INTENSIVE STUDIES: July 10–28, 2017

RR | 11–12 | 3-wk Full Day

The Simon Business School encourages creative ideas, entrepreneurship, and collaboration. This intensive program will have you work in teams to create your own business plan while vising some of the top local business for inspiration. Courses in marketing, career prep, and teamwork allow you to explore the world of business, from practicing your pitch to developing a business strategy.

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

  • A commuter component is not available.
  • Outline and structure are subject to change at the discretion of the professors.
  • Enrollment is limited; selection for this program is competitive.

INSTRUCTORS

Simon Business School Faculty

RO | 9–12 | 3-wk | Int’l Full Day

Designed for non-native English speakers, this program focuses on developing English language skills through themed coursework in areas such as business, engineering, or computer science. In addition to the area studies, you will attend classes in essay writing, oral communication, and TOEFL preparation. The English Language Program will strengthen the communication skills required for collegiate success while still allowing you to explore your academic areas of interest. You will also tour the local community through trips to museums, Niagara Falls, and other hotspots.

INSTRUCTORS

TBD

RR | 11–12 | 3-wk Full Day

The Hajim School of Engineering and Applied Sciences celebrates independence, advanced research, invention, and problem-solving skills. This hands-on engineering program allows you to investigate topics like biomedical engineering, optics, and audio and music, using the vast resources of the Hajim School.

Biomedical engineering

 


Optics

 


Audio and music engineering

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

  • A commuter component is not available.
  • Outline and structure are subject to change at the discretion of the professors.
  • Enrollment is limited to 20 students; selection for this program is competitive.

INSTRUCTORS

Stephen Roessner, Audio and Music Engineering 
Stephen is a Grammy Award-winning recording engineer, musician, multi-instrumentalist, and producer. He has toured the world as a drummer for the instrumental rock band, Saxon Shore, and is also very active in the local music scene. He is currently a PhD student in electrical engineering at The University of Rochester and holds a BM in music performance in percussion, a BS in sound recording, and a MSEE in audio signal processing. Stephen’s research interests include acoustics, signal processing, and hardware electronics. He also teaches courses in audio engineering and critical listening at the University. Outside of the University, Stephen owns his own recording studio, Calibrated Recording, and frequently travels to other cities to do on-location recordings.

Scott Seidman, Biomedical Engineering 
Associate professor Scott H. Seidman has been on the faculty of the Biomedical Engineering Department at the University of Rochester since its creation in 2000. His research interests include the detection of motion by the inner ear, and how this information is used by navigational and orientational mechanisms. Scott is co-director of the technology core of the Center for Navigation and Communication Sciences, funded by the National Institute of Deafness and other Communication Disorders, and helps disseminate technological development to other NIDCD cores. He has designed two laboratory-intensive courses, including the BME core course, Quantitative Physiology. He also co-teaches the year-long undergraduate senior design sequence.

Scott’s engineering background is in bioinstrumentation and embedded devices. He has applied this expertise as co-inventor on two patent applications for medical devices, both in the area of neonatal monitoring. One of these devices comes directly out of a BME senior design project, and he shares inventorship with four alumni of our design program and two UR neonatologists. Another area of interest is assistive technology to help people with profound accessibility issues use computers.

He served as director of an international design educational initiative funded by the National Collegiate Inventors and Innovators Alliance in which students and faculty traveled between the University of Rochester and Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú (PUCP) in Lima to identify global health needs of developing nations that could be addressed by the design programs of both schools. Seidman serves as the faculty advisor of the University of Rochester chapter of Engineers Without Borders.

Nick Vamivakas, Optics
Nick Vamivakas studied electrical engineering at Boston University and received his PhD in 2007. During this time, he developed high resolution microscopy and spectroscopy techniques to study the electro-optic properties of individual nanostructures. Following his PhD, he did a post-doc from 2007 to 2011 in the Cavendish Laboratory at the University of Cambridge. Nick joined the Institute of Optics in 2011 and is currently an assistant professor. Professor Vamivakas’s research efforts center on light-matter interaction at the nanoscale. He is particularly interested in using optics to interrogate and control both artificial and naturally occurring solid-state quantum emitters. Potential applications range from optical metrology to quantum information science.

RR | 11–12 | 3-wk Full Day

This unique and selective program is open to students interested in pursuing careers in medicine. This rigorous program offers research labs, rotations, and service learning. You will get firsthand experience with the clinical, community service, and public health aspects of medicine, getting a real taste of the medical school experience.

COURSE OUTLINE

Anatomy and Physiology
Introduce students to anatomy through models and human organs (plastinated and embalmed organs).
Topics include: Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology, The Heart, Respiratory System, Muscular System, Nervous System

Neurology/Psychiatry
Designed to give students an understanding of the structure and function of the brain. Students will gain insight into the brain through dissection and prosection, and learn about various psychiatric disorders.
Topics include: Introduction to Neurology and Psychology, Anatomy and Psychology of the Brain

Public Health
Designed to introduce students to public health history, concepts, and contemporary issues. This week will examine Public Health via a tour of Mt. Hope Cemetery, and will include presentations and a poster session.
Topics include: History of Public Health, Public Health Disparities (health and wealth, social justice), Current Issues in Public Health (lead poisoning, tobacco, obesity, clean water/air, health systems/reforms), Global Health Issues (globalization and development, maternal/child health)

Other Activities
Standardized Patient Session, Learning to Take Vital Signs, Suture Session, Taping and Casting, Simulation Exercises (Cardiac, OB/GYN, Intubations, Phlebotomy), ED Rotation, Shadowing a Physician, Wilderness Medicine

TYPICAL DAY


Time Activity
9:00–10:00 am Lecture
10:15–11:30 am Lab Time
11:30 am–Noon Lab Time
Noon–1:30 pm Lunch
1:30–3:00 pm Experiential Sessions
5:00–6:30 pm Community Service Sessions (Thursday evenings)

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

  • A commuter component is not available.
  • Outline and structure are subject to change at the discretion of the professors.
  • Enrollment is limited to 30 students; selection for this program is competitive.

INSTRUCTORS

University of Rochester Medical Center Faculty

RO | 11–12 | 3-wk Full Day

This in-depth workshop recaptures some of the magic, fun, and rigor of the art of moviemaking and introduces you to old (16 mm black and white film stock, 1980s VCR cameras) and new (Vine, iMovie) traditions of short filmmaking. Through experiential activities like visiting the world-renowned George Eastman House of Film and Photography, you will plunge headfirst into an intimate relationship with the art of short visual storytelling.

 

Topics to be covered may include:
*Outline and structure are subject to change at the discretion of the professors.

  • Principles of narrative, documentary, and experimental film making
  • The materiality of film
  • Basic cinematography, including the framing and lighting of a shot
  • Purchasing and caring for film stock
  • How to load and operate a Bolex camera
  • Film processing, digital transfer, and the lab
  • Cutting/splicing film and projection
Other activities may include:
  • Exercises where we shoot footage of Rochester landmarks, including Mt. Hope Cemetery, the Kodak Building, and High Falls
  • Learning how to best submit films to festivals
  • Seeing how film is manufactured
  • Visiting the world-renowned George Eastman House of Film and Photography, and interacting with their film restoration specialists
  • Class visits by filmmakers

INSTRUCTOR: Johannes Bockwoldt
Johannes Bockwoldt, originally from Germany, has been making and teaching films since the last century. His extensive experience includes a focus on screenwriting and video editing. He continues to be excited about the endless possibilities of the medium.

 

ROCHESTER SCHOLARS, SESSION A: July 10–21, 2017

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

Learning about bones, muscles, joints, and movement has never been more fun! Through movement, poetry, and numerous hands-on activities, you will identify and explore the function of muscles and bones in your body. No dry memorization here; you will plunge into the subject of anatomy by putting those bones and muscles into action. Specially designed kinesthetic activities will embody these lessons. This class is perfect for you if you’re interested in health sciences, biology, kinesiology, physical therapy, dance, or massage therapy.

