures differ, and learn to become global citizens.


INSTRUCTOR: GuoMing Tian
Ms. Tian is a dedicated, professional teacher with strong technology skills, effective teaching strategies, and a proven record in diverse environments. She is a native Chinese, speaks fluent Japanese, and has taught Chinese for over 20 years. Currently, she is teaching at University of Rochester, RIT, and the Chinese School of Rochester. She has developed and taught several college level courses, including a Chinese culture course and a Chinese for Science and Technology course.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

Do you want to learn why light behaves the way it does? Do you want to play with some sweet lasers? In this course you will learn to operate lasers safely and then use them in enriching laboratory exercises to explore the properties of light. Some of these properties include polarization, where you will learn how 3D movies are made, and interference, where you will build a Michelson interferometer capable of measuring distances on the order of nanometers. The lab skills you pick up in this course will also make you a valuable resource for any optics internship or research group you pursue in the future. A good understanding of high school geometry will be required to fully participate.



Learn more by viewing the video: Optics

INSTRUCTORS:

Ashan Ariywansa
Ashan Ariywansa is a third year Ph.D. student at the Institute of Optics, University of Rochester and has been involved in teaching as a TA for two years at the institute. He has been a part of many outreach activities carried out by the SPIE student chapter at the University of Rochester

Gregory Jenkins
Greg Jenkins is currently completing his Ph.D. in Optics at the University of Rochester. He has a BS in Physics from the Colorado School of Mines and Optics experience from research at Wright Patterson Air Force Base. He is also a huge fan of skiing.

Kevin Liang

RO | 11–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

This two-week course will provide a practical overview of desirable skills for proactive engagement with college life. Our approach will employ small group collaborative learning discussions based on selected questions and readings. In addition to daily assignments, small student groups will choose a topic to research and present to their peers at the course’s end. Leadership skills and topics will include: diversity, small group facilitation, emotional intelligence, time management, generational etiquette, financial foresight, health and nutrition, self-advocacy, conflict resolution, how to mentor and be mentored, and leadership practice.

*Open to rising 11th and 12th-grade students only.


INSTRUCTOR: Terry Platt 
Professor Terry Platt grew up in Chicago, and was educated at Swarthmore College and the University of Chicago (B.S. Math). He taught Math and Physics in Tanzania for 2 years in the Peace Corps, and was an Outward Bound Instructor at the Kilimanjaro school for 3 weeks during this time. His graduate work at Harvard in the Dept. of Molecular Biology & Biochemistry was followed by a 3 year postdoctoral position at Stanford in the Biology Dept. and he then joined the Yale faculty in the Dept. of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology. After 10 years, he moved to the University of Rochester, where he has been since; with the members of his research laboratory and academic colleagues he has co-authored over 100 scientific papers, reviews, and invited book chapters. Beginning in 1999 he actively helped develop the U of R Workshop Program and for the past 12 years has been Co-Director of the Center for Workshop Education (in CETL) to train undergraduates as Workshop Leaders. Since 2014 he has served as Mentor for the first Posse cohort at the U of R, is a Leadership Coach certified by the International Coach Federation, and served for 9 years on the Board of Trustees of the Harley School in Rochester. He values fostering leadership and mentoring skills among young people; his particular passion is for overlooked and underrepresented groups. He is an avid swimmer, loves music and theater, and in his free time likes to cook, bicycle, hike and participate in outdoor activities; a favorite quote is “talent is everywhere, opportunity is not”.

RO | 11–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

Was there life on Mars? Is there life on Mars now? Could there be life on Mars in the future?  Acting as interplanetary scientists, we will investigate all three of these questions by first understanding the conditions necessary for life on Earth and the technology needed to detect life on a planet far, far away. We will use real astronomical data to explore geology and planetary conditions of Mars in the past and the present. With excerpts from Andy Weir’s book “The Martian” (2011) along with the 2015 movie counterpart, we will discuss the advancement of exploration of other planets and the possibility of sustaining human life on Mars in the future.


INSTRUCTOR: Emily Wilson
Emily Wilson is a Ph.D. student at Rochester Institute of Technology in the Astrophysical Sciences and Technology program. She is passionate about education, believing that astrophysics education can be accessible to everyone. Her astrophysical interests are focused around observational research.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

Imagine being a lawyer, assigned to your first big case—and it’s a homicide! Whether you’re the prosecutor or defense attorney, you have a big job ahead of you. The defendant’s fate is, in many ways, in your hands. How will you prepare your case? Gather evidence? Prepare witnesses? Are there specific procedures you’ll need to use in the courtroom? How do real attorneys prepare and try their cases? In this course, you’ll work as a team to learn about basic criminal trial procedures and eventually prepare and present a mock murder trial. Most importantly, through planning, strategizing, and arguing, you’ll learn that trial lawyers live and work in an exciting world.


INSTRUCTOR: Dave Caiazza
Dave Caiazza is a retired City School District teacher. He taught high school Criminology classes for over 10 years there. Though not a lawyer, he has many connections with the police and legal communities and meets with convicted killers at Attica Prison each year. He is currently an adjunct professor of adolescent education at Nazareth College. He has enjoyed teaching “May It Please the Court” at Rochester Scholars for several years.

RO | 11–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

Interested in the new developments of stem cell research? This course will introduce you to basic principles in stem cell science, highlight the role of stem cell dysfunction in disease, and discuss the potential therapeutic applications of stem cells. Additional topics will include the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and gene engineering. You will experience first hand what it takes to grow embryonic stem cells and how to manipulate and analyze them using gene transfer and immunofluorsecent technology. During the course, you will also visit the University of Rochester cGMP stem cell laboratory. Please note that all students must complete a lab safety training course for handling bio-safety level 2 reagents.



INSTRUCTOR: Chris Proschel 
Dr. Chris Proschel is an associate professor in the Department of Biomedical Genetics and acting director of the University of Rochester pluripotent stem cell laboratory. As a neurobiologist, Dr. Proschel is using embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells to study the role of astrocytes in diseases of the brain, such as Vanishing White Matter diseases and Parkinson’s Disease. By exploiting new stem cell technologies, his lab is also developing cell therapeutic approaches that use astrocytes, a specific type of glial cell, for the treatment of traumatic and degenerative diseases of the brain. The Proschel lab is part of the University of Rochester Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Institute.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

For more than a hundred years, movies and other visual media have shocked audiences, moved them to tears, and transfixed them in philosophical contemplation. But why do visual media affect us so powerfully? In this course, you will explore the forms, functions, and history of cinematic language. You’ll watch, analyze, and discuss classics like Citizen Kane (1941), Psycho (1960), and The Shining (1980), contemporary blockbusters like The Matrix (1999) and The Dark Knight (2008), television shows like Breaking Bad (2008–2013) and Arrested Development (2003–2005, 2013), and assorted music videos and commercials. In a “capstone” project, you will analyze a short scene from a visual object of your choosing. By learning why moviemakers use visual language, you will gain a richer appreciation for visual media.


INSTRUCTOR: Daniel Singleton
Dan has been a self-proclaimed movie nut for more than a decade. After graduating from Kennesaw State University in 2011, he enrolled at the University of Rochester to pursue his MA in English and Film (which he completed in 2012) and a PhD in the same subjects (in progress). He has taught with the Pre-College Program for three summers, and he has also taught college courses at St. John Fisher College and the University of Rochester.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

As seen through the eyes of an actual participant, history comes alive in this American military science course. This course will cover strategies, battles, twists, turns, surprises, and details not gone over in a typical history class. Fort Ticonderoga, Saratoga, Bulge, Vietnam, and Persian Gulf are just a few of the battles that may be covered. History pivots on battles—come join us in this call to arms!



INSTRUCTOR: William Dykstra
William teaches physics and astronomy at a local school district. He has certifications in physics with a Masters in Education. William has a deep passion and interest for physics, astronomy, sports, music, military and history. It is the latter on which he decided to create this uniquely styled course.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

What’s it like to be a physician? What does it take to become a doctor? Meet with practicing physicians, medical students, and other experts. Explore hands-on medical procedures, examine equipment, and discuss medical ethics and the role of the physician. Learn what it takes, academically, to prepare for medical school, and how to decide if medicine is the right path for you. Examine the current pros and cons of being a doctor.

*Please note: A $25 lab fee applies.



INSTRUCTOR: University of Rochester Medical Center Faculty

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

Competition is everywhere! Students face competitive situations in the classroom, on stage auditioning for musical, dance, or theatrical performances, on the sports field, and in the process of applying for college. Whether you thrive on competition, you don’t want to choke under the pressure, or you are just curious about psychological research, this course is for you! This course offers insights into psychology of competition and tips from the experts on how to perform your best. In this course, you will learn about psychological science and what this research reveals about competitive fire, the home field advantage, emotions involved in competition, the downfalls of focusing too much on your competitors, and more! Additionally, we will analyze the motivation from video clips of real-world athletes and performers, learn ways to handle stress, and practice techniques to avoid choking under pressure.


