Taste of College Summer Sessions

Following are current class offerings during the University of Rochester’s summer semester B1, scheduled for June 29–July 27, 2015:

  • Prep for College Chemistry
  • Social and Emotional Development
  • Abnormal Psychology
  • Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Poetry
  • The Detective Film
  • European Avant-Garde Cinema
  • Society and Culture in Modern Latin America: A Film Perspective
  • Imagine the Future: History of SciFi
  • Intro to Philosophy
  • Campaigns & Elections: Global Perspective
  • Intro to International Politics
  • Religion & Chinese Society

View course descriptions and course schedules.

Following are current class offerings during the University of Rochester’s summer semester B1, scheduled for June 29–August 7, 2015:

  • Introduction to Philosophy
  • Principles of Biology
  • French in Focus: Intensive Beginning French

View course descriptions and course schedules.

 

Rochester Scholars Session A: July 13–24, 2015

What’s it like to be a physician? What does it take to become a doctor? Meet with practicing physicians, medical students, and other experts. Explore hands-on medical procedures, examine equipment, and discuss medical ethics and the role of the physician. Learn what it takes, academically, to prepare for medical school, and how to decide if medicine is the right path for you. Examine the current pros and cons of being a doctor. Please note: A $25 lab fee applies.

Instructors: University of Rochester Medical Center Faculty

Imagine being a lawyer, assigned to your first big case—and it’s a homicide! Whether you’re the prosecutor or defense attorney, you’ve got a big job ahead of you. The defendant’s fate is, in many ways, in your hands. How will you prepare your case? Gather evidence? Prepare witnesses? Are there specific procedures and exhibits you’ll need to use in the courtroom? How do real attorneys prepare and try their cases? In this course, you’ll work as a member of a team to learn about basic criminal trial procedures, and prepare and present a mock murder trial. Most importantly, through planning, strategizing, and arguing, you’ll learn that trial lawyers live and work in an exciting world. Field trips to Attica State Penitentiary and the Monroe County Court will be included.

dave caiazzaInstructor: Dave Caiazza

Dave Caiazza is a retired City School District teacher. He taught high school criminology classes for over ten years there. Though not a lawyer, he has many connections with the police and legal communities and meets with convicted killers at Attica Prison each year. He is currently an adjunct professor of adolescent education at Nazareth College. He has enjoyed teaching “May It Please the Court” at Rochester Scholars for several years.

In this course, students will learn about the fundamental particles and forces that make up the Universe and will conduct experiments to observe these forces in action. The course will introduce students to basic concepts in quantum mechanics, high-energy physics, astrophysics, and cosmology, and simple computer programming and data analysis. In conjunction with the lectures, students will observe local and astrophysical sources of high-energy particles using a cloud chamber, and will construct a detector to measure the lifetime of the fundamental particle known as the moon. Knowledge of algebra is required, but prior knowledge of programming is not.

Instructor: Segev BenZvi

Segev is an assistant professor of physics at the University of Rochester who is interested in the origin of high-energy particles from beyond the solar system. His work takes him to remote but beautiful high-altitude deserts and mountaintops, which are optimal locations for building astrophysical particle detectors. He has a BA in physics from the University of Chicago, a PhD from Columbia University, and he worked as a research scientist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Learning about bones, muscles, joints, and movement has never been more fun! Through movement, poetry, and numerous hands-on activities, students will identify and explore the function of muscles and bones in their bodies. No dry memorization here! Students will plunge into the subject of anatomy by putting those bones and muscles into action. Specially designed kinesthetic activities will be used to embody lessons. This class is excellent for those interested in health sciences, biology, kinesiology, physical therapy, dance, or massage therapy.

Instructor: Anne Harris Wilcox MFA

Anne Harris Wilcox MFA, is a senior lecturer at the University of Rochester, and the President of the NYS Education Association. She is a NYS certified K–12 teacher and the Director of the Present Tense Dance Company. In the past twenty years, Anne has taught dance for numerous college, university, and private sector programs. In 2013, Anne formed Active Learning Games, LLC, a company that creates kinesthetic educational activities for grades K–12.