INSTRUCTOR: Anne Harris Wilcox
Anne Harris Wilcox MFA, is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Rochester, and the former President of the New York State Dance Education Association (President, 2012–2015). She is a NYS permanently certified K-12 dance educator and the Artistic Director of the Present Tense Dance Company, which she founded in 1991. Anne’s teaching interests include interdisciplinary studies, K-12 pedagogy, choreography, technique, and anatomy. In 2013, Anne created, Active Learning Games, LLC, designing and producing kinesthetic educational activities and products for grades K-12 and university.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

We live in a world connected by technology. This course will focus on the technology that interconnects the entire world through the Internet. You will explore the protocol that allows the Internet to work: TCP/IP. And on a much smaller scale, you’ll explore how information is transmitted across wired and wireless local area networks using the 802.3 and 802.11 standards. You will learn about switches and routers, the Cisco IOS, how to configure and connect those devices through hands-on and virtual simulation exercises. Upon completion, you will have a fundamental understanding of computer networking and the protocols that make it all work and will have the knowledge to pursue the Cisco CCENT certification.

INSTRUCTOR: Garret Arcoraci
After 17 years at Xerox Corporation, Garret decided to pursue a career in education. After graduation, he was asked by one of his professors to adjunct for evening classes; through this experience, he discovered how much he enjoys teaching and how rewarding it can be. Two years later, he was fortunate enough to accept his current position as a lecturer in the college of Information Sciences and Technology at RIT.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

This course offers an introduction to computer graphics. You’ll take lessons on image selection, adding layers, using effects, filters, painting blending, and color modification. Each new technique will build on past ones in order to prepare you for the end product: a website of your choice. This could be used in tandem with other Pre-College courses.

INSTRUCTOR: Joshua Foster
Joshua was born in Utica, NY, and graduated from Whitesboro High School. He is a graduate of St. John Fisher College and Nazareth College, and is certified in both biology and as an educational technology specialist. He was a three-sport varsity athlete, played for the St. John Fisher men’s soccer team, and competed in the Empire 8 conference. As a certified educational technology specialist, he has used very current programs in order to improve the education of students. One of these programs is Photoshop, which is used almost weekly in his classroom. Currently employed at Eastridge High School, he teaches Living Environment, Advanced Human Biology, and IB Biology. He also coaches the girls’ varsity soccer team at Eastridge as well as a girls’ team for the Irondequoit Soccer Club. 

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

Imagine being a lawyer, assigned to your first big case—and it’s a homicide! Whether you’re the prosecutor or defense attorney, you have a big job ahead of you. The defendant’s fate is, in many ways, in your hands. How will you prepare your case? Gather evidence? Prepare witnesses? Are there specific procedures you’ll need to use in the courtroom? How do real attorneys prepare and try their cases? In this course, you’ll work as a team to learn about basic criminal trial procedures and eventually prepare and present a mock murder trial. Most importantly, through planning, strategizing, and arguing, you’ll learn that trial lawyers live and work in an exciting world.

INSTRUCTOR: Dave Caiazza
Dave Caiazza is a retired City School District teacher. He taught high school Criminology classes for over 10 years there. Though not a lawyer, he has many connections with the police and legal communities and meets with convicted killers at Attica Prison each year. He is currently an adjunct professor of adolescent education at Nazareth College. He has enjoyed teaching “May It Please the Court” at Rochester Scholars for several years.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

In this course, you will develop the analytical skills necessary to discuss, analyze, and contextualize music in all forms. From Stravinsky’s riot inducing Rite of Spring to Jimi Hendrix’s polemic Woodstock rendition of the Star Spangled Banner, this class moves through a vast survey of music that touches on each major era in the canon of Western music. Scandal, intellectual debate, and even murder are topics at hand! Course content is built primarily on readings, listening activities, and group discussions, all employed to cover the historical context, technological advancements, stylistic trends, and analytical processes employed by the composer. Additionally, this class will take a visit to EARS (the Eastman Audio and Research Studios) to get a demo of the studio and see where the contemporary composer works.

INSTRUCTOR: Miles Friday 
Born in Seattle, WA., Miles Jefferson Friday is currently pursuing an MA in composition at the Eastman School of Music where he studies with primarily with Ricardo Zohn-Muldoon. Miles has won numerous awards and honors including the ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Award, the Kuttner String Quartet Composition Competition, a Hutton Honors College College Creative Grant, the Robert Avalon Young Composer Competition, and the Dallas Festival of Modern Music Emerging Composer Award. Holding a BM from the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, Miles has studied composition with Don Freund, Sven David Sandstrom, Aaron Travers, P.Q. Phan, and Claude Baker in addition to spending additional time at IRCAM as part of their manifeste academie.

RO | 11–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

Interested in the new developments of stem cell research? This course will introduce you to basic principles in stem cell science, highlight the role of stem cell dysfunction in disease, and discuss the potential therapeutic applications of stem cells. Additional topics will include the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and gene engineering. You will experience first hand what it takes to grow embryonic stem cells and how to manipulate and analyze them using gene transfer and immunofluorsecent technology. During the course, you will also visit the University of Rochester cGMP stem cell laboratory. Please note that all students must complete a lab safety training course for handling biosafety level 2 reagents.

INSTRUCTOR: Chris Proschel 
Dr. Chris Proschel is an associate professor in the Department of Biomedical Genetics and acting director of the University of Rochester pluripotent stem cell laboratory. As a neurobiologist, Dr. Proschel is using embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells to study the role of astrocytes in diseases of the brain, such as Vanishing White Matter diseases and Parkinson’s Disease. By exploiting new stem cell technologies, his lab is also developing cell therapeutic approaches that use astrocytes, a specific type of glial cell, for the treatment of traumatic and degenerative diseases of the brain. The Proschel lab is part of the University of Rochester Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Institute.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

For over a hundred years, animation has amused, fascinated, and moved viewers, producing some of the most successful films of all time. Yet, animation remains marginalized within the study of film. Through an examination of popular animated films such as Toy Story, Ghost in the Shell, Akira, and Spirited Away, this course brings animation to the center of film studies, analyzing its particular style, form, and aesthetics. It will introduce the basic concepts of film analysis with a focus on animation. While analyzing animation’s aesthetics, we will also attend to the mode’s treatment of class, gender, and race, paying close attention to the historical and cultural context in which the film emerged. Films discussed include works by Cohl, Disney, Jones, Bakshi, Shirow, and Miyazaki.

INSTRUCTOR: Patrick Sullivan
Patrick is a PhD candidate in the Visual and Cultural Studies department. He graduated from George Mason University with an BA in English, focusing on film and media studies. Patrick’s research interests include film philosophy, globalization, cinematic representation of space and time, Thai cinema, early cinema, and film sound.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

For more than a hundred years, movies and other visual media have shocked audiences, moved them to tears, and transfixed them in philosophical contemplation. But why do visual media affect us so powerfully? In this course, you will explore the forms, functions, and history of cinematic language. You’ll watch, analyze, and discuss classics like Citizen Kane (1941), Psycho (1960), and The Shining (1980), contemporary blockbusters like The Matrix (1999) and The Dark Knight (2008), television shows like Breaking Bad (2008–2013) and Arrested Development (2003–2005, 2013), and assorted music videos and commercials. In a “capstone” project, you will analyze a short scene from a visual object of your choosing. By learning why moviemakers use visual language, you will gain a richer appreciation for visual media.

INSTRUCTOR: Daniel Singleton
Dan has been a self-proclaimed movie nut for more than a decade. After graduating from Kennesaw State University in 2011, he enrolled at the University of Rochester to pursue his MA in English and Film (which he completed in 2012) and a PhD in the same subjects (in progress). He has taught with the Pre-College Program for three summers, and he has also taught college courses at St. John Fisher College and the University of Rochester.