INSTRUCTOR: Emily Hangen
Emily Hangen is a National Science Foundation Fellow, a Robert L. and Mary L. Sproull University Fellow, and a graduate student pursuing her PhD in social psychology at the University of Rochester. Her research interests focus on motivation during competition and optimizing students’ academic motivation and achievement. To assess motivation and performance outcomes, her research applies both traditional self-report measures along with autonomic physiological indices. She has experience as a university course instructor, university teaching assistant, and tutor.  

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

GirlsGetMath@Rochester encourages young women to explore, and invites them to excel in, the mathematical sciences. Accomplished professional women enthusiastic about serving as career models as well as scientific mentors lead the program. Potential topics include cryptography, the mathematics of voting, image processing, prime numbers and factoring, and fractals. 


PROGRAM GOALS

  • Show high school women that the study of mathematics can be exciting, beautiful, and useful
  • Build confidence in students’ mathematical knowledge through engaging and expert mathematical instruction
  • Introduce high school students to a variety of career opportunities in which sophisticated mathematical ability plays a key role
  • Emphasize the strategic role mathematics plays for success in STEM careers
  • Provide participants with a support group and expert mentors who are successful undergraduates, graduate students, postdocs, and professionals from the STEM workforce
  • Have a positive influence on the way students view their mathematical interest and ability



INSTRUCTOR: Amanda Tucker 
Amanda Tucker is on the faculty at the University of Rochester in the Department of Mathematics and has a longstanding interest in working with and encouraging high school students to get and stay interested in mathematics.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

Are you a rising high school junior or senior? Thinking about colleges and careers, and maybe internships? Do you want to answer career goal and potential college major questions articulately, and confidently? ICAN training prepares you to transform Internship, Career, Admissions and Networking efforts into “I did” outcomes. Complete career exploration and goal expression, as well as college targeting, and admissions essay writing exercises. Interpret Strong Interest Inventory results to accelerate career exploration, majors and careers connections, and admissions progress. Begin a portfolio that includes resumes, cover letters, networking notes, and essays. Learn to network for information and for consideration, and about shadowing, internships and cyber sleuthing techniques. Written guides and take home exercises will compose a comprehensive set of materials to use during the ten-day course and after, when the ICAN bootcamp is completed.


INSTRUCTOR: Burton Nadler 
The “drill instructor” Burt Nadler was director of the Career and Internship Center at University of Rochester from 1998 through 2015 and is now Educator Relations Director of Dream Careers (www.summerinternships.com) a preeminent global internship and experiential education program. For those he teaches, coaches and counsels processes become easy to follow behavioral steps and easy to accept motivational attitudes, acronyms and alliterations. Posting, Places, People, Program and Project driven strategies facilitated outcomes for students and alumni. Field, Function and Firm focused answers to career goal and major queries and finding role models, mentors and advocates who CARES (who offer Consideration, Advice, Referrals, Education and Support) generate readiness for Internship, Career, Admissions and Networking success (with ICAN strategies being translated into I did outcomes). Burt has taught ICAN courses targeting college as well as high school students and regularly teaches a Career Counseling course to mental health counseling graduate students as well.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

This course is for you if you’re interested in Japanese language through not only traditional Japanese culture but also anime, movies, food, and more! In an age where international relations is crucial to economic growth and homeland security, being bilingual can open doors to many high-profile job opportunities. As the relationship between the United States and Japan strengthens, the need to learn Japanese becomes greater. In this course, you will learn how to construct Japanese sentences and carry on simple conversations with others in Japanese. You will also have opportunities to experience interesting hands-on cultural activities. The class will watch Japanese films and anime every day to check grammar and help you learn authentic daily vocabulary.


INSTRUCTOR: Shizuka Hardy
Shizuka is a Senior Lecturer in Japanese for the department of Modern Languages and Cultures. She has been teaching conversational courses for intermediate and advanced level since 2011. She has also taught Elementary Japanese from the fall of 2014. Shizuka is experienced in teaching all levels, from high school students who are interested in Japanese language and culture to business people who are planning to go on a business trip to Japan.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

This problem-solving course will introduce you to medical science and pathology and you’ll solve a series of medical cases. We will explore a series of diseases and learn to think through a differential diagnosis. The structure of the course will involve short interactive lectures followed by participation in case studies employing the problem-based-learning process used in many medical schools.



Learn more by viewing the video: Medical Mysteries


INSTRUCTOR: University of Rochester Medical Center Faculty

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

In this course, you will develop the analytical skills necessary to discuss, analyze, and contextualize music in all forms. From Stravinsky’s riot inducing Rite of Spring to Jimi Hendrix’s polemic Woodstock rendition of the Star Spangled Banner, this class moves through a vast survey of music that touches on each major era in the canon of Western music. Scandal, intellectual debate, and even murder are topics at hand! Course content is built primarily on readings, listening activities, and group discussions, all employed to cover the historical context, technological advancements, stylistic trends, and analytical processes employed by the composer. Additionally, this class will take a visit to EARS (the Eastman Audio and Research Studios) to get a demo of the studio and see where the contemporary composer works.


 

INSTRUCTOR: Miles Friday
Born in Seattle, WA., Miles Jefferson Friday is currently pursuing an MA in composition at the Eastman School of Music where he studies with primarily with Ricardo Zohn-Muldoon. Miles has won numerous awards and honors including the ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Award, the Kuttner String Quartet Composition Competition, a Hutton Honors College College Creative Grant, the Robert Avalon Young Composer Competition, and the Dallas Festival of Modern Music Emerging Composer Award. Holding a BM from the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, Miles has studied composition with Don Freund, Sven David Sandstrom, Aaron Travers, P.Q. Phan, and Claude Baker in addition to spending additional time at IRCAM as part of their manifeste academie.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

Hemingway’s shortest story: “For sale: baby shoes, never worn.” In 21st Century, stories have gotten shorter. Flash Fiction is a celebrated form that finds its way in magazines and collections. Using all contemporary writers, this course will discuss what makes flash fiction different and what makes it similar to the short story and the prose poem. We will read stories, analyze them, and discuss their merits and pitfalls. While we dive into reading, we will also hone our craft as creative writers. Starting from the ground up, we will work through brainstorming methods, initial drafting and revising, peer work-shopping, to a finished product you can share with the entire class.


INSTRUCTOR: Zachary Powell 
Zachary Powell has taught high school for seven years and at the college level for three. During this time, he taught speech, film,
academic and creative writing, and reading. Currently, Zachary is a Ph.D. student in Film, a writing consultant in Rochester’s writing center, and introduce films at the Dryden Theater.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

For over a hundred years, animation has amused, fascinated, and moved viewers, producing some of the most successful films of all time. Yet, animation remains marginalized within the study of film. Through an examination of popular animated films such as Toy Story, Ghost in the Shell, Akira, and Spirited Away, this course brings animation to the center of film studies, analyzing its particular style, form, and aesthetics. It will introduce the basic concepts of film analysis with a focus on animation. While analyzing animation’s aesthetics, we will also attend to the mode’s treatment of class, gender, and race, paying close attention to the historical and cultural context in which the film emerged. Films discussed include works by Cohl, Disney, Jones, Bakshi, Shirow, and Miyazaki.


INSTRUCTOR: Patrick Sullivan 
Patrick is a Ph.D. candidate in the Visual and Cultural Studies department. He graduated from George Mason University with an BA in English, focusing on film and media studies. Patrick’s research interests include film philosophy, globalization, cinematic representation of space and time, Thai cinema, early cinema, and film sound.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

Life is stressful! Come learn all about how our bodies and minds react to stress and how to manage it through this hands-on course! We’ll start by talking about the role of stress in your life, then gain a better understanding of the physiological and psychological bases of stress, and finish with interactive workshops on how to reduce stress in your daily life. Through this course, you will learn how to trace the stress response from a stressor in your environment (e.g., an upcoming college application deadline) to your brain’s neurological response, to your body’s fight or flight reaction. We will also debunk the myth that stress is purely negative by learning about ways to use stress to your advantage! Finally, we will learn about easy stress-management techniques, which will include going into the community to meet with experts on how to use mindfulness and yoga techniques to reduce stress and anxiety.