Have you ever wondered why you get sick? Or, better yet, how you get better? Our bodies’ ability to protect themselves is astounding. Immunology research is more exciting than ever due to technological advances in the last decade, and this course will introduce students to these techniques. In this course, students will learn about the cells of the immune system that help defend the body from pathogens, and how common pathogens, such as the flu, make you sick. The goal of the course is to provide a basic understanding of infection and immunity, including an overview of terms and concepts of immunology.

Instructor: Taylor Moon

Taylor is a graduate student with Dr. Michael Elliott in the University of Rochester’s immunology department. She graduated from St. Lawrence University, majoring in biology with chemistry/Canadian studies minors. Prior to graduate school, Taylor acquired lab experience through a summer fellowship at SUNY Upstate and undergraduate research at St. Lawrence. After graduate school, she would like to teach at the undergraduate level. In her spare time, she enjoys riding her two horses, Ben and Duke.

Nursing is the largest workforce in the health care setting. The roles that nurses fulfill in the hospital, public health, research, and advanced practice roles are vital to the success of a patient’s health. This course will explore the history of the nursing profession, historical figures in the profession, and the impact they have had on health care. We will discuss the foundation of nursing practice, different and diverse nursing specialties, and the future of nursing in the ever-changing health care environment. Come explore if nursing is for you.

Learn more with the Pre-College class video: Nursing

Instructor: Shannon McCarthy-Leone

Mrs. McCarthy-Leone has been a nurse for 23 years with experience in critical care, high risk obstetrics, ambulatory women’s health, perianesthesia nursing, clinical informatics, and urgent care services. Obtaining a master’s in nursing education from Keuka College, she currently is a nursing faculty member at Finger Lakes Community College, and an adjunct clinical faculty member at the University of Rochester. Passionate about the nursing profession, Mrs. McCarthy-Leone is involved in the Finger Lakes Future of Nursing Coalition in New York State, the National League of Nursing, the Genesee Valley Nurses Association, the American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses, and the National Nursing Network Organization.

As seen through the eyes of an actual participant, history comes alive in this American military science course. This course will cover strategies, battles, twists, turns, surprises, and details not gone over in a typical history class. Fort Ticonderoga, Saratoga, Bulge, Vietnam, and Persian Gulf are just a few of the battles that may be covered. Earlier conflicts in time may be covered for context. History pivots on battles—come join us in this call to arms!

Instructor: William Dykstra

William teaches physics and astronomy at a local high school. His certifications are in physics with a master’s in education. He has a deep interest and passion for physics, astronomy, sports, music, military, and history. It is the latter on which he decided to create this uniquely styled course.

This course offers an introduction to computer graphics. It will include lessons on image selection, adding layers, using effects, filters, painting blending, and color modification. Each new technique will build on past ones in order to prepare for the end product: a website of the student’s choice. This end product could be used in tandem with other Pre-College courses. For example, if the student is taking Managing and Imagining your Future, they could create an online portfolio including their resume and other materials produced in that course.

joshua fosterInstructor: Joshua Foster

Joshua was born in Utica, NY, and attended Whitesboro High School. He is a graduate of St. John Fisher College with a B.S. in Biology and Secondary Education. Also, he obtained his Master’s Degree from Nazareth College, and is certified as an Educational Technology Specialist. As a certified educational technology specialist, he has used very current programs in order to improve the education of students. Currently employed at Eastridge High School, he teaches Living Environment, and IB Biology. He also coaches the girls’ junior varsity soccer team at West Irondequoit and serves as the Assistant Director of Coaching and a head coach for the Irondequoit Soccer Club.

We live in a world connected by technology. In the famous words of Albert Einstein, “It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has exceeded our humanity.” However, whether we agree with Einstein or not, technology is here to stay, and this course will focus on the technology that interconnects the entire world through the Internet. Students will explore the protocol that allows the Internet to work: TCP/IP. And on a much smaller scale, they’ll explore how information is transmitted across wired and wireless local area networks using the 802.3 and 802.11 standards. They will learn about switches and routers, the Cisco IOS, how to configure and connect those devices through hands-on and virtual simulation exercises. Upon completion, students will have a fundamental understanding of computer networking and the protocols that make it all work and will have the knowledge to pursue the Cisco CCENT certification.

garret arcoraciInstructor: Garret Arcoraci

After 17 years at Xerox Corporation, Garret decided to pursue a career in education. After graduation, he was asked by one of his professors to adjunct for evening classes; through this experience, he discovered how much he enjoys teaching and how rewarding it can be. Two years later, he was fortunate enough to accept his current position as a lecturer in the college of Information Sciences and Technology at RIT.