RO | 11–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

Imagine you are a neurologist walking into your patient’s room. He introduces himself to you as if meeting you for the first time, claiming he’s never seen you before. But you have met with him every day for the past month! Your next patient complains that she has a terrible cramp in her hand that won’t go away, but here’s the catch—that hand was amputated after an accident years ago. This course will use these and other patient cases as a basis for learning about healthy and abnormal brain functions. Classes will consist of case discussions, activities and experiments, and interactive lectures to introduce you to neuroscience in a fun and engaging environment.

INSTRUCTOR: Elizabeth Belcher 
Elizabeth Belcher is a PhD student at the University of Rochester where she studies newborn neurons in adult brains. She is interested in the brain disruptions that contribute to neurological disorders. She graduated from the University of Pittsburgh with a degree in neuroscience and psychology. Elizabeth was formerly terrified of skiing but is now an addict, has been a program director of a summer camp, and enjoys teaching almost as much as eating ice cream (and that’s really saying something).

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

As seen through the eyes of an actual participant, history comes alive in this American military science course. This course will cover strategies, battles, twists, turns, surprises, and details not gone over in a typical history class. Fort Ticonderoga, Saratoga, Bulge, Vietnam, and Persian Gulf are just a few of the battles that may be covered. History pivots on battles—come join us in this call to arms!

INSTRUCTOR: William Dykstra
William teaches physics and astronomy at a local school district. He has certifications in physics with a Masters in Education. William has a deep passion and interest for physics, astronomy, sports, music, military and history. It is the latter on which he decided to create this uniquely styled course.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

What’s it like to be a physician? What does it take to become a doctor? Meet with practicing physicians, medical students, and other experts. Explore hands-on medical procedures, examine equipment, and discuss medical ethics and the role of the physician. Learn what it takes, academically, to prepare for medical school, and how to decide if medicine is the right path for you. Examine the current pros and cons of being a doctor.

Please note: A $25 lab fee applies.

INSTRUCTOR: University of Rochester Medical Center Faculty

 

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

This course explores how people self-identify and examines other cultures. Using topics such as interracial dating, this course will be interactive and discussion-based. Discussions will include reading personal narratives and using popular media. Assignments will give you a taste of the social sciences, including anthropology, psychology, and sociology. You will conduct research, explore surrounding neighborhoods, and interact with people of different backgrounds through interviews. There will be an educational field trip and you’ll present in class based on your personal experiences.

INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Jessica Guzmán-Rea
Dr. Jessica Guzmán-Rea is a native Rochesterian and Director of the Burgett Intercultural Center at the University of Rochester. She obtained her EdD from the University of Rochester, MSSW from Columbia University, BA in Sociology and Spanish from Case Western Reserve University, and is a licensed master social worker. Dr. Guzmán-Rea speaks both Spanish and Portuguese and believes that in order to cultivate global citizens, we need to have open and honest dialogue with others.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

Have you ever wanted to build your own camera and take photographs? In this class, you will learn to create Cyanotype prints and Pinhole Camera prints. All of our tools will be handmade from common materials. After this class, you will take home multiple images and a pinhole camera that you constructed.

INSTRUCTOR: Michael Leonard
Michael Leonard is a practicing artist and educator in the Rochester, NY area. He also serves as the studio manager for the Sage Art Center at the University of Rochester. Michael’s artistic practice focuses on social and emotional stigma and the ways that it affects human interaction. Michael received is BFA in Photographic Illustration from Rochester Institute of Technology in 2001 and his MFA in Visual Studies from the Visual Studies Workshop in 2010.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

What impacts your health? Is it the hospitals and health care delivery system? But what if you are never sick? This dynamic and interactive course will explore the ways the world impacts our health. We will discuss current events and policy changes, including the Affordable Care Act, and practice advocacy while learning ways individuals can make a difference. We will observe the environment “hands-on” and identify barriers to health. We will study Rochester, learning about population health data and identify hot spots of poor health and consider why. We will explore the impact that poverty has on health care. We will meet leaders from important agencies in Rochester that influence health, including the local health department, Foodlink, St. Joseph’s Neighborhood Center, legislators, etc. We will discuss current films, including Fed Up and Unnatural Causes to think about issues of culture and race. Students will learn about career options beyond medicine that impact the population’s health. This will be a fun, engaging, and active time of learning!

INSTRUCTOR: Theresa Green 
Theresa Green, PhD, MBA, is Assistant Professor in Public Health Sciences at URMC and is the Director of Community Health Policy and Education at the University’s Center for Community Health (CCH). Dr. Green coordinates the Community Health Improvement Planning process and implementation for Monroe County, NY, conducted jointly between the four hospital systems and the Department of Public Health. In addition, Dr. Green is the co-director of the Health Systems theme for the undergraduate medical curriculum and is the director of the required fourth year Community Health Improvement Course. Before coming to Rochester, Dr. Green was the Director of Community Health Planning for the Berrien County Health Department in Michigan and was instrumental in the passage of the Berrien County Clean Indoor Air Regulation, childhood lead poisoning policy, and initiatives addressing health disparity and social justice. Prior to that, she worked clinically in anesthesia for 20 years.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

This course is designed to provide you with a basic knowledge of human anatomy as it applies to the most common sports injuries. We’ll cover basic anatomy, injuries to the integumentary system, the head, neck, and spine, major joints, and major muscles. Along with the anatomy of the injury, you’ll learn about prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation techniques. This is a project-based course that will involve research and presentations.

INSTRUCTOR: Joshua Foster
Joshua was born in Utica, NY, and graduated from Whitesboro High School. He is a graduate of St. John Fisher College and Nazareth College, and is certified in both biology and as an educational technology specialist. He was a three-sport varsity athlete, played for the St. John Fisher men’s soccer team, and competed in the Empire 8 conference. As a certified educational technology specialist, he has used very current programs in order to improve the education of students. One of these programs is Photoshop, which is used almost weekly in his classroom. Currently employed at Eastridge High School, he teaches Living Environment, Advanced Human Biology, and IB Biology. He also coaches the girls’ varsity soccer team at Eastridge as well as a girls’ team for the Irondequoit Soccer Club. 

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

This course is for you if you’re interested in Japanese language through not only traditional Japanese culture but also anime, movies, food, and more! In an age where international relations is crucial to economic growth and homeland security, being bilingual can open doors to many high-profile job opportunities. As the relationship between the United States and Japan strengthens, the need to learn Japanese becomes greater. In this course, you will learn how to construct Japanese sentences and carry on simple conversations with others in Japanese. You will also have opportunities to experience interesting hands-on cultural activities. The class will watch Japanese films and anime every day to check grammar and help you learn authentic daily vocabulary.

INSTRUCTOR: Shizuka Hardy
Shizuka is a Senior Lecturer in Japanese for the department of Modern Languages and Cultures. She has been teaching conversational courses for intermediate and advanced level since 2011. She has also taught Elementary Japanese from the fall of 2014. Shizuka is experienced in teaching all levels, from high school students who are interested in Japanese language and culture to business people who are planning to go on a business trip to Japan.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

This problem-solving course will introduce you to medical science and pathology and you’ll solve a series of medical cases. We will explore a series of diseases and learn to think through a differential diagnosis. The structure of the course will involve short interactive lectures followed by participation in case studies employing the problem-based-learning process used in many medical schools.

 

INSTRUCTOR: University of Rochester Medical Center Faculty

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

Life is stressful! Come learn all about how our bodies and minds react to stress and how to manage it through this hands-on course! We’ll start by talking about the role of stress in your life, then gain a better understanding of the physiological and psychological bases of stress, and finish with interactive workshops on how to reduce stress in your daily life. Through this course, you will learn how to trace the stress response from a stressor in your environment (e.g., an upcoming college application deadline) to your brain’s neurological response, to your body’s fight or flight reaction. We will also debunk the myth that stress is purely negative by learning about ways to use stress to your advantage! Finally, we will learn about easy stress-management techniques, which will include going into the community to meet with experts on how to use mindfulness and yoga techniques to reduce stress and anxiety.