INSTRUCTOR: Jessica Keith 
Jessica Keith is a graduate student pursuing her PhD in Clinical Psychology at the University of Rochester. Her research focuses on how stress impacts academic and social functioning in children and adolescents. She has clinical and teaching experience working with undergraduate students at the University of Rochester, including through working as a therapist at the University Counseling Center and as a teaching assistant for several undergraduate psychology courses.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

Models organisms are powerful genetic tools widely used in modern biomedical research. In this course, the students will use the Drosophila melanogaster fruitfly and the Caenorhabditis elegans nematode to review basic principles of genetics and explore cutting-edge genetic approaches used in these models. The concepts and topics covered will include: classical genetics, including forward and reverse genetic screens, and modern genetic approaches, such as RNA interference (RNAi), in vivo analysis of gene expression, and the creation of transgenic animals. Students will experience hand-on how to (i) map the fly genome using recombination, (ii) screen for developmental phenotypes in worms using RNAi technology, (iii) analyze gene expression in vivo in worms using a transgenic reporter and (iv) manipulate gene expression in an organ- or cell-specific manner in Drosophila. Finally, the course will challenge the classical concept of genotype-to-phenotype and discuss uses of model organisms in the most innovative biomedical research.


INSTRUCTOR: Benoit Biteau 
Drs. Biteau and Samuelson are geneticists who study development, stem cell biology and aging using Drosophila and C.elegans as experimental models.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

You are likely reading this paragraph on the internet. Take a look around this webpage, the navigation, the layout, the search bar: it was all built by a web developer. This crash course will equip you with the foundational knowledge and hands-on practice that every budding web developer must acquire to build sites such as the one you are using right now. You will learn about client-side scripting and markup languages (HTML, CSS/Bootstrap, JavaScript/jQuery), a server-side framework (Python/Flask), and how these technologies communicate via the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP). Once you have completed the course, you will have enough leverage to begin working toward a career, degree, or hobby in web development.


INSTRUCTOR: Joseph VanderStel 
Joseph VanderStel is an Eastman School graduate student in music theory by day, freelance guitarist and web developer by night. As a theorist, he draws inspiration from questions related to cognition, style, and improvisation, with a focus on jazz and American popular music. As a developer, he is partnering with local entrepreneurs to build an online platform for music theory learning, and has designed several web-based tools for music teachers. Joseph is also an instructor in Eastman’s Institute for Music Leadership, where he offers a course on web design.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

Do the wealthy owe something to the poor? Is war ever justified? Should colleges use race as a factor in admissions decisions? Most of us have an opinion, and are excited to defend it, in these sorts of provocative ethical dilemmas. That excitement will be the fuel for this course, but is every opinion equally sound? To find out, students will use research, philosophical texts, reasoning, conversation, and congenial argument to meticulously examine a variety of contemporary ethical issues. The aim is to give students a taste of the rigorous thought that goes into modern philosophical analyses of these issues, and to provoke students to develop their own thoughtful views. What is the right thing to do? Come to class to find out!


INSTRUCTOR: Zachary Barber 
Zachary is a graduate student in the philosophy Ph.D. program at the University of Rochester. He studies ethics and philosophy of education, and is passionate about teaching philosophy. Last summer, Zachary taught an ethics course to high school students in rural Mississippi, and he hopes to bring some of his experience there to the Pre-College Programs at the University of Rochester!

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

What’s it like to be a physician? What does it take to become a doctor? Meet with practicing physicians, medical students, and other experts. Explore hands-on medical procedures, examine equipment, and discuss medical ethics and the role of the physician. Learn what it takes, academically, to prepare for medical school, and how to decide if medicine is the right path for you. Examine the current pros and cons of being a doctor.

*Please note: A $25 lab fee applies.



INSTRUCTOR: University of Rochester Medical Center Faculty


ROCHESTER SCHOLARS: SESSION B (July 23–27, 2018)

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30am-11:30am

Interested in learning how babies are really made? This course will introduce students to the science of reproduction through in-vitro fertilization. Students will learn about gamete (egg and sperm) development, fertilization, embryo development, implantation and early pregnancy. Students will get hands on experience with cryopreservation of sperm or embryos. We will also debate the ethics and explore biomedical careers in embryology and lab technology.

*Completion of a high school biology course is required.


INSTRUCTOR: Shrenik Shah
Shrenik Shah is associate faculty member of Dept. OBGYN/Reproductive Endocrinology. He is working in In Vitro Fertilization aspect for more than 9 years. Daily routine for him as Embryologist he perform various micromanipulations technique like Intra Cytoplasmic Sperm Injection, Embryo Biopsy and Cryopreservation. With this cutting edge technologies and skills his lab is helping cancer patients who want to have their family in future and couples who are facing difficulties to build their own family. 

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30am-11:30am

Through stimulating lectures, interactive labs, and informative field trips, this class introduces you to the many disciplines of engineering. You will get an overview of the necessary tools for analysis and problem solving and will use your creativity, energy, and interpersonal skills while participating in several in-class design projects. Additionally, you will learn the importance of mathematics, science, and technology in everyday engineering situations. By the end of the course, you will have a better-defined idea of engineering, its requirements, and your options for a future within this field.



INSTRUCTOR: TBD

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30am–11:30am

This course will introduce the student to the Raspberry Pi. Devices are increasingly becoming smaller while simultaneously becoming more powerful, allowing the end-user to do more with them. One such device is the Raspberry Pi, which is slightly larger than a credit card but powerful enough to do many of the things people do with a desktop computer, like word processing, games, and even using it as a multimedia device for your television. Through hands-on exercises, students will learn about the Linux operating system, programming using Python, and will install Minecraft and discover many of the other capabilities of the Raspberry Pi.

*Please note: A $25 lab fee applies.


INSTRUCTOR: Garret Arcoraci 
After 17 years at Xerox Corporation, Garret decided to pursue a career in education. After graduation, he was asked by one of his professors to adjunct for evening classes; through this experience, he discovered how much he enjoys teaching and how rewarding it can be. Two years later, he was fortunate enough to accept his current position as a lecturer in the college of Information Sciences and Technology at RIT. 

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 9:00 am–12:00 pm

Pharmacology is a real world application in a variety of medical careers such as anesthesiology, psychiatry, physicians, pharmacists, etc. In small working groups of students we will use web-based tools to conduct guided research into the chemical nature of select drug categories, and the mechanism(s) by which the respective drugs interact with biological systems and modify human physiology. This class is designed for 11-12 grade students only with a good foundation of biology and chemistry.


INSTRUCTOR: Jeffrey Purkerson 
Jeff Purkerson, Ph.D. has a doctorate in Pharmacology from the University of Virginia.  Dr. Purkerson has conducted research in the fields of immune-inflammatory mechanisms and renal physiology for over 30 years.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

Are you ready to explore the virtual world of game design? This course provides an overview of mobile gaming development using GameSalad Creator. Topics covered include: history of the mobile game industry, mobile platforms, tools and genres; design, art and programming for mobile devices; ICloud integration; production team roles, responsibilities and cycles; play testing; Xcode integration; virtual goods; analytics; storyboarding; accelerometer response; user interface design; level layout; multiplayer integration; social media notifications and the future of the mobile game industry



INSTRUCTOR: Aaron Frohm
Aaron Frohm is a technology education teacher at Pittsford Mendon High School. He graduated from SUNY Oswego in 2013 with a Bachelor’s in Technology Education and is currently working towards his Master’s at RIT. Aaron has taught pre-engineering courses, game development, graphic design, transportation, and photography. Each year he looks forward to new opportunities to expand learning in the classroom for students in all of his classes.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

Music and mathematics are often said to “go well together,” but how exactly might they be related? In this course, we will discuss three primary strategies through which both scholars and musicians have related music and mathematics over the last 3,000 years. First, we will discuss how the mathematical foundations of sound relate to the basic materials of music. Second, we will discuss composers who use various mathematical patterns to structure their music. Finally, we will
discuss how scholars have used mathematical structures to understand and theorize about music. This course will not require mathematics beyond high school algebra, although basic trigonometry and the ability to read music are both helpful. More advanced topics in mathematics and music theory will be introduced as needed.


INSTRUCTOR: Noah Kahrs 
Originally from Pittsburgh, Noah Kahrs is a first-year graduate student in Composition at the Eastman School of Music, having previously studied music and mathematics at the University of Chicago. In his spare time, he can be found staring out windows, ringing large bells, or searching for domes, highway overpasses, and other spaces with interesting acoustic properties.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

Nursing is the largest workforce in the health care setting. The roles that nurses fulfill in the hospital, public health, research, and advanced practice roles are vital to the success of a patient’s health. This course will show you what it takes to be a nurse. With engaging discussions and interactive exercises, you will learn about the profession’s foundations and specialties, the history and future of nursing, and potential careers that might interest you. Come explore if nursing is for you.



Learn more by viewing the video: Nursing – Is It In Your Future?