For more than one hundred years, movies have shocked audiences, moved them to tears of joy, sorrow, and anger, and transfixed them in philosophical contemplation or simple awe. But why do the movies affect audiences so powerfully? How do they achieve their effects? In this course, we will explore the forms, functions, and history of cinematic grammar. We will watch, analyze, and discuss such classic movies as Citizen Kane (1941), Psycho (1960), and The Shining (1980), and contemporary blockbusters like The Matrix (1999). In the process, we will learn why filmmakers use cinematic grammar and we will gain a deeper understanding of and richer appreciation for movies.

daniel singletonInstructor: Daniel Singleton

Daniel earned his BA in English at Kennesaw State University and his MA in English at the University of Rochester. A former English instructor at St. John Fisher College, he is currently working toward his PhD in English at the University of Rochester. This task requires him to watch many, many movies.

What’s it like to be a physician? What does it take to become a doctor? Meet with practicing physicians, medical students, and other experts. Explore hands-on medical procedures, examine equipment, and discuss medical ethics and the role of the physician. Learn what it takes, academically, to prepare for medical school, and how to decide if medicine is the right path for you. Examine the current pros and cons of being a doctor. Please note: A $25 lab fee applies.

Instructors: University of Rochester Medical Center Faculty

This problem-solving course is designed to introduce students to basic content in medical science and pathology which will be used in problem-solving sessions to solve a series of medical cases. We will explore a series of diseases and learn to think through a differential diagnosis. The structure of the course will involve short interactive lectures followed by participation in case studies employing the problem-based-learning process that used in many medical schools.

Learn more with the Pre-College class video: Medical Mysteries

Instructors: University of Rochester Medical Center Faculty

The goal of this course is to provide important academic, social, and self-reflective capital that young adults will need to successfully navigate decisions made in high school and the community in which they live. Résumés, autobiographies, mock interviews, college essays, time management, balancing athletics and academics in college, and much more will be explored through lecture, guest speakers, and tours of businesses/colleges.

Instructor: Joe Latimer

Joe has a bachelor’s from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, a master’s from Northeastern University, and is currently pursuing a second master’s from the University of Rochester. A native of central Massachusetts, Joe has been involved in the field of college admissions counseling for eighteen years, with an interest in early outreach to younger high school students to inspire them to be high achievers in their academic and co-curricular lives. In his spare time, Joe plays and coaches lacrosse, is an avid reader of The New York Times, and is a die-hard Yankees fan.

Shakespeare is not sacred. His work is meant to be seen, tasted, spoken, and tossed about. In this course, we will look at Shakespeare in performance. Initially, that will mean looking at scenes from a number of different takes on Shakespeare’s plays, including direct adaptations such as Kenneth Branagh’s Henry V, as well as looser adaptations, such as Ran, She’s the Man, and 10 Things I Hate About You. The goal of the class is to stop thinking about “Shakespeare’s” characters. We will discuss DiCaprio’s Romeo, McKellen’s Richard III, and Ethan Hawke’s Hamlet. Each performer does something new and unique with every role. By the end of the course, students will be claiming their own Shakespearean characters, and delivering their version of one of that character’s speeches.

Instructor: Scott O’Neil

Scott O’Neil is a PhD student at the University of Rochester focusing on Shakespearean drama. He previously earned an MA in English from St. Bonaventure University and a BS in English education from Towson University. Before graduate school, he spent three years as a sports writer in Maryland and four years as a high school English teacher. He also serves as a facilitator for the Folger Shakespeare Library, occasionally running workshops on teaching through performance.