INSTRUCTOR: Jessica Keith 
Jessica Keith is a graduate student pursuing her PhD in Clinical Psychology at the University of Rochester. Her research focuses on how stress impacts academic and social functioning in children and adolescents. She has clinical and teaching experience working with undergraduate students at the University of Rochester, including through working as a therapist at the University Counseling Center and as a teaching assistant for several undergraduate psychology courses.

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

What’s it like to be a physician? What does it take to become a doctor? Meet with practicing physicians, medical students, and other experts. Explore hands-on medical procedures, examine equipment, and discuss medical ethics and the role of the physician. Learn what it takes, academically, to prepare for medical school, and how to decide if medicine is the right path for you. Examine the current pros and cons of being a doctor.

Please note: A $25 lab fee applies.

INSTRUCTOR: University of Rochester Medical Center Faculty

RO | 9–12 | 2-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

Game changers are the ones that make a difference in the world. Learn how to develop ideas that will create a better future. Practice how to think creatively and to lead others in ways that will make the world work better. Gather the skills that will convince colleges, and eventually employers, how effectively you will perform.

This combination of classroom and field expeditions uses the powerful history and amazing natural beauty of the Lower Falls Gorge on the Genesee River to help you explore the techniques used throughout centuries of challenges to create opportunities that changed America. The impact of science, history, innovations and social movements provides a powerful learning perspective for pre-college students. It serves as a portal to develop the independent thinking and leadership skills which diverse cultures and successful leaders need today and for the future.

Plan to improve your critical thinking skills and your leadership abilities in practical, interactive settings that will deliver unmistakable results.

Class members will become:
• Better leaders
• Persuasive story tellers
• Creative thinkers
• Confident problem-solvers
• Individuals that bosses will want to hire

Activities include:
• Expeditions to the Lower Falls in Rochester
• Educational hikes on the Genesee Riverway Trail
• Classroom exercises offering fresh, new ways to approach learning
• Guest speakers from the community

INSTRUCTORS: Bill Self & George Payne
 The Lower Falls Foundation in Rochester, NY, is a social impact enterprise whose goal is to have the Lower Falls of the Genesee River and the nearby communities designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Bill Self and George Payne, the instructors, co-founded the Lower Falls Foundation to educate the community about the rich cultural, environmental and historical importance of the Lower Falls, and to bring improved economic prosperity to the disadvantaged neighborhoods around the gorge.

ROCHESTER SCHOLARS, SESSION B: July 24–28, 2017

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30am-11:30am

Through stimulating lectures, interactive labs, and informative field trips, this class introduces you to the many disciplines of engineering. You will get an overview of the necessary tools for analysis and problem solving and will use your creativity, energy, and interpersonal skills while participating in several in-class design projects. Additionally, you will learn the importance of mathematics, science, and technology in everyday engineering situations. By the end of the course, you will have a better-defined idea of engineering, its requirements, and your options for a future within this field.

INSTRUCTOR: Soyoun Kim
Soyoun received a B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Rochester. She is currently a PhD candidate in chemical engineering, focusing her research on micro-contact transfer printing using shape memory polymer. She has been teaching the Careers in Engineering course since Summer of 2016.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30am–11:30am

This course will introduce the student to the Raspberry Pi. Devices are increasingly becoming smaller while simultaneously becoming more powerful, allowing the end-user to do more with them. One such device is the Raspberry Pi, which is slightly larger than a credit card but powerful enough to do many of the things people do with a desktop computer, like word processing, games, and even using it as a multimedia device for your television. Through hands-on exercises, students will learn about the Linux operating system, programming using Python, and will install Minecraft and discover many of the other capabilities of the Raspberry Pi.

Please note, a $25 lab fee applies.

INSTRUCTOR: Garret Arcoraci 
After 17 years at Xerox Corporation, Garret decided to pursue a career in education. After graduation, he was asked by one of his professors to adjunct for evening classes; through this experience, he discovered how much he enjoys teaching and how rewarding it can be. Two years later, he was fortunate enough to accept his current position as a lecturer in the college of Information Sciences and Technology at RIT. 

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 9:00 am–12:00 pm

This one-week course for middle and high school students will provide insight into the diverse world of electronic music, with an emphasis on basic audio technology and software. Students will learn to record, edit, and produce CDs of their own performances, which can be used for auditions, scholarship application, and general promotion. Students will learn about recording technology, editing, sequencing, and mixing audio as well as how to set up a sound system. Students will use audio software including Audacity, Logic Pro, and various plugins and effects, and they will become familiar with a range of audio hardware including MIDI controllers, mixers, microphones, interfaces, and pre-amps. The course will be an introduction to a wide variety of applications in computer music, which will hopefully equip students with resources for successful implementation of music technology in their own careers. No prior knowledge of recording or programming is needed to be successful in this course, though basic computer skills are encouraged. This class is taught at the Eastman School of Music campus.

INSTRUCTOR: Eastman School of Music Faculty

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 9:00 am–12:00 pm

This five-day intensive Wind Ensemble Workshop is for students currently in grades 8–12. In addition, college students who reside in the Rochester area and are music majors or minors may enroll in the class without cost to assist and perform with the students. The class is offered to Level 5 and 6 NYSSMA soloists on all wind and percussion instruments. A concert on Friday evening (July 28, 2017 at 7:30 pm in Kilbourn Hall) will represent the culmination of the week’s exploration of some contemporary and traditional works for wind ensemble or symphonic band. Instrumentation may be limited in certain sections, so early enrollment is encouraged. This class is taught at the Eastman School of Music campus.

INSTRUCTOR: Bill Tiberio

Bill Tiberio has been an instrumental music teacher for 32 years, 28 of which were at Fairport High School. At Fairport, he conducts the concert band, sophomore band, two jazz ensembles, jazz combos, pit orchestra for musicals, and chamber woodwind ensembles. His Fairport concert band has received seven consecutive Gold With Distinction awards in NYSSMA Level 6. He also teaches woodwind lessons in the district in grades 5 through 12. His work at ECMS includes summer study with the High School Wind Ensemble, the “Maiden Voyage” Basic Improvisation camp, and the Middle School Jazz camp. During the school year, he directs the Music Educators Jazz Ensemble. He founded the ECMS-sponsored Music Educators Wind Ensemble.

Bill conducts the University of Rochester Wind Symphony and directs the UR Jazz Ensemble. He teaches one of the Ithaca College Jazz Lab Bands, and is now on the faculty of the jazz department at Ithaca. His current assignment includes two jazz lab bands.

Bill is a frequent guest conductor for honor concert bands and jazz ensembles throughout New York State and has  conducted at SUNY Fredonia and Lawrence University, Wisconsin. He has served as a clinician for the Eastman School of Music JazzFest and is an All-State woodwind adjudicator and band pageant clinician.

In 2013, Bill was selected as one of 200 quarterfinalists out of 30,000 applicants in the first ever national Grammy Music Educator Awards. Other awards and honors include selection as the RPO Music Educator Award in April 2003, induction into the Fairport High School Alumni Wall of Fame, selection as Fairport High School Commencement Speaker in 1993, Fairport High School faculty-nominated Teacher of the Year award in 1996, University of Rochester Excellence in Secondary Teaching Award in 1994, Downbeat Magazine awards for student jazz ensembles in 1995 and 1997, and a nomination for a Disney American Teaching Award in 1999.