INSTRUCTOR: Katharine Hiltunen
Kathy Hiltunen currently teaches in the Masters in Health Care program at the URMC School of Nursing. Prior to that she helped create and then teach in taught at RIT in the Masters in Health Administration program for 10 years. Clinically, Kathy has practiced both as a public health nurse and more recently school nurse. She also worked for 27 years at Excellus BCBS in various leadership roles, overseeing case management, disease management, and utilization management programs.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

In this course, you will learn about the fundamental particles and forces that make up the universe and you will conduct experiments to observe these forces in action. You’ll get an introduction to basic concepts in quantum mechanics, high-energy physics, astrophysics, and cosmology, and simple computer programming and data analysis. In conjunction with the lectures, you will observe local and astrophysical sources of high-energy particles using a cloud chamber and will construct a detector to measure the lifetime of the fundamental particle known as the muon. Knowledge of algebra is required, but prior knowledge of programming is not.


INSTRUCTOR: Segev BenZvi
Segev is an assistant professor of physics at the University of Rochester who is interested in the origin of high-energy particles from beyond the solar system. His work takes him to remote but beautiful high-altitude deserts and mountaintops, which are optimal locations for building astrophysical particle detectors. He has a BA in physics from the University of Chicago, a PhD from Columbia University, and he worked as a research scientist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

Jump into the world of crime scene investigation (CSI) as you study how to process evidence from a homicide. During the investigation, you will study fingerprints, hairs, fibers, powders, and fur to determine the perpetrator of this ultimate whodunit. Throughout this intense week, you will familiarize yourself with the scientific method, microscopes, teamwork, and lab safety. Your group will work diligently to find the killer by the end of the week.


INSTRUCTOR: Dennis Mucenski
Dennis was destined to become a forensics teacher from the first time he watched Law and Order and then CSI. He developed a forensics class at Pittsford Mendon High School and then started co-teaching a forensics course for teachers at College of the Atlantic. He is a published author, does webinars for Ward’s Natural Science, and a three-day conference on how to incorporate forensics into school curricula each July. Dennis also teaches an undergrad and graduate course on the science of crime scene investigation at St. John Fisher College.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

Students will soar through space as they dive into a full-bodied contemporary dance technique class.  They will examine dance concepts influenced by Laban/Bartenieff theories and eclectic contemporary and modern dance influences. Through embodying fun and challenging choreographic combinations, classes will explore patterns of total body connectivity, efficiency of movement, use of momentum, musculo-skeletal anatomy, rhythm and somatic practices to develop and improve self-awareness and technical skills. Students will also investigate individual expression in performance and will have an opportunity to perform themselves.


INSTRUCTOR: Missy Pfohl Smith 
Missy Pfohl Smith (MFA) is a choreographer, performer and collaborative artist who directs the Program of Dance and Movement at University of Rochester and is artistic director for the contemporary repertory company, BIODANCE, based in Rochester, NY. Her work has sold out shows at Rochester Fringe for four years, having been called “Gorgeous…astonishing…exceptional” and “a brilliantly crafted world of beauty, melody and calmness” by Rochester City News. She enjoys creating site specific work and is recently completed her second evening length show crafted for a 4 story planetarium in collaboration with a media artist, dancers, musicians and a visual artist. Missy’s viola and dance work with Bridget Kinneary is expanding to include new contemporary compositions by internationally known composers. Her choreography, performance and teaching has spanned across the US and internationally, most recently in Scotland, Greece and Finland. She is certified in Bill Evans Laban/Bartenieff-based pedagogy (BETI) and teaches choreography, dance on camera and contemporary dance and social justice, and more.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

This course is intended to serve as an introduction to Chemistry topics through a hands-on and laboratory-based learning experience. Students will partake in a variety both intellectually and aesthetically engaging experiments and chemical demonstrations throughout the course of the week. There will be a 60-minute lecture/recitation, followed by 2-hour laboratory/experimentation period, designated for experiential learning. The course is designed to transcend the traditional in-class learning experience, as students will be encouraged to developing a chemistry “lens,” as the cool chemistry experiments and demonstrations will be evaluated at the molecular level!


INSTRUCTOR: Shukree Abdul-Rashad 
Shukree Abdul-Rashed is from Lockport, NY and received his BA in Chemistry from University at Buffalo. At UB, Shukree worked under department chair, Dr. Michael Detty, in which he partook in the design, synthesis and optimization of chalcogenopyrylium dyes for use as surface-enhanced resonant Raman scattering reporters. Shukree is a recipient of University of Rochester’s Sherman-Clarke Fellowship and is currently working on methodology for the Lewis Acid-Initiated Alkynyl Halo-Prins reaction and its applications to natural product synthesis. In his spare time, Shukree enjoys sleeping, weightlifting, spending time with his family as well as cooking various Indian/Pakistani cuisines. Most notably, Shukree also takes pleasure in showcasing his NBA-caliber talent on Saturday mornings in which he destroys the departmental fellas in pickup basketball.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

This class introduces the many disciplines of finance, what to expect during academic training at a university level, and potential career paths. Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be an investment banker, a financial advisor, or a private equity, hedge fund, or real estate investor? Examine the pros and cons of various career paths within the world of finance. Learn about different types of investments, build your own hypothetical investment portfolio, speak with professionals in the industry, and more. This class will also introduce several aspects of personal finance (things we wish we thought about when entering college).


INSTRUCTORS:

Jake Conway
Jake has served as Manager of Investment Research at the University of Rochester since December 2013, helping manage the endowment and sourcing new investment ideas/managers. Priro, he worked for Ashford Advisors, LLC, a multi-family investment office, as an Investment Analyst tasked with identifying best-in-class investment managers across asses classes (2010–2013). Jake holds a B.A. in Corporate Finance from St. John Fisher College and is a CFA Charterholder.

Rob Rahbari
Rob has served as an Investment Officer at the University of Rochester since 2013, helping manage the endowment. Prior, he helped manage client assets in J.P. Morgan’s Private Bank (2010–2013); helped analyze investment managers at two different funds-of-hedge funds (2004-2009); led business development efforts for a startup software company (2000–2003) and represented investment management firms as an attorney at Skadden Arps and Weil Gotshal (1996-2000 and 2003-2004). Rob holds a Juris Doctorate from University of Chicago and a BA from University of Michigan.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

This course covers what you will not learn in traditional science and history courses. You will see how science (primarily physics, chemistry, etc.) influenced the years during and surrounding the Second World War. Intentionally or accidentally, history pivots on scientific achievements and breakthroughs, from the famous experiments to the little known. From all perspectives (Axis and Allied powers, civilians, and military), physics and chemistry played a major role in the development of WWII. You will never view science and life the same way again. Basic algebra skills may be used occasionally.

INSTRUCTOR: William Dykstra
William teaches physics and astronomy at a local school district. He has certifications in physics with a Masters in Education. William has a deep passion and interest for physics, astronomy, sports, music, military and history. It is the latter on which he decided to create this uniquely styled course.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

What’s it like to be a physician? What does it take to become a doctor? Meet with practicing physicians, medical students, and other experts. Explore hands-on medical procedures, examine equipment, and discuss medical ethics and the role of the physician. Learn what it takes, academically, to prepare for medical school, and how to decide if medicine is the right path for you. Examine the current pros and cons of being a doctor.

*Please note: A $25 lab fee applies.



INSTRUCTORS: University of Rochester Medical Center Faculty

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

Perhaps you know how to make 3 dozen cookies. How would you make 300,000? Or 3 million? This introduction to chemical engineering will expose the unfamiliar to the knowledge base and skill set that trained chemical engineers take into a wide variety of industries such as food production, pharmaceuticals, industrial processing, materials science and alternative energy. Core engineering concepts are presented in entertaining ways through short daily lectures, class activities and daily hands-on laboratory exercises. Students are challenged through discussions on alternative energy production, reaction engineering, fluid dynamics, polymer synthesis, and the perennial question: What is the difference between chemistry and chemical engineering? *This course is recommended for highly motivated rising juniors and seniors.



INSTRUCTOR: Rachel Monfredobr]Rachel Monfredo is a Lecturer and Senior Technical Associate in Chemical Engineering. She came to engineering sideways—after a BA degree in psychology from Yale University, she received an MA in American art history at the University of Delaware and worked at the Boston MFA program for six years. While there she became interested in materials science, and returned to Boston University to get an M.S in manufacturing engineering/material science, and then went to University of Texas, Austin to work on the electromagnetic railgun for eight years. Rachel works with first years through seniors in the undergraduate laboratories; her current research focuses on engineering education.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

Do you ever wonder how polar bears survive in the cold? Or how snake venom actually kills prey? Or how bats can see if they are “blind as a bat?” Or how some animals never drink water? The answers to these questions lie in basic animal physiology. The animal kingdom encompasses several million species, all of which are adapted to their particular environments. This course will use a combination of lectures and fun hands-on activities to teach you more about animals. You will learn how animals’ functions and bodily processes allow them to live in their vastly different ecosystems. By the end of the course, you will be able to impress others by quickly identifying all sorts of fun facts about animals, including where they live and what they eat.