How does history look, feel, and smell? What can everyday items teach us about people, places, and events from the past? This class invites students inside a treasure-laden archive where documents from history—from the ordinary to the extraordinary—are collected for safekeeping, study, and interpretation. Taught in the department of Rare Books, Special Collections and Preservation and Rush Rhees Library, this class will get to handle actual fragments of history like Fredrick Douglass’s handwritten speeches, Susan B. Anthony’s teacup, George Eastman’s personal photographs of his African safari and more. Visiting exhibitions in the River Campus Libraries as well as other local cultural institutions, we will begin learning the art of telling stories with “stuff”: assembling knowledge, ideas, texts, and things in meaningful ways that can educate and inspire the public. Gaining experience in storytelling, research, writing, exhibit layout and promotion, our culminating project with narrate a chapter of history through an original exhibition of our own design to share with the University of Rochester community and beyond.

abby glogower

Instructor: Abby Glogower

Abby Glogower is a PhD student in the University of Rochester’s program in visual and cultural studies. She has a BA in art history from Oberlin College and an MA in art history from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She has worked as a museum educator at the Brooklyn Museum in New York, the Mattress Factory Museum in Pittsburgh, and the Spertus Museum in Chicago. Abby also teaches a freshman writing seminar in Rochester’s Writing, Speaking and Argument Program called “Remembering the Future.” She co-curated the recent exhibition, “Nurturing Inquiry: Exploring Special Collections Research at the Rush Rhees Library.”

In an age where international relations is crucial to economic growth and homeland security, being bilingual can open doors to many high-profile job opportunities—political, educational, cultural, medical, and otherwise. As the relationship between the United States and Japan strengthens, the need to learn Japanese becomes greater. In this intensive Japanese course, students will learn to form some basic sentence patterns and carry simple but fun conversations with their peers. In addition, the class will view Japanese animations and dramas to enhance their ability to recognize words and phrases. Students will leave the class with a better understanding of how important bilingual speakers are in the business world, and will have a newfound appreciation for a different culture.

shizuka hardyInstructor: Shizuka Hardy

Shizuka is a Japanese language instructor for the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures. She has been teaching conversational Japanese classes for intermediate and advanced levels since 2011. She is experienced in teaching all levels, from high school students who are interested in Japanese language and culture to business people who are planning to go on a business trip to Japan.

The course would introduce students to a subsection of general biochemistry: metabolism. Metabolism is defined as the sum total of biochemical reactions occurring in each cell, but it is much more than that. The emergence of metabolism-related disorders is on the rise in the 21st century, and this course will strive to appreciate the foundation of such diseases as obesity and Type II diabetes. Students will gain an understanding of the metabolic underpinnings of these diseases as well as their basic regulation. They will have access to labs working on mouse models of obesity (mice reared on high fat diet) and get hands-on experience in designing experiments and collecting data. They will analyze biochemical parameters such as serum glucose and lipid profile and observe tissue sections under the microscope. The class will end with each student delivering a short report and presentation giving them a flavor of effective scientific communication as an integral part of research. At the end of the class, they will be able to not just appreciate the science behind obesity and Type II diabetes, but they will also adopt a healthy outlook to prevent these diseases with good standards of nutrition and lifestyle choices. It is recommended that students participating have background in biology or chemistry.

debamita chatterjeeInstructor: Debamita Chatterjee

Debamita has just completed her PhD degree in biology from the University of Rochester. She has earned her master’s degree from the University of Rochester and a previous master’s and bachelor’s degree from the University of Calcutta with summa cum laude. She is passionate about research in aging and metabolism with a special focus on metabolic diseases. In her spare time, she writes for “Science for the Public.”

This course is designed to provide students with a basic knowledge of human anatomy as it applies to the most common sports injuries. Units of study will cover basic anatomy, injuries to the integumentary system, the head, neck, and spine, major joints, and major muscles. Along with the anatomy of the injury, prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation techniques will be discussed. This is a project-based course that will involve research and presentations.

joshua fosterInstructor: Joshua Foster

Joshua was born in Utica, NY, and attended Whitesboro High School. He is a graduate of St. John Fisher College with a B.S. in Biology and Secondary Education. Also, he obtained his Master’s Degree from Nazareth College, and is certified as an Educational Technology Specialist. As a certified educational technology specialist, he has used very current programs in order to improve the education of students. Currently employed at Eastridge High School, he teaches Living Environment, and IB Biology. He also coaches the girls’ junior varsity soccer team at West Irondequoit and serves as the Assistant Director of Coaching and a head coach for the Irondequoit Soccer Club.