Bill is active as a professional woodwind player in the Rochester area. As a saxophonist, Bill performs with the Bill Tiberio Band, and the Bill Welch Band, and his groups have each recorded professional CDs. His own band’s latest record, Thanksgiving, was released in 2014.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

Are you ready to explore the virtual world of game design? This course provides an overview of mobile gaming development using GameSalad Creator. Topics covered include: history of the mobile game industry, mobile platforms, tools and genres; design, art and programming for mobile devices; ICloud integration; production team roles, responsibilities and cycles; play testing; Xcode integration; virtual goods; analytics; storyboarding; accelerometer response; user interface design; level layout; multiplayer integration; social media notifications and the future of the mobile game industry

INSTRUCTOR: Aaron Frohm
Aaron Frohm is a technology education teacher at Pittsford Mendon High School. He graduated from SUNY Oswego in 2013 with a Bachelor’s in Technology Education and is currently working towards his Master’s at RIT. Aaron has taught pre-engineering courses, game development, graphic design, transportation, and photography. Each year he looks forward to new opportunities to expand learning in the classroom for students in all of his classes.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

If you are curious to understand how and why “nanotechnology” allows precise and effective tumor treatment and can shrink big devices onto a single chip, then this course is just for you! In this course, you will learn the fundamentals of nanotechnology via hands-on activities. You will design and make different types of nanomaterials, including nanoparticles for drug delivery, hydrophobic and hydrophilic thin films, and anti-microbial nano-solutions. Using fundamentals of microfluidics, you will engineer min-portable devices for multiple simultaneous analyses. You will visit the UR-Nano facility and learn the workings of a ‘clean room’ and microscopes, which allow you to visualize atoms and molecules.

INSTRUCTOR: Kanika Vats 
Among the various sub-disciplines of science, biomedical engineering has fascinated Dr. Vats immensely because of its remarkable potential to positively influence the living world. During her doctoral study at Pennsylvania State University and post-doctoral training at the University of Rochester, she acquired extensive practical training in biomedically relevant fields such as biomedical nanotechnology, biomaterial design and characterization, and the assessment of cell-biomaterial interactions. Currently, she designs and runs a vibrant, hands-on undergraduate laboratory teaching program in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Rochester.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

Nursing is the largest workforce in the health care setting. The roles that nurses fulfill in the hospital, public health, research, and advanced practice roles are vital to the success of a patient’s health. This course will show you what it takes to be a nurse. With engaging discussions and interactive exercises, you will learn about the profession’s foundations and specialties, the history and future of nursing, and potential careers that might interest you. Come explore if nursing is for you.

 

INSTRUCTOR: Katharine Hiltunen
Kathy Hiltunen currently teaches in the Masters in Health Care program at the URMC School of Nursing. Prior to that she helped create and then teach in taught at RIT in the Masters in Health Administration program for 10 years. Clinically, Kathy has practiced both as a public health nurse and more recently school nurse. She also worked for 27 years at Excellus BCBS in various leadership roles, overseeing case management, disease management, and utilization management programs.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

In this course, you will learn about the fundamental particles and forces that make up the universe and you will conduct experiments to observe these forces in action. You’ll get an introduction to basic concepts in quantum mechanics, high-energy physics, astrophysics, and cosmology, and simple computer programming and data analysis. In conjunction with the lectures, you will observe local and astrophysical sources of high-energy particles using a cloud chamber and will construct a detector to measure the lifetime of the fundamental particle known as the muon. Knowledge of algebra is required, but prior knowledge of programming is not.

INSTRUCTOR: Segev BenZvi
Segev is an assistant professor of physics at the University of Rochester who is interested in the origin of high-energy particles from beyond the solar system. His work takes him to remote but beautiful high-altitude deserts and mountaintops, which are optimal locations for building astrophysical particle detectors. He has a BA in physics from the University of Chicago, a PhD from Columbia University, and he worked as a research scientist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

Jump into the world of crime scene investigation (CSI) as you study how to process evidence from a homicide. During the investigation, you will study fingerprints, hairs, fibers, powders, and fur to determine the perpetrator of this ultimate whodunit. Throughout this intense week, you will familiarize yourself with the scientific method, microscopes, teamwork, and lab safety. Your group will work diligently to find the killer by the end of the week.

INSTRUCTOR: Dennis Mucenski
Dennis was destined to become a forensics teacher from the first time he watched Law and Order and then CSI. He developed a forensics class at Pittsford Mendon High School and then started co-teaching a forensics course for teachers at College of the Atlantic. He is a published author, does webinars for Ward’s Natural Science, and a three-day conference on how to incorporate forensics into school curricula each July. Dennis also teaches an undergrad and graduate course on the science of crime scene investigation at St. John Fisher College.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

This class introduces the many disciplines of finance, what to expect during academic training at a university level, and potential career paths. Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be an investment banker, a financial advisor, or a private equity, hedge fund, or real estate investor? Examine the pros and cons of various career paths within the world of finance. Learn about different types of investments, build your own hypothetical investment portfolio, speak with professionals in the industry, and more. This class will also introduce several aspects of personal finance (things we wish we thought about when entering college).

INSTRUCTORS

Jake Conway
Jake has served as Manager of Investment Research at the University of Rochester since December 2013, helping manage the endowment and sourcing new investment ideas/managers. Priro, he worked for Ashford Advisors, LLC, a multi-family investment office, as an Investment Analyst tasked with identifying best-in-class investment managers across asses classes (2010–2013). Jake holds a B.A. in Corporate Finance from St. John Fisher College and is a CFA Charterholder.

Rob Rahbari
Rob has served as an Investment Officer at the University of Rochester since 2013, helping manage the endowment. Prior, he helped manage client assets in J.P. Morgan’s Private Bank (2010–2013); helped analyze investment managers at two different funds-of-hedge funds (2004-2009); led business development efforts for a startup software company (2000–2003) and represented investment management firms as an attorney at Skadden Arps and Weil Gotshal (1996-2000 and 2003-2004). Rob holds a Juris Doctorate from University of Chicago and a BA from University of Michigan.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

This course covers what you will not learn in traditional science and history courses. You will see how science (primarily physics, chemistry, etc.) influenced the years during and surrounding the Second World War. Intentionally or accidentally, history pivots on scientific achievements and breakthroughs, from the famous experiments to the little known. From all perspectives (Axis and Allied powers, civilians, and military), physics and chemistry played a major role in the development of WWII. You will never view science and life the same way again. Basic algebra skills may be used occasionally.

INSTRUCTOR: William Dykstra
William teaches physics and astronomy at a local school district. He has certifications in physics with a Masters in Education. William has a deep passion and interest for physics, astronomy, sports, music, military and history. It is the latter on which he decided to create this uniquely styled course.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 8:30 am–11:30 am

What’s it like to be a physician? What does it take to become a doctor? Meet with practicing physicians, medical students, and other experts. Explore hands-on medical procedures, examine equipment, and discuss medical ethics and the role of the physician. Learn what it takes, academically, to prepare for medical school, and how to decide if medicine is the right path for you. Examine the current pros and cons of being a doctor.

Please note: A $25 lab fee applies.

INSTRUCTORS: University of Rochester Medical Center Faculty

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

Do you ever wonder how polar bears survive in the cold? Or how snake venom actually kills prey? Or how bats can see if they are “blind as a bat?” Or how some animals never drink water? The answers to these questions lie in basic animal physiology. The animal kingdom encompasses several million species, all of which are adapted to their particular environments. This course will use a combination of lectures and fun hands-on activities to teach you more about animals. You will learn how animals’ functions and bodily processes allow them to live in their vastly different ecosystems. By the end of the course, you will be able to impress others by quickly identifying all sorts of fun facts about animals, including where they live and what they eat.

INSTRUCTOR: Stacy Ruvio
Stacy earned a BS in biology from SUNY Geneseo in 2005. She received her PhD in biochemistry from the University of Buffalo in 2010, where her dissertation project was in the field of neuroscience. She is currently a post-doctoral research assistant in the Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy at the University of Rochester. Stacy has also been a teaching docent at the Buffalo Zoo since 2008.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

In this course, you will explore the world of electronics and microcontrollers using the popular Arduino platform to design and build interactive objects and environments. The course teaches the basics of electronics and programming using a hands-on, “learn by doing” approach. If you’re more experience, you can work on more complex projects independently.

INSTRUCTOR: Josh Romphf
Josh Romphf is the Programmer in the Digital Humanities Center at Rush Rhees Library (University of Rochester). He holds an MA in Film and Media Preservation from the University of Rochester / the L. Jeffrey Selznick School of Film Preservation. He specializes in web development, 3D modeling, video encoding, preservation solutions, and physical computing.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm-4:00 pm

This course teaches you the underlying physiology of crucial human organ systems and the process of recording the biological signals that dictate how they perform. You will learn about vital signs like blood pressure, heart rate, and electrical signals produced by the muscles and heart. You will also learn to interpret and integrate these signals with biological processes and diseases.