INSTRUCTOR: Stacy Ruvio
Stacy earned a BS in biology from SUNY Geneseo in 2005. She received her PhD in biochemistry from the University of Buffalo in 2010, where her dissertation project was in the field of neuroscience. She is currently a post-doctoral research assistant in the Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy at the University of Rochester. Stacy has also been a teaching docent at the Buffalo Zoo since 2008.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm-4:00 pm

This course teaches you the underlying physiology of crucial human organ systems and the process of recording the biological signals that dictate how they perform. You will learn about vital signs like blood pressure, heart rate, and electrical signals produced by the muscles and heart. You will also learn to interpret and integrate these signals with biological processes and diseases.



INSTRUCTOR: Kanika Vats
Among the various sub-disciplines of science, biomedical engineering has fascinated Dr. Vats immensely because of its remarkable potential to positively influence the living world. During her doctoral study at Pennsylvania State University and post-doctoral training at the University of Rochester, she acquired extensive practical training in biomedically relevant fields such as biomedical nanotechnology, biomaterial design and characterization, and the assessment of cell-biomaterial interactions. Currently, she designs and runs a vibrant, hands-on undergraduate laboratory teaching program in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Rochester.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

This interactive course will give you an accurate and up-to-date overview of all the fields in astronomy and astrophysics. We will focus on concepts such as: stars and stellar evolution, galaxies, black holes, and gravitational waves. By the end of the week, you will have a grasp of core astronomy concepts and theories through fun and exciting activities. No Math background necessary.


INSTRUCTOR: Jacob Lange 
Jacob Lange is a PhD candidate at Rochester Institute of Technology under Dr. Richard O’Shaughnessy. His research involves parameter estimation of gravitational wave sources by comparing directly to numerical relativity simulations. He completed his Master’s level thesis this past summer and is continuing to his PhD dissertation. He obtained a dual B.S. degree in Physics and Astronomy/Astrophysics in 2014 from Florida Institute of Technology.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

Jump into the world of crime scene investigation (CSI) as you study how to process evidence from a homicide. During the investigation, you will study fingerprints, hairs, fibers, powders, and fur to determine the perpetrator of this ultimate whodunit. Throughout this intense week, you will familiarize yourself with the scientific method, microscopes, teamwork, and lab safety. Your group will work diligently to find the killer by the end of the week.


INSTRUCTOR: Dennis Mucenski
Dennis was destined to become a forensics teacher from the first time he watched Law and Order and then CSI. He developed a forensics class at Pittsford Mendon High School and then started co-teaching a forensics course for teachers at College of the Atlantic. He is a published author, does webinars for Ward’s Natural Science, and a three-day conference on how to incorporate forensics into school curricula each July. Dennis also teaches an undergrad and graduate course on the science of crime scene investigation at St. John Fisher College.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

Learn more about quantum physics through demonstrations, lectures, and experiments. You’ll participate in a series of mini-lectures and demonstrations about the basic phenomena of quantum physics. The mini-lectures will require only a math background in algebra. Basic quantum mechanics covered will include quantum tunneling, quantum superposition, and two-particle quantum entanglement. The demonstrations will include a series of optics experiments such as the quantum eraser, optical interferometry, generation if the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox (aka “spooky action at a distance”, and Bell’s inequality.


Learn more by viewing the video: Strangeness in Quantum Physics


INSTRUCTOR: Andrew Jordan
Andrew, a Texas native, has a BS in physics and mathematics from Texas A&M University. He received his doctorate in theoretical physics from the University of California, Santa Barbara. He did post-doctoral research at the University of Geneva, Switzerland, and also worked as a research scientist at Texas A&M. He is currently an assistant professor of physics at the University of Rochester. His research has been featured in Nature News and New Scientist magazine.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

Be adventurous, travel through dance to explore cultures of the world!  This week-long investigation will focus on cultural dance forms such as: West African Dance, Middle Eastern Dance, American Tap/jazz, and Capoeira.   Inspired by these forms, students will be encouraged to dive into their own creativity as they explore various methods of dance-making.  This intensive will  provide the opportunity to encounter multiple dance styles, explore cultural tradition, and practice creativity.


INSTRUCTOR: Rose Pasquarello Beauchamp
Rose Pasquarello Beauchamp (MFA) is an artist, dancer, somatic educator, filmmaker, and activist. She is a Certified Laban Movement Analyst (CLMA) which has rooted all of her teaching and artistic work in somatics and body awareness. As the Artistic Director of inFluxdance, Co-Founder of Artists Coalition for Change (ACCT) and Co-Founder with SirensProof Films, her work has been featured in cities across the country and internationally.  Currently, Rose is on faculty at the University of Rochester.  She is performing and presenting her work internationally with a focus on exploring metaphor as it relates to socio-political art making.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

What is it like to be a dentist, orthodontist, pediatric dentist, prosthodontist, periodontist, or oral surgeon? This course will focus on the ever-changing field of oral health and the high demands for dentists to meet the needs of local, national, and international patient populations. You’ll explore hands-on dental procedures, examine the latest equipment, and take a close look at the skills and educational requirements necessary to become an oral health professional. You will learn how to conduct an oral examination and make diagnostic plaster models of teeth. You’ll meet with dentists pursuing careers as faculty, researchers investigating basic sciences and translational arenas, and dental specialists working in diverse and emerging areas of treatment, including dental implants and cosmetic dentistry. You’ll visit the ambulatory care dental unit and the Center for Oral Biology at the University’s Medical Center.



Learn more by viewing the video: Exploring Oral Health


INSTRUCTOR: Mary Pistilli
Mary is a Dental Hygienist with over twenty years experience in clinical, school based dental programs and community outreach programs at the University of Rochester’s Eastman Institute for Oral Health that collaborates with the Rochester City School District and the community at large. She coordinates and uses initiative to work with the Rochester City School District and outside agencies to provide more widespread care for children in the community. As a clinician, educator and recruiter, Mary has a diversity of skills and a versatile background working in various environments such as Hillside Children’s Center, Pre-school children, High School students, and adults. She has experience as a Preceptor, Oral Health Project Counselor, guest speaker on Hillside Family Forum and Project Manager for a research grant. Mary is a graduate of Old Dominion University with Bachelor of Science Degree in Dental Hygiene – Cum laude.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

This course will use a mixed media approach to introduce the field of mental health (including psychiatry, psychiatric nurse practitioner, clinical psychology, social work, marriage and family therapy, mental health counseling, play therapy, art therapy, and music therapy); the various educational and professional pathways for becoming a mental health provider; as well as some of the basic skills and qualities that are necessary for doing the work. Through hands-on activities (role play, work sheets, and mock interventions), short video clips, as well as simple case studies, students will learn about what it is like to be a mental health provider.

 


INSTRUCTOR: Jennifer King
Jennifer Horne King is a practicing couple and family therapist. She is also a PhD candidate in Human Development and Family Science at Syracuse University under D. Bruce Carter. Her research involves looking at mother-daughter communication during puberty. Jennifer has two master’s degrees, one in clinical psychology and one in marriage & family therapy. As a clinical associate, Jennifer helps to train graduate-level marriage and family therapy students at the University of Rochester School of Medicine.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

This course will use a mixed media approach to introduce the field of mental health (including psychiatry, psychiatric nurse practitioner, clinical psychology, social work, marriage and family therapy, mental health counseling, play therapy, art therapy, and music therapy); the various educational and professional pathways for becoming a mental health provider; as well as some of the basic skills and qualities that are necessary for doing the work. Through hands-on activities (role play, work sheets, and mock interventions), short video clips, as well as simple case studies, students will learn about what it is like to be a mental health provider.


INSTRUCTOR: Jennifer King
Jennifer Horne King is a practicing couple and family therapist. She is also a PhD candidate in Human Development and Family Science at Syracuse University under D. Bruce Carter. Her research involves looking at mother-daughter communication during puberty. Jennifer has two master’s degrees, one in clinical psychology and one in marriage & family therapy. As a clinical associate, Jennifer helps to train graduate-level marriage and family therapy students at the University of Rochester School of Medicine.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

Before Victor Frankenstein’s monstrous creation became a Halloween costume and a mascot for all things strange and terrifying, he was a nightmare dreamt up by a young girl in the midst of a ghost story telling contest. Unlike his sometimes campy twentieth century manifestation, the humanoid monster in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818) spoke to serious fears about man’s relationship to nature and his ambivalence about his place in the universe. This course will involve a deep experience with a myriad of cultural artifacts including stories, paintings, and horror films. We will explore how and to what ends these various works evoke terror, what their methods for doing so meant to their contemporary audiences and what gives them the power to appeal to audiences far beyond those their authors originally envisioned.