Ever wanted to build your own camera and take photographs? In this class, students will learn to create Cyanotype prints and Pinhole Camera prints. All of our tools will be handmade from common materials. After this class, students will be taking home multiple images and a pinhole camera that they constructed.

Instructor: Michael Leonard

Michael Leonard is a practicing artist and educator in the Rochester, NY area. He also serves as the studio manager for the Sage Art Center at the University of Rochester. Michael’s artistic practice focuses on social and emotional stigma and the ways that it affects human interaction.

This course explores how people self-identify and examines other cultures. Utilizing topics such as interracial dating, this course will be interactive and discussion-based. Discussions will include reading personal narratives as well as using popular media. Assignments will encourage students to have a taste of the social sciences including an introduction to anthropology, psychology, and sociology. Students will be able to conduct research, explore their surrounding neighborhoods, and interact with people of different backgrounds by conducting interviews. Students will then be asked to present in class based on their personal experiences.

Instructor: Dr. Jessica Guzmán-Rea

Dr. Jessica Guzmán-Rea is a native Rochesterian and Director of the Intercultural Center at the University of Rochester. She obtained her EdD from the University of Rochester, MSSW from Columbia University, BA in sociology and Spanish from Case Western Reserve University, and is a licensed master social worker. Dr. Guzmán-Rea speaks both Spanish and Portuguese and believes that in order to cultivate global citizens, we need to have open and honest dialogues with others.

Looking to be in a rock band, create a jazz combo, or sing in your local choir, but don’t know how to get started? Learn how to make music creatively by learning new songs in a variety of styles based on material you already know! Further areas covered include song writing and arranging, effective rehearsal techniques, how to put on a performance, understanding the music business, recording with Garage Band, and more. The course culminates in a live performance and/or recording by the groups formed and rehearsed during the week. Open to aspiring/intermediate/advanced instrumentalists and singers, as well as established groups.

Instructors: Alan Murphy & Christopher Teal

Instructors Chris Teal and Alan Murphy are active performers and educators in the Rochester area, playing regularly with the Mighty High and Dry, Violet Mary, Mitty & the Followers, Dave Rivello Ensemble, Steve Grills, and other freelance groups. Chris and Alan both hold MM degrees in jazz performance from the University of Rochester’s Eastman School of Music and Nazareth College (respectively).

 

Rochester Scholars Session B: July 27–31, 2015

What’s it like to be a physician? What does it take to become a doctor? Meet with practicing physicians, medical students, and other experts. Explore hands-on medical procedures, examine equipment, and discuss medical ethics and the role of the physician. Learn what it takes, academically, to prepare for medical school, and how to decide if medicine is the right path for you. Examine the current pros and cons of being a doctor. Please note: A $25 lab fee applies.

Instructors: University of Rochester Medical Center Faculty

This course will introduce the student to the Raspberry Pi. Devices are increasingly becoming smaller while simultaneously becoming more powerful, allowing the end-user to do more with them. One such device is the Raspberry Pi, which is slightly larger than a credit card but powerful enough to do many of the things people do with a desktop computer, like word processing, games, and even using it as a multimedia device for your television. Through hands-on exercises, students will learn about the Linux operating system, programming using Python, and will install Minecraft and discover many of the other capabilities of the Raspberry Pi. Please note: A $25 lab fee applies.

garret arcoraciInstructor: Garret Arcoraci

After 17 years at Xerox Corporation, Garret decided to pursue a career in education. After graduation, he was asked by one of his professors to adjunct for evening classes; through this experience, he discovered how much he enjoys teaching and how rewarding it can be. Two years later, he was fortunate enough to accept his current position as a lecturer in the college of Information Sciences and Technology at RIT.