INSTRUCTOR: Kanika Vats
Among the various sub-disciplines of science, biomedical engineering has fascinated Dr. Vats immensely because of its remarkable potential to positively influence the living world. During her doctoral study at Pennsylvania State University and post-doctoral training at the University of Rochester, she acquired extensive practical training in biomedically relevant fields such as biomedical nanotechnology, biomaterial design and characterization, and the assessment of cell-biomaterial interactions. Currently, she designs and runs a vibrant, hands-on undergraduate laboratory teaching program in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Rochester.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

Do you wonder what it’s like to be a chemical engineering student at Rochester, and how chemical engineering differs from chemistry or other engineering professions? Chemical engineering is a multidisciplinary field with challenging careers in industrial processing, pharmaceuticals, materials science, product development (from food to nano-materials), and manufacturing. In this course, you’ll explore these topics through short daily lectures on alternative energy, reaction engineering, fluid dynamics, and polymer synthesis. You’ll also participate in demonstrations and enriching hands-on laboratory exercises. This course is recommended for highly motivated rising juniors and seniors.

INSTRUCTOR: Rachel Monfredo
Rachel Monfredo is a Lecturer and Senior Technical Associate in Chemical Engineering. She came to engineering sideways—after a BA degree in psychology from Yale University, she received an MA in American art history at the University of Delaware and worked at the Boston MFA program for six years. While there she became interested in materials science, and returned to Boston University to get an M.S in manufacturing engineering/material science, and then went to University of Texas, Austin to work on the electromagnetic railgun for eight years. Rachel works with freshmen through seniors in the undergraduate laboratories; her current research focuses on engineering education.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

This course is an introduction to vector calculus and focuses on curves, planes, and surfaces. In your daily life, you can see these objects everywhere and use them to illustrate many physical problems. At the end of the course, you should be able to work with vectors and have a precise idea of how to parametrize a surface from its sketch or vice versa. The course doesn’t require any prerequisites except high school algebra (especially polynomials) and is great for you if you’re interested in science and/or engineering.

INSTRUCTOR: Yesim Demiroglu
 Yesim Demiroglu is a Ph.d. candidate in Mathematics at University of Rochester. She got her M.A. degree from the University of Rochester in 2014 and proceeded with her graduate studies. Her research interests are very widespread, but primarily it can be summarized as (spectral) graph theory, combinatorics, algebra and differential geometry. Currently, she is working on her thesis and also serving as the Academic Programming Officer of the Graduate Student Association at the University of Rochester.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

This interactive course will give you an accurate and up-to-date overview of all the fields in astronomy and astrophysics. We will focus on concepts such as: stars and stellar evolution, galaxies, black holes, and gravitational waves. By the end of the week, you will have a grasp of core astronomy concepts and theories through fun and exciting activities. No Math background necessary.

INSTRUCTOR: Jacob Lange 
Jacob Lange is a PhD candidate at Rochester Institute of Technology under Dr. Richard O’Shaughnessy. His research involves parameter estimation of gravitational wave sources by comparing directly to numerical relativity simulations. He completed his Master’s level thesis this past summer and is continuing to his PhD dissertation. He obtained a dual B.S. degree in Physics and Astronomy/Astrophysics in 2014 from Florida Institute of Technology.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

This course is designed to help you understand the elements of effective public speaking and improve your own oral communication skills. The class will emphasize writing and performance skills and help you develop your individual speaking style and overcome nervousness and stage fright.

INSTRUCTOR: Peter Iglinski
Peter Iglinski a science press officer at the University of Rochester and an adjunct public speaking instructor at Nazareth College. He also runs his own business as a communications consultant and is working on his master’s degree in linguistics at the University of Rochester. Before changing careers in 2010, Peter worked at WXXI Radio as news director, executive producer, and senior correspondent.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

Jump into the world of crime scene investigation (CSI) as you study how to process evidence from a homicide. During the investigation, you will study fingerprints, hairs, fibers, powders, and fur to determine the perpetrator of this ultimate whodunit. Throughout this intense week, you will familiarize yourself with the scientific method, microscopes, teamwork, and lab safety. Your group will work diligently to find the killer by the end of the week.

INSTRUCTOR: Dennis Mucenski
Dennis was destined to become a forensics teacher from the first time he watched Law and Order and then CSI. He developed a forensics class at Pittsford Mendon High School and then started co-teaching a forensics course for teachers at College of the Atlantic. He is a published author, does webinars for Ward’s Natural Science, and a three-day conference on how to incorporate forensics into school curricula each July. Dennis also teaches an undergrad and graduate course on the science of crime scene investigation at St. John Fisher College.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

Learn more about quantum physics through demonstrations, lectures, and experiments. You’ll participate in a series of mini-lectures and demonstrations about the basic phenomena of quantum physics. The mini-lectures will require only a math background in algebra. Basic quantum mechanics covered will include quantum tunneling, quantum superposition, and two-particle quantum entanglement. The demonstrations will include a series of optics experiments such as the quantum eraser, optical interferometry, generation if the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox (aka “spooky action at a distance”, and Bell’s inequality.

 

INSTRUCTOR: Andrew Jordan
Andrew, a Texas native, has a BS in physics and mathematics from Texas A&M University. He received his doctorate in theoretical physics from the University of California, Santa Barbara. He did post-doctoral research at the University of Geneva, Switzerland, and also worked as a research scientist at Texas A&M. He is currently an assistant professor of physics at the University of Rochester. His research has been featured in Nature News and New Scientist magazine.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

What is it like to be a dentist, orthodontist, pediatric dentist, prosthodontist, periodontist, or oral surgeon? This course will focus on the ever-changing field of oral health and the high demands for dentists to meet the needs of local, national, and international patient populations. You’ll explore hands-on dental procedures, examine the latest equipment, and take a close look at the skills and educational requirements necessary to become an oral health professional. You will learn how to conduct an oral examination and make diagnostic plaster models of teeth. You’ll meet with dentists pursuing careers as faculty, researchers investigating basic sciences and translational arenas, and dental specialists working in diverse and emerging areas of treatment, including dental implants and cosmetic dentistry. You’ll visit the ambulatory care dental unit and the Center for Oral Biology at the University’s Medical Center.

 

INSTRUCTOR: Mary Pistilli
Mary is a Dental Hygienist with over twenty years experience in clinical, school based dental programs and community outreach programs at the University of Rochester’s Eastman Institute for Oral Health that collaborates with the Rochester City School District and the community at large. She coordinates and uses initiative to work with the Rochester City School District and outside agencies to provide more widespread care for children in the community. As a clinician, educator and recruiter, Mary has a diversity of skills and a versatile background working in various environments such as Hillside Children’s Center, Pre-school children, High School students, and adults. She has experience as a Preceptor, Oral Health Project Counselor, guest speaker on Hillside Family Forum and Project Manager for a research grant. Mary is a graduate of Old Dominion University with Bachelor of Science Degree in Dental Hygiene – Cum laude.

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

What’s it like to be a physician? What does it take to become a doctor? Meet with practicing physicians, medical students, and other experts. Explore hands-on medical procedures, examine equipment, and discuss medical ethics and the role of the physician. Learn what it takes, academically, to prepare for medical school, and how to decide if medicine is the right path for you. Examine the current pros and cons of being a doctor.

Please note: A $25 lab fee applies.

INSTRUCTOR: University of Rochester Medical Center Faculty

RO | 9–12 | 1-wk 1:00 pm–4:00 pm

In this course, we will discuss famous moral dilemmas from contemporary life, politics, philosophy, and movies, and try to solve them. Should President Truman have authorized dropping the bomb on Japan? Should you push an innocent person in front of a train if it would save other lives? Should the passengers on the ferry in the film The Dark Knight have pressed the button, destroying a ship of convicts to save themselves from the Joker? You will discuss and debate questions like these on teams in a Bowl-style format, make short group presentations, and play card games that illustrate answers to tough questions about justice.