INSTRUCTOR: Rob Rich
Rob Rich is a PhD Candidate in English and a writing instructor with the University of Rochester who regularly teaches a Writing 105 class on “Hypothetical Realities.” He works as a project assistant for the William Blake Archive and as a Teaching Assistant for Curt Smith’s “Presidential Rhetoric” class. He has also taught a class on “Gothic and Horror in Literature and Culture” through the English department.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

What’s it like to be a physician? What does it take to become a doctor? Meet with practicing physicians, medical students, and other experts. Explore hands-on medical procedures, examine equipment, and discuss medical ethics and the role of the physician. Learn what it takes, academically, to prepare for medical school, and how to decide if medicine is the right path for you. Examine the current pros and cons of being a doctor.

*Please note: A $25 lab fee applies.



INSTRUCTOR: University of Rochester Medical Center Faculty

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

Writing is an essential skill to success in college. The goal of this course is that students will practice writing well organized, creative and effective essays. They will review structure, vocabulary, grammar and strategies. Every day they will receive tips and individual feedback as they write, revise and complete essays. This class is specific for international students.


INSTRUCTOR: Sarah Collins 

 


TASTE OF COLLEGE

TASTE OF COLLEGE
11–12 | UR 
Commuter students only. Residential option not available for the Spring semester.

With the Taste of College program, students will get a jump-start on their college career. This program allows students to earn college credit and study among Rochester undergraduates. The classes motivate students to explore subjects typically reserved for study on a collegiate level. Courses are offered during the University’s fall, spring, and summer academic semesters, and credits are transferable to most colleges and universities.


Please note:

  • On-campus housing is not available during the Spring semester.
  • First-time students are only permitted to take one TOC course.


CREDIT COURSES

Following are the 2018 class offerings during the University of Rochester’s Taste of College Spring semester. These courses do not have any prerequisites unless noted.

20th Century Storytelling: Art, Language, and Document in the Age of Information
AA Religious Traditions
Abnormal Psychology
Acting Techniques II
Adolescent Development
Advanced Front End Web Design
Aesthetics
African-American History I to 1900
African-Americans in South Africa
American Elections
American Literature
American Movies in their Moment: The Silver Age, 1968-1980
America’s National Parks
Anthropology & Development
Applied Statistics for Social Sciences I
Applied Statistics for the Biological and Physical Sciences I
Archaeology African Diaspora
Archaeology of West Africa: 500 R.C. – A.D. 1950
Art and Environment
Arts of East Asia (II): 1000 CE – Present
Asian Calligraphy: History and Practice II
Authoritarianism
Beg. Piano: RC Non-Music Major
Beginning American Sign Language
Beginning Contemporary Dance Technique
Beginning Dance Techniques (Jazz, Ballet and Modern)
Being Homo Sapiens: The Brain, The Mind, The Heart and Full Catastrophe
Beyond Books: Narrative Across Media
Beyond the Basics – Guitar
Biomedical Optics
Bioprocess Engineering
Biostatistics
Black Holes & Time Warps
Black Lit & Visual Culture
Black Paris
British Literature II
Business Ethics
Calculus I
Calculus IA
Capoeira: Brazilian Art Movement
Capoeira: Strategies & Improvisation
Changing Genres of Erotica
Chaucer
Chinese Religions
Chemical Engineering Practice
Classical Mythology
CNC Finish & Precision MFG
Cold War: Europe Between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R.
Colonial Latin America
Comic Book Religion
Comics and Culture
Comparative Politics Parties
Contact Improvisation & Culture
Contemporary Moral Problems
Contemporary Social Movements: Exploring Social and Political Change
Creativity, Innovation, and Imagination
Cry Freedom
Culture and Learning
Culture in Chaos: Russia’s Silver Age
Dance History: Philosophy, Aesthetics & Culture
Dance Improvisation
Darwin & Darwinism
Data Analysis I
Database Systems
Design American Democracy
Design for the Stage: Set
Design in the Digital Age
Development Economics
Development of Mind & Brain
Digital History: The World that Trade Created, 1400-Present
Digital Imaging: Transforming Real into Virtual
Discrete Mathematics
Disease and Society
Diverse Languages, Diverse Identities
Drugs, Sex, and Rock ‘n’ Roll? The Truth About Teens
Early Civilizations of Africa
Early Women Writers
Earth Materials
Earthquakes, Volcanoes and Mountain Ranges
Elementary Latin I
Elementary Spanish I
Elements of Music
Escapism, Entertainment, and Blurring the Fantasy/Reality Divide
Ethics
Ethnic Politics
England and Ireland Since 1500
Environmental Politics
Ethical Decisions in Medicine
Eukaryotic Genomes
Evolution of the Earth
Excursions in Math
Experiencing Music
Exploring Intercultural Competence: Preparation for the Global Citizen
Fantasy Worlds: Medieval to Modern
Fear & Loathing in Tokyo: Japanese Mystery Fiction
Feature Writing
Feature Writing and Multimedia Storytelling
Feeling Good: Empathy and Ethics
Fictions of Femininity: Japanese Women Writers of the Past and Present
Found. Modern Int’l Politics
Foundations of Cognitive Science
From Confucius to Zen
From Pong to Pokemon Go: The Past, Present and Future of Video Games
Fundamentals of Movement
Game Theory
Gamelan Ensemble
Gateway to History: Homosexuals, Heretics, Witches, and Werewolves: Deviants in Medieval Europe
Gateway to History: Native American History
Geometry & Mechanics of Thrust Faults
Getting Medieval: Gender and Race in Representations of the Middle Ages
Global Masculinities
Great Books: Myth
Health, Medicine, and Social Reform
History of Brazil, 1500-2009
History of Energy Resources and Utilization
History of Feminism: Colloq.
History of Geographic Exploration
History of Judaism
History of Modern Philosophy I
History of Mortality
History of Photography II
Hitler’s Germany, 1914-1945
Human Happiness
Hypothetical Realities
Image, Text, and Technology
Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Interactive Music Prog.
Interfacing with Microcontrollers
Interfaith Relations: The Globalization of God
International Economics
International Fiction
Int’l Environmental Law
Intro Programming
Intro to Biblical Hebrew
Intro to Classical Guitar
Intro to Computer Science
Intro to Design for Stage
Intro to Energy Systems
Intro to Public Health
Intro to Oceanography
Intro to Stage Lighting & Sound
Intro to Web Programming
Introduction to Debate
Introduction to Drawing
Introduction to Environmental Science
Introduction to International Political Economy
Introduction to Linguistic Analysis
Introduction to Media Studies
Introduction to Music Theory
Introduction to Painting
Introduction to Philosophy
Introduction to Photography
Introduction to Positive Political Theory
Introduction to Printmaking
Introduction to Sculpture
Introduction to Studio Art
Introduction to the New Testement
Introduction to Visual & Cultural Studies
Introduction to Yoga
Introductory Logic
iReligion: Religion in the Digital Age
Is Identity Destiny?
Israel/Palestine
It’s the End of the World As We Know It (And I Feel Fine)
Italy and the New World
“I’ve Been Tricked!”: The Cultural Role of the Trickster Figure
Judaism and Film
Knights, Criminals, and the Crown: Research in Medieval England
Language as a Window into the Mind
Language, Identity, and Power
Law in Public Practice
Lens Design
LGBTQ Experiences in US History
Life & Anime
Mask, Character and Voice: The Actor Explores
Mastering the Actor’s Body
Materiality and Meaning
Mbira Ensemble
Media in the Digital Age
Medical Anthropology
Medieval Celtic Literature in Translation
Methods of Inquiry
Major Authors: Melville & Twain
Middle Eastern Dance: Folkloric/Bedouin
Modern African-American English
Monsters, Ghosts, Fairies, & Gods: Encountering the Strange in Classical Literature
Moving into Stillness
Music, Ethnography, and HIV/AIDS
Music and Religion
Musicianship I: Literacy Skills
Neural Foundations of Behavior
Neuroethics
New Media and Emerging Practice I
Not Cults: New Religious Movements East and West
Opto-Mechanical
Pagans and Christian in Medieval Literature
Paleoceanography and Climate Change
Peer Relat. in Childhood & Adol.
Performance Studies
Phil. Foundations of Feminism
Plays in Production: Current Semester
Post-1989 Polish Culture Through Film, Literature, and Digital Media
Post-humanism: Science, Technology, and the Human Condition
Poverty & Development
Presidential Rhetoric
Principles of Economics
Principles of Biology I
Problem of Western Civilization
Psychology of Consumerism
Psychology of Wellness
Public Speaking
Qigong Way to Health
Quantitative Environmental Problem Solving
Queer Theory
Race in American Writing
Reasoning and Writing in the College
Rebels Without a Cause: The America Loner Tradition
Religion and Politics: Is a Vibrant Multi-Religious Democracy Possible?
Renaissance Drama
Research Methods in Psychology
Roman Novel
Romantic Literature: The Gothic Spirit
Russia Now
Russian Civilization
Science and Reason
Science, Magic, and the Occult from Antiquity to Newton
Science, Sex and Society in Victorian Britain
Science-Fiction: Robots and Races
Selected Topics in Medieval Philosophy
Slavery & The 20th-Century African-American Novel
Slavery in 20th Century American Science Fiction
Soc. Const. of Whiteness
Social Implications of Computing
Social Psychology and Individual Differences
Sources and Detectors
Starmakers: Inside the Publicity Machine
Success (re)Defined in Post-secondary Institutions
Surface Analysis
Tai Chi Explorations
Taking it on Trust: Knowledge, Cooperation, and Vulnerability
Tap Dance in American History: Context & Practice
Technical Theater
Technology and You
The Art of Dance, Change & Community Practice
The Body in Early Christianity
The Chemistry of Poisons
The Civil War
The Golden Age(s) of Television
The Great War Revisited
The History of the Christian Church: From the Reformation to the Present
The Idea of America
The Intellectual History of Istanbul
The Making of Donald Trump’s America
The Nature of the Physical World
The Outlaw Robin Hood: Resistance, Violence, and Social Change in Popular Culture
The Rhetoric of Ecology and Environmentalism
The Role of the State in Global Historical Perspective
The Truth is Out There: Hoaxes, Conspiracy Theories and Alternative Facts
The Witch
Thinking Critically about Media Bias
Thinking Through the Copy
Tibet: History from Myth
Topics in Italian Culture: Create A Documentary: Italy’s Hidden Treasures
Tourist Japan
Traditional China
Translation & World Literature
Unequal Development and State Policy: Brazil, the US, and Nigeria
United States Policy Making Processes
U.S. Life: Customs & Practices
Visco in Bio Tissues
Vision and the Eye
War, Money, and Ordinary People: European History 1492-1789
War and Society in Classical Antiquity
Web -Wide World: Living in Virtual Community
West African Dance: Context & Practice
West African Drumming Intro
What Do People Do All Day? Careers in America
What Does a Feminist Look Like?
When War Should End
Women’s Power in Italian Art: Eros, Passions, and Business
Writing About Food
Writing Discontentment: Political Turmoil, Social Critique and Civic Responsibility in Late Qing Literature
Xenophon
Yoga II: Continuing the Journey