Jump into the world of CSI as you study how to investigate a crime scene and process evidence from a homicide. During the investigation, students will study fingerprints, hairs, fibers, powders, and fur in order to determine the perpetrator of this ultimate whodunit. Throughout this intense week, students will familiarize themselves with the scientific method, microscopes, teamwork, and lab safety. Students will work diligently to find their group’s killer by the end of the week. An interest in science and forensics is recommended.

dennis muceskiInstructor: Dennis Mucenski

Dennis was destined to become a forensics teacher from the first time he watched Law and Order and then CSI. He developed a forensics class at Pittsford Mendon High School and then started coteaching a forensics course for teachers at College of the Atlantic. He is a published author, does webinars for Ward’s Natural Science, and a three-day conference on how to incorporate forensics into school curricula each July. Dennis also teaches an undergrad and graduate course on the science of crime scene investigation at St. John Fisher College.

Do you ever look up at the sky and wonder what makes up all of space and time? This introductory level interactive astronomy class will take students on a journey through space. Students will learn about the major components that make up our universe, such as stars, galaxies, and black holes. Students will also participate in fun activities to enhance their understanding of these topics.

Instructor: Triana Almeyda

Triana Almeyda is a graduate student at the Rochester Institute of Technology in astrophysical sciences and technology. Triana’s research focuses on the dusty torus that surrounds active galactic nuclei. She enjoys participating in various outreach activities that promote and teach the general public about current astronomy-based topics and research.

This course covers what you will not learn in traditional science and history courses! Students will see how science (primarily physics, chemistry, etc.) influenced and affected the years during and surrounding the Second World War. Intentionally or accidentally, history pivots on scientific achievements and breakthroughs, from the famous experiments to the little known. From all perspectives (Axis and Allied powers, civilians, and military), physics and chemistry played a major role in the development of WWII. Students will never view science and life the same way again. Basic algebra skills may be used occasionally.

Instructor: William Dykstra

William teaches physics and astronomy at a local high school. His certifications are in physics with a master’s in education. He has a deep interest and passion for physics, astronomy, sports, music, military, and history. It is the latter on which he decided to create this uniquely styled course.

Kill or be killed. Oppress or be oppressed. These are the types of choices that society often presents to us in the context of heated situations. This course will explore a third choice—peace through nonviolent action—through selected readings, videos, discussions, and hands-on activities. Students will be introduced to a perspective on nonviolence that integrates theory into practice. Through studying historical nonviolent movements in Rochester and around the world, students will have the opportunity to explore how they can use their unique gifts and passions to apply the principles of nonviolence in their homes, schools, and communities. This understanding will empower students to exercise their agency in more constructive, creative, and powerful ways, which will, in turn, improve their self-confidence as co-creators of this complex world.

Instructor: Joel Gallegos Greenwich

Joel Gallegos Greenwich is a Sproull Fellow from Brazil pursuing his PhD in human development at the Warner School of Education. His research interests revolve around nonviolence and positive youth development. When not in school, he loves performing close-up magic as a way to connect with people and, in doing so, foster a culture of nonviolence. He is passionate about encouraging others to explore and invest in their unique gifts so they may be used as tools for shaping a better world.

Language is an integral part of daily life. When researchers study this topic, there are many difficult questions (e.g., How do we get meaning out of a stream of sounds? How can we make a computer communicate successfully with a person?). While incorporating fun activities, this course will cover a brief overview of the broad questions of the field and highlight industry jobs outside of research.

Instructors: Frank Mollica & Elizabeth Shay

Frank Mollica is currently a graduate student in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at the University of Rochester. He managed the Psycholinguistics Lab at the University at Buffalo while completing his BA in linguistics and BS in psychology. He has also worked in industry as a computational linguist.

Elizabeth Shay is a graduate student in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at the University of Rochester. She has a BAS in Computer and Cognitive Sciences and a BA in linguistics from the University of Pennsylvania where she worked on research in semantics/pragmatics and computational modeling of language. She is continuing research in this field currently.

Through movement, music, and historic investigation, this course explores the roots of American jazz dance and its impact on contemporary movement vocabulary. This course will focuses on learning American vernacular movements from the beginning of the 20th century through movement of the ragtime and swing eras. Students will learn popular social dances and improvise to the jazz music of this time to help them generate their own movement vocabulary. Comparing contemporary vocabulary with American jazz vernacular allows students to connect past and present styles and develop an appreciation for the roots of jazz dance. Students will view vintage and present-day video footage, read essays from jazz dance scholars, and write and discuss the social and economic factors affecting the development of jazz.