INSTRUCTOR: Kyle Blanchette

 

TASTE OF COLLEGE

TASTE OF COLLEGE
11–12 | UR | Int’l | 4-wk
Commuter students only. Residential option not available for A1 session.

With the Taste of College program, students will get a jump-start on their college career. This program allows students to earn college credit and study among Rochester undergraduates. The classes motivate students to explore subjects typically reserved for study on a collegiate level. Courses are offered during the University’s fall, spring, and summer academic semesters, and credits are transferable to most colleges and universities.

 

Please note:

  • On-campus housing is not available during the A1 Summer Session.
  • First-time students are only permitted to take one TOC course.

CREDIT COURSES

Following are the Summer 2017 class offerings during the University of Rochester’s Taste of College A1 Session. These courses do not have any prerequisites.

  • 19th-Century Literature: Poetry, Politics, and the Environment
  • Abnormal Psychology
  • Adolescent Development
  • Cinematic Shakespeares
  • Contemporary Dance: Context and & Practice
  • Critically Queer
  • Foundations of Cognitive Science
  • History of Rock Music
  • Immigration and Ethnicity in the United States
  • Introduction to CAD and Drawing
  • Introduction to Comparative Politics
  • Intorduction to Drawing
  • Introduction to Linguistic Analysis
  • Introduction to Music Documentaries
  • Introduction to Music Theory (Ability to read music is required)
  • Introduction to Philosophy
  • Neural Foundations of Behavior
  • Psychology of Gender
  • Rethinking Nature: Environmentalism in the 20th-Century United States
  • World Dance: Movement as Culture

Additional Summer 2017 class offerings through the University of Rochester are available online. Please note that other courses (not listed above) may require prerequisites.

View course schedules and class descriptions by University Semesters.

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition for non-matriculated students is $868.00 per credit hour.

Learn more about tuition and fees.

Please note: For the summer sessions, 100% tuition is due at the time of registration.

Employees: If you are a University of Rochester employee, your children may be eligible for tuition benefits. Learn more.

APPLICATION PROCESS

  • Submit the completed TOC application at least 30 days before the start of class.
  • Schedule an interview with the Pre-College Programs office. (Pre-College Programs Skype: UR_precollege)
  • Allow up to 14 days for the application to be reviewed. Decisions will be sent via mail or email.
  • Admitted students will submit payment in the form of a credit card, check, or tuition waiver.
  • Attend orientation.

ORIENTATION

Newly admitted TOC students must attend an orientation offered by the Pre-College Programs office. During orientation, students will be given a tour of campus, including their classroom location, and be taken to the ID office, parking office, and bookstore. Please note the following information:

Obtaining an ID card: Your ID card will allow you to check books out of the library, attend campus events, etc.

Parking Pass: All parking on campus requires a parking pass. Learn more.

Books: Most classes require books. These can be purchased in person at the bookstore or online.

DROPPING/ADDING COURSES

The deadline for dropping a course or adding a new course is the end of the fourth week of classes. All of these changes must be submitted on an official Drop/Add form to the Office of Pre-College Programs. Students must obtain the instructor’s signature for all courses added after the first day of classes. Courses dropped during the first four weeks of classes will be deleted entirely from the official record; however, you will be financially responsible following the refund schedule below.

Any additional tuition for an added course is to be paid at the time the change is made. The deadline for withdrawing from a course is the last day of the eleventh week of the semester. Courses from which non-matriculated students withdraw will appear on the grade report and transcript with a “W” and the week of withdrawal.

Tuition Refund Schedule: If you are dropping or withdrawing from a course, you may only be refunded a portion of the tuition paid. Learn more.

REQUESTING A TRANSCRIPT

Taste of College students will need to request their own transcripts if they require a copy (for personal use or for high school records).

Transcripts can be requested through a student’s Blackboard account or directly through the Office of the Registrar.

TASTE OF COLLEGE
11–12 | UR | Int’l | 6-wk
Commuter students only. Residential option not available for A2 session.

With the Taste of College program, students will get a jump-start on their college career. This program allows students to earn college credit and study among Rochester undergraduates. The classes motivate students to explore subjects typically reserved for study on a collegiate level. Courses are offered during the University’s fall, spring, and summer academic semesters, and credits are transferable to most colleges and universities.

 

Please note:

  • On-campus housing is not available during the A2 Summer Session.
  • First-time students are only permitted to take one TOC course.

CREDIT COURSES

Following are the Summer 2017 class offerings during the University of Rochester’s Taste of College A2 Session. These courses do not have any prerequisites.

  • Adolescent Development
  • Beginning American Sign Language (Online course)
  • Calculus I
  • Chemistry Concepts, Systems, and Practice I (Completion of high school chemistry course required)
  • French in Focus: Intensive Elementary French
  • Intensive Elementary Chinese (Course runs May 22-July 14)
  • Intensive Elementary Spanish
  • Introduction to Computer Science
  • Introduction to Programming
  • Introduction to Psychology
  • Linear Algebra with Differential Equations (Student must have exhausted all available high school math classes)
  • Medical Anthropology
  • Principles of Biology II
  • Principles of Economics (Completion of a course in calculus is recommended)
  • Reasoning and Writing in the College
  • Recreational Graphics
  • Russian in Russia (Course runs May 27-June 25)
  • Rushin’ Through Russia: Intensive Elementary Russian
  • Web Design and Development

Additional Summer 2017 class offerings through the University of Rochester are available online. Please note that other courses (not listed above) may require prerequisites.

View course schedules and class descriptions by University Semesters.

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition for non-matriculated students is $868.00 per credit hour.

Please note: For the summer sessions, 100% tuition is due at the time of registration.

Employees: If you are a University of Rochester employee, your children may be eligible for tuition benefits. Learn more about tuition.

APPLICATION PROCESS

  • Submit the completed TOC application at least 30 days before the start of class.
  • Schedule an interview with the Pre-College Programs office. (Pre-College Programs Skype: UR_precollege)
  • Allow up to 14 days for the application to be reviewed. Decisions will be sent via mail or email.
  • Admitted students will submit payment in the form of a credit card, check, or tuition waiver.
  • Attend orientation.

ORIENTATION

Newly admitted TOC students must attend an orientation offered by the Pre-College Programs office. During orientation, students will be given a tour of campus, including their classroom location, and be taken to the ID office, parking office, and bookstore. Please note the following information:

Obtaining an ID card: Your ID card will allow you to check books out of the library, attend campus events, etc.

Parking Pass: All parking on campus requires a parking pass. Learn more about parking.

Books: Most classes require books. These can be purchased in person at the bookstore or purchased online.

DROPPING/ADDING COURSES

The deadline for dropping a course or adding a new course is the end of the fourth week of classes. All of these changes must be submitted on an official Drop/Add form to the Office of Pre-College Programs. Students must obtain the instructor’s signature for all courses added after the first day of classes. Courses dropped during the first four weeks of classes will be deleted entirely from the official record; however, you will be financially responsible following the refund schedule below.

Any additional tuition for an added course is to be paid at the time the change is made. The deadline for withdrawing from a course is the last day of the eleventh week of the semester. Courses from which non-matriculated students withdraw will appear on the grade report and transcript with a “W” and the week of withdrawal.

Tuition Refund Schedule: If you are dropping or withdrawing from a course, you may only be refunded a portion of the tuition paid. Learn more about refunds.

REQUESTING A TRANSCRIPT

Taste of College students will need to request their own transcripts if they require a copy (for personal use or for high school records).

Transcripts can be requested through a student’s Blackboard account or directly through the Office of the Registrar.