View course schedules and class descriptions by University Semesters.


TUITION AND FEES

Tuition for non-matriculated students is $1,022.00 per credit hour.

Learn more about tuition and fees.

Please note: 100% tuition is due at the time of registration.

Employees: If you are a University of Rochester employee, your children may be eligible for tuition benefits. Learn more.


APPLICATION PROCESS

  • Submit the completed TOC application at least 30 days before the start of class.
  • Schedule an interview with the Pre-College Programs office. (Pre-College Programs Skype: UR_precollege)
  • Allow up to 14 business days for the application to be reviewed.
  • Admitted students will submit payment in the form of a credit card, check, or tuition waiver.


Obtaining an ID card: Your ID card will allow you to check books out of the library, attend campus events, etc.

Parking Pass: All parking on campus requires a parking pass. Learn more.

Books: Most classes require books. These can be purchased in person at the bookstore or online.


DROPPING/ADDING COURSES

The deadline for dropping a course or adding a new course is typically the end of the fourth week of classes. All of these changes must be submitted on an official Drop/Add form to the Office of Pre-College Programs. Students must obtain the instructor’s signature for all courses added after the first day of classes. Courses dropped during the first four weeks of classes will be deleted entirely from the official record; however, you will be financially responsible following the refund schedule below.

Any additional tuition for an added course is to be paid at the time the change is made. The deadline for withdrawing from a course is the last day of the eleventh week of the semester. Courses from which non-matriculated students withdraw will appear on the grade report and transcript with a “W” and the week of withdrawal.

Tuition Refund Schedule: If you are dropping or withdrawing from a course, you may only be refunded a portion of the tuition paid. Learn more.


REQUESTING A TRANSCRIPT

Taste of College students will need to request their own transcripts if they require a copy (for personal use or for high school records).

Transcripts can be requested through a student’s Blackboard account or directly through the Office of the Registrar.

TASTE OF COLLEGE
11–12 | UR | 4-wk
Commuter students only. Residential option not available for A1 session.

With the Taste of College program, students will get a jump-start on their college career. This program allows students to earn college credit and study among Rochester undergraduates. The classes motivate students to explore subjects typically reserved for study on a collegiate level. Courses are offered during the University’s fall, spring, and summer academic semesters, and credits are transferable to most colleges and universities.


Please note:

  • On-campus housing is not available during the A1 Summer Session.
  • First-time students are only permitted to take one TOC course.


CREDIT COURSES

Following are the Summer 2018 class offerings during the University of Rochester’s Taste of College A1 Session. These courses do not have any prerequisites unless noted.

Arabic Media & Literature
Contemporaries: Queer Art After 1960
Cultural Anthropology
Exploring Classical Music
Foundations of Cognitive Science
Introduction to CAD and Drawing
Introduction to Drawing
Introduction to International Relations
Introduction to Linguistic Analysis
Introduction to Music Theory (Prerequisite: Ability to read music)
Introduction to Philosophy
Movement Analysis & Integration
Neural Foundations of Behavior
Romantic Poetry
Sexuality, Gender, and Health
Social and Emotional Development
Social Psychology and Individual Differences
Studies in Renaissance Literature
The Struggle for Reform: Human Rights in Latin America
Theories of Personality and Psychotherapy
Video Game History Through Genre: Platformer, Role-Playing Game, Action-Adventure, and First-Person Shooter
West African Dance: Context & Practice

View course schedules and class descriptions by University Semesters.


TUITION AND FEES

Tuition for non-matriculated students is $900.00 per credit hour.

Learn more about tuition and fees.

Please note: For the summer sessions, 100% tuition is due at the time of registration.

Employees: If you are a University of Rochester employee, your children may be eligible for tuition benefits. Learn more.


APPLICATION PROCESS

  • Submit the completed TOC application at least 30 days before the start of class.
  • Schedule an interview with the Pre-College Programs office. (Pre-College Programs Skype: UR_precollege)
  • Allow up to 14 business days for the application to be reviewed.
  • Admitted students will submit payment in the form of a credit card, check, or tuition waiver.
  • Attend orientation the Sunday before your session begins.


ORIENTATION

Newly admitted TOC students must attend an orientation offered by the Pre-College Programs office. During orientation, students will be given a tour of campus, including their classroom location, and be taken to the ID office, parking office, and bookstore. Please note the following information:

Obtaining an ID card: Your ID card will allow you to check books out of the library, attend campus events, etc.

Parking Pass: All parking on campus requires a parking pass. Learn more.

Books: Most classes require books. These can be purchased in person at the bookstore or online.


DROPPING/ADDING COURSES

The deadline for dropping a course or adding a new course is the end of the fourth week of classes. All of these changes must be submitted on an official Drop/Add form to the Office of Pre-College Programs. Students must obtain the instructor’s signature for all courses added after the first day of classes. Courses dropped during the first four weeks of classes will be deleted entirely from the official record; however, you will be financially responsible following the refund schedule below.

Any additional tuition for an added course is to be paid at the time the change is made. The deadline for withdrawing from a course is the last day of the eleventh week of the semester. Courses from which non-matriculated students withdraw will appear on the grade report and transcript with a “W” and the week of withdrawal.

Tuition Refund Schedule: If you are dropping or withdrawing from a course, you may only be refunded a portion of the tuition paid. Learn more.


REQUESTING A TRANSCRIPT

Taste of College students will need to request their own transcripts if they require a copy (for personal use or for high school records).

Transcripts can be requested through a student’s Blackboard account or directly through the Office of the Registrar.

TASTE OF COLLEGE
11–12 | UR | 6-wk
Commuter students only. Residential option not available for A2 session.

With the Taste of College program, students will get a jump-start on their college career. This program allows students to earn college credit and study among Rochester undergraduates. The classes motivate students to explore subjects typically reserved for study on a collegiate level. Courses are offered during the University’s fall, spring, and summer academic semesters, and credits are transferable to most colleges and universities.


Please note:

  • On-campus housing is not available during the A2 Summer Session.
  • First-time students are only permitted to take one TOC course.


CREDIT COURSES

Following are the Summer 2018 class offerings during the University of Rochester’s Taste of College A2 Session. These courses do not have any prerequisites unless noted.

Beginning American Sign Language I
Calculus I
Chm Concepts, Systems, Practice I
Feminist Art: 1970s and Beyond
French in Focus: Intensive Elementary French
Intensive Elementary Spanish
Intro to Computer Science
Intro to Programming
Introduction to Psychology
Linear Algebra with Differential Equations (Prerequisite: Must have exhausted all high school math classes)
Medical Anthropology
Principles of Biology I (Prerequisite: CHM 131)
Principles of Biology II
Principles of Economics
Reasoning and Writing in the College
Recreational Graphics
Rushin’ Through Russia: Intensive Elementary Russian
Seeking God in America
Social Implications of Computing
Web Design and Development
Writing for Computer Science

View course schedules and class descriptions by University Semesters.


TUITION AND FEES

Tuition for non-matriculated students is $900.00 per credit hour.

Please note: For the summer sessions, 100% tuition is due at the time of registration.

Employees: If you are a University of Rochester employee, your children may be eligible for tuition benefits. Learn more about tuition.


APPLICATION PROCESS

  • Submit the completed TOC application at least 30 days before the start of class.
  • Schedule an interview with the Pre-College Programs office. (Pre-College Programs Skype: UR_precollege)
  • Allow up to 14 business days for the application to be reviewed.
  • Admitted students will submit payment in the form of a credit card, check, or tuition waiver.
  • Attend orientation the Sunday prior to the start of your session.


ORIENTATION

Newly admitted TOC students must attend an orientation offered by the Pre-College Programs office. During orientation, students will be given a tour of campus, including their classroom location, and be taken to the ID office, parking office, and bookstore. Please note the following information:

Obtaining an ID card: Your ID card will allow you to check books out of the library, attend campus events, etc.

Parking Pass: All parking on campus requires a parking pass. Learn more about parking.

Books: Most classes require books. These can be purchased in person at the bookstore or purchased online.


DROPPING/ADDING COURSES

The deadline for dropping a course or adding a new course is the end of the fourth week of classes. All of these changes must be submitted on an official Drop/Add form to the Office of Pre-College Programs. Students must obtain the instructor’s signature for all courses added after the first day of classes. Courses dropped during the first four weeks of classes will be deleted entirely from the official record; however, you will be financially responsible following the refund schedule below.

Any additional tuition for an added course is to be paid at the time the change is made. The deadline for withdrawing from a course is the last day of the eleventh week of the semester. Courses from which non-matriculated students withdraw will appear on the grade report and transcript with a “W” and the week of withdrawal.

Tuition Refund Schedule: If you are dropping or withdrawing from a course, you may only be refunded a portion of the tuition paid. Learn more about refunds.


REQUESTING A TRANSCRIPT

Taste of College students will need to request their own transcripts if they require a copy (for personal use or for high school records).

Transcripts can be requested through a student’s Blackboard account or directly through the Office of the Registrar.

TASTE OF COLLEGE
RO | 11–12 | UR | 4-wk

With the Taste of College program, students will get a jump-start on their college career. This program allows students to earn college credit and study among Rochester undergraduates. The classes motivate students to explore subjects typically reserved for study on a collegiate level. Courses are offered during the University’s fall, spring, and summer academic semesters, and credits are transferable to most colleges and universities. During the B1 session, students have the option to live on campus, or commute to and from campus on their own.


Please note: First-time students are only permitted to take one TOC course.


CREDIT COURSES

Following are the Summer 2018 class offerings during the University of Rochester’s Taste of College B1 Session. These courses do not have any prerequisites unless noted.

Abnormal Psychology
Adolescent Development
Introduction to Comparative Politics
Introduction to International Relations
Marco Polo and Medieval Travels
Moral Problems
Prep For College Chemistry
Psychology of Gender
The Contemporary Novel

View course schedules and class descriptions by University Semesters.


TUITION AND FEES

Tuition for non-matriculated students is $900.00 per credit hour. For students who wish to live on campus, there will be an additional charge for room and board.

Learn more about tuition and fees.

Please note: For the summer sessions, 100% tuition is due at the time of registration.

Employees: If you are a University of Rochester employee, your children may be eligible for tuition benefits. Learn more.


APPLICATION PROCESS

  • Submit the completed TOC application at least 30 days before the start of class.
  • Schedule an interview with the Pre-College Programs office. (Pre-College Programs Skype: UR_precollege)
  • Allow up to 14 business days for the application to be reviewed.
  • Admitted students will submit payment in the form of a credit card, check, or tuition waiver.
  • Attend orientation the Sunday prior to the start of your session.


ORIENTATION

Newly admitted TOC students must attend an orientation offered by the Pre-College Programs office. During orientation, students will be given a tour of campus, including their classroom location, and be taken to the ID office, parking office, and bookstore. Please note the following information:

Obtaining an ID card: Your ID card will allow you to check books out of the library, attend campus events, etc.

Parking Pass: All parking on campus requires a parking pass. Learn more about parking.

Books: Most classes require books. These can be purchased in person at the bookstore or purchased online.


DROPPING/ADDING COURSES

The deadline for dropping a course or adding a new course is the end of the fourth week of classes. All of these changes must be submitted on an official Drop/Add form to the Office of Pre-College Programs. Students must obtain the instructor’s signature for all courses added after the first day of classes. Courses dropped during the first four weeks of classes will be deleted entirely from the official record; however, you will be financially responsible following the refund schedule below.

Any additional tuition for an added course is to be paid at the time the change is made. The deadline for withdrawing from a course is the last day of the eleventh week of the semester. Courses from which non-matriculated students withdraw will appear on the grade report and transcript with a “W” and the week of withdrawal.

Tuition Refund Schedule: If you are dropping or withdrawing from a course, you may only be refunded a portion of the tuition paid. Learn more about refunds.


REQUESTING A TRANSCRIPT

Taste of College students will need to request their own transcripts if they require a copy (for personal use or for high school records).

Transcripts can be requested through a student’s Blackboard account or directly through the Office of the Registrar.

TASTE OF COLLEGE
RO | 11–12 | UR | 6-wk

With the Taste of College program, students will get a jump-start on their college career. This program allows students to earn college credit and study among Rochester undergraduates. The classes motivate students to explore subjects typically reserved for study on a collegiate level. Courses are offered during the University’s fall, spring, and summer academic semesters, and credits are transferable to most colleges and universities. During the B2 session, students have the option to live on campus, or commute to and from campus on their own.


Please note: First-time students are only permitted to take one TOC course.


CREDIT COURSES

Following are the Summer 2018 class offerings during the University of Rochester’s Taste of College B2 Session. These courses do not have any prerequisites unless noted.

Beginning American Sign Language I
Chm Concepts, Systems, Practice II (Prerequisite: CHM 131)
Global Modern Architecture
Hamilton’s Atlantic World
Intensive Elementary Chinese
Linear Algebra with Differential Equations (Prerequisite: Must have exhausted all high school math classes)
The Other Histories of Photography

View course schedules and class descriptions by University Semesters.


TUITION AND FEES

Tuition for non-matriculated students is $900.00 per credit hour. For students who wish to live on campus, there will be an additional charge for room and board.

Learn more about tuition and fees.

Please note: For the summer sessions, 100% tuition is due at the time of registration.

Employees: If you are a University of Rochester employee, your children may be eligible for tuition benefits. Learn more.


APPLICATION PROCESS

  • Submit the completed TOC application at least 30 days before the start of class.
  • Schedule an interview with the Pre-College Programs office. (Pre-College Programs Skype: UR_precollege)
  • Allow up to 14 business days for the application to be reviewed.
  • Admitted students will submit payment in the form of a credit card, check, or tuition waiver.
  • Attend orientation the Sunday prior to the start of your session.


ORIENTATION

Newly admitted TOC students must attend an orientation offered by the Pre-College Programs office. During orientation, students will be given a tour of campus, including their classroom location, and be taken to the ID office, parking office, and bookstore. Please note the following information:

Obtaining an ID card: Your ID card will allow you to check books out of the library, attend campus events, etc.

Parking Pass: All parking on campus requires a parking pass. Learn more about parking.

Books: Most classes require books. These can be purchased in person at the bookstore or purchased online.


DROPPING/ADDING COURSES

The deadline for dropping a course or adding a new course is the end of the fourth week of classes. All of these changes must be submitted on an official Drop/Add form to the Office of Pre-College Programs. Students must obtain the instructor’s signature for all courses added after the first day of classes. Courses dropped during the first four weeks of classes will be deleted entirely from the official record; however, you will be financially responsible following the refund schedule below.

Any additional tuition for an added course is to be paid at the time the change is made. The deadline for withdrawing from a course is the last day of the eleventh week of the semester. Courses from which non-matriculated students withdraw will appear on the grade report and transcript with a “W” and the week of withdrawal.

Tuition Refund Schedule: If you are dropping or withdrawing from a course, you may only be refunded a portion of the tuition paid. Learn more about refunds.


REQUESTING A TRANSCRIPT

Taste of College students will need to request their own transcripts if they require a copy (for personal use or for high school records).

Transcripts can be requested through a student’s Blackboard account or directly through the Office of the Registrar.