TASTE OF COLLEGE
RO | 11–12 | UR | Int’l | 4-wk

With the Taste of College program, students will get a jump-start on their college career. This program allows students to earn college credit and study among Rochester undergraduates. The classes motivate students to explore subjects typically reserved for study on a collegiate level. Courses are offered during the University’s fall, spring, and summer academic semesters, and credits are transferable to most colleges and universities. During the B1 session, students have the option to live on campus, or commute to and from campus on their own.

 

Please note: First-time students are only permitted to take one TOC course.

CREDIT COURSES

Following are the Summer 2017 class offerings during the University of Rochester’s Taste of College B1 Session. These courses do not have any prerequisites.

  • A Film’s Odyssey, From Trick Cinematography to Special Effects
  • Al-Andalus: Journeys Through Muslim Spain
  • Beyond Bansky, Graffiti/Street Art
  • Introduction to American Politics
  • Introduction to International Relations
  • Moral Problems
  • Prep For College Chemistry
  • Social and Emotional Development
  • Social Psychology and Individual Differences
  • Tap Dance in American History: Context & Practice
  • The Power of Fright: Gothic and Horror in Literature and Culture
  • Theories of Personality and Psychotherapy

Additional Summer 2017 class offerings through the University of Rochester are available online. Please note that other courses (not listed above) may require prerequisites.

View course schedules and class descriptions by University Semesters.

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition for non-matriculated students is $868.00 per credit hour. For students who wish to live on campus, there will be an additional charge for room and board.

Learn more about tuition and fees.

Please note: For the summer sessions, 100% tuition is due at the time of registration.

Employees: If you are a University of Rochester employee, your children may be eligible for tuition benefits. Learn more.

APPLICATION PROCESS

  • Submit the completed TOC application at least 30 days before the start of class.
  • Schedule an interview with the Pre-College Programs office. (Pre-College Programs Skype: UR_precollege)
  • Allow up to 14 days for the application to be reviewed. Decisions will be sent via mail or email.
  • Admitted students will submit payment in the form of a credit card, check, or tuition waiver.
  • Attend orientation.

ORIENTATION

Newly admitted TOC students must attend an orientation offered by the Pre-College Programs office. During orientation, students will be given a tour of campus, including their classroom location, and be taken to the ID office, parking office, and bookstore. Please note the following information:

Obtaining an ID card: Your ID card will allow you to check books out of the library, attend campus events, etc.

Parking Pass: All parking on campus requires a parking pass. Learn more about parking.

Books: Most classes require books. These can be purchased in person at the bookstore or purchased online.

DROPPING/ADDING COURSES

The deadline for dropping a course or adding a new course is the end of the fourth week of classes. All of these changes must be submitted on an official Drop/Add form to the Office of Pre-College Programs. Students must obtain the instructor’s signature for all courses added after the first day of classes. Courses dropped during the first four weeks of classes will be deleted entirely from the official record; however, you will be financially responsible following the refund schedule below.

Any additional tuition for an added course is to be paid at the time the change is made. The deadline for withdrawing from a course is the last day of the eleventh week of the semester. Courses from which non-matriculated students withdraw will appear on the grade report and transcript with a “W” and the week of withdrawal.

Tuition Refund Schedule: If you are dropping or withdrawing from a course, you may only be refunded a portion of the tuition paid. Learn more about refunds.

REQUESTING A TRANSCRIPT

Taste of College students will need to request their own transcripts if they require a copy (for personal use or for high school records).

Transcripts can be requested through a student’s Blackboard account or directly through the Office of the Registrar.

TASTE OF COLLEGE
RO | 11–12 | UR | Int’l | 6-wk

With the Taste of College program, students will get a jump-start on their college career. This program allows students to earn college credit and study among Rochester undergraduates. The classes motivate students to explore subjects typically reserved for study on a collegiate level. Courses are offered during the University’s fall, spring, and summer academic semesters, and credits are transferable to most colleges and universities. During the B2 session, students have the option to live on campus, or commute to and from campus on their own.

 

Please note: First-time students are only permitted to take one TOC course.

CREDIT COURSES

Following are the Summer 2017 class offerings during the University of Rochester’s Taste of College B2 Session. These courses do not have any prerequisites.

  • Calculus I
  • Linear Algebra with Differential Equations (Student must have exhausted all available high school math classes)

Additional Summer 2017 class offerings through the University of Rochester are available online. Please note that other courses (not listed above) may require prerequisites.

View course schedules and class descriptions by University Semesters.

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition for non-matriculated students is $868.00 per credit hour. For students who wish to live on campus, there will be an additional charge for room and board.

Learn more about tuition and fees.

Please note: For the summer sessions, 100% tuition is due at the time of registration.

Employees: If you are a University of Rochester employee, your children may be eligible for tuition benefits. Learn more.

APPLICATION PROCESS

  • Submit the completed TOC application at least 30 days before the start of class.
  • Schedule an interview with the Pre-College Programs office. (Pre-College Programs Skype: UR_precollege)
  • Allow up to 14 days for the application to be reviewed. Decisions will be sent via mail or email.
  • Admitted students will submit payment in the form of a credit card, check, or tuition waiver.
  • Attend orientation.

ORIENTATION

Newly admitted TOC students must attend an orientation offered by the Pre-College Programs office. During orientation, students will be given a tour of campus, including their classroom location, and be taken to the ID office, parking office, and bookstore. Please note the following information:

Obtaining an ID card: Your ID card will allow you to check books out of the library, attend campus events, etc.

Parking Pass: All parking on campus requires a parking pass. Learn more about parking.

Books: Most classes require books. These can be purchased in person at the bookstore or purchased online.

DROPPING/ADDING COURSES

The deadline for dropping a course or adding a new course is the end of the fourth week of classes. All of these changes must be submitted on an official Drop/Add form to the Office of Pre-College Programs. Students must obtain the instructor’s signature for all courses added after the first day of classes. Courses dropped during the first four weeks of classes will be deleted entirely from the official record; however, you will be financially responsible following the refund schedule below.

Any additional tuition for an added course is to be paid at the time the change is made. The deadline for withdrawing from a course is the last day of the eleventh week of the semester. Courses from which non-matriculated students withdraw will appear on the grade report and transcript with a “W” and the week of withdrawal.

Tuition Refund Schedule: If you are dropping or withdrawing from a course, you may only be refunded a portion of the tuition paid. Learn more about refunds.

REQUESTING A TRANSCRIPT

Taste of College students will need to request their own transcripts if they require a copy (for personal use or for high school records).

Transcripts can be requested through a student’s Blackboard account or directly through the Office of the Registrar.

GIRLSGETMATH@ROCHESTER: July 31–August 4, 2017

CO | 10–11 | 1-wk Full Day

This is a five-day non-residential mathematics pilot program open to rising 10th- and 11th-grade students from the greater Rochester, NY, area.

GirlsGetMath@Rochester encourages young women to explore, and invites them to excel in, the mathematical sciences. Accomplished professional women enthusiastic about serving as career models as well as scientific mentors lead the program. Potential topics include cryptography, the mathematics of voting, image processing, prime numbers and factoring, and fractals. 

Program Goals:

  • Show high school women that the study of mathematics can be exciting, beautiful, and useful
  • Build confidence in students’ mathematical knowledge through engaging and expert mathematical instruction
  • Introduce high school students to a variety of career opportunities in which sophisticated mathematical ability plays a key role
  • Emphasize the strategic role mathematics plays for success in STEM careers
  • Provide participants with a support group and expert mentors who are successful undergraduates, graduate students, postdocs, and professionals from the STEM workforce
  • Have a positive influence on the way students view their mathematical interest and ability

INSTRUCTORS: Amanda Tucker & Jamie Juul
Amanda Tucker is on the faculty at the University of Rochester in the Department of Mathematics and has a longstanding interest in working with and encouraging high school students to get and stay interested in mathematics. Jamie Juul, a former graduate student from Rochester, is now on the faculty at Amherst College and shares Professor Tucker’s passion for enlivening mathematics for high school students. The faculty organizers will be joined by undergraduate and graduate student who will serve as teaching fellows in the program.