Instructor: Anne Harris Wilcox MFA

Anne Harris Wilcox MFA, is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Rochester, and the President of the NYS Education Association. She is a NYS certified K–12 teacher and the Director of the Present Tense Dance Company. In the past twenty years, Anne has taught dance for numerous college, university, and private sector programs. In 2013, Anne formed, Active Learning Games, LLC, a company that creates kinesthetic educational activities for grades K–12.

Do you ever wonder how polar bears survive in the cold? Or how snake venom actually kills prey? Or how bats can see if they are “blind as a bat?” Or how some animals never drink water? The answers to these questions lie in the basic animal physiology! The animal kingdom encompasses several million species, all of which are adapted to their particular environments. This course will use a combination of lectures and fun hands-on activities to teach students more about animals. Students will learn how animal functions and bodily processes allow them to live in their vastly different ecosystems. By the end of the course, students will be able to look at an animal and quickly identify all sorts of fun facts about them, including where they live and what they eat. Students will be able to impress others with their new animal knowledge!

Instructor: Stacy Ruvio

Stacy earned a BS in biology from SUNY Geneseo in 2005. She received her PhD in biochemistry from the University of Buffalo in 2010, where her dissertation project was in the field of neuroscience. She is currently a post-doctoral research assistant in the Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy at the University of Rochester. Stacy has also been a teaching docent at the Buffalo Zoo since 2008.

Numerous groundbreaking inventions are inspired by the close observation of biological systems. We explore an example in bioengineering: the cochlea, our hearing organ. The cochlea is a biological microphone. It encodes acoustic vibrations into neural (electrical) signals. This class will teach the basic concepts of the acoustics, vibrations, the inner ear mechanics and physiology, and the working theory of the microphones. By learning the working principles of the cochlea and the microphone, students will understand the similarity and the difference between the cochlea and the microphone. The course will be comprised of lectures, hands-on experiments, and field trips to bioengineering laboratories. Students will assemble their own microphones and test their performances.

jong-hoon namInstructors: Jong-Hoon Nam

Jong-Hoon is an assistant professor in the mechanical and biomedical engineering departments at the University of Rochester. He has been studying the mechano-sensation in the inner ear. Currently, he teaches computational methods for graduate students and Engineering Mechanics II for undergraduates.

Chemical engineering is a multidisciplinary field with challenging careers in industrial processing, pharmaceuticals, materials science, product development (from food to nano-materials) and manufacturing. In this course, students will be introduced to core engineering concepts through short daily lectures on such topics as alternative energy, reaction engineering, fluid dynamics, and transport processes. Demonstrations will augment these concepts along with enriching hands-on laboratory exercises. Given the current world focus on climate change and the ever-growing demand for energy, there will be a strong emphasis on green energy topics. By the end of the course, the students should have a solid grasp of the undergraduate chemical engineering curriculum and potential career opportunities.

rachel monfredoInstructor: Rachel Monfredo

Rachel Monfredo teaches Introduction to Chemical Engineering.

 

 

 

wyatt tenhaeff

Instructor: Wyatt Tenhaeff

Professor Wyatt Tenhaeff received a BS from Oregon State University in 2004 and a PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2009, both in chemical engineering. Before coming to the University of Rochester, Dr. Tenhaeff spent three and a half years at Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a Weinberg Fellow and Staff Scientist. At ORNL, he worked on the development of electrolytes for solid state lithium batteries. His current research at the University of Rochester focuses on the development of novel electrochemical energy storage systems, but he has a strong interest in many green energy topics. This class will be co-taught by staff member Rachel Monfredo.

Dystopian literature portrays strange, negative possibilities of a world that could be. This course will explore segments of dystopian novels, including We, 1984, Brave New World, and V for Vendetta, and examples from films, such as V for Vendetta. How are governments structured in dystopian societies? How are religions treated? How is censorship enforced or depicted? What caused these societies to evolve in this manner? Beyond our discussion of fiction, we will look at parallels between these works and discuss any similarities in real societies of the past and present, including that of the Soviet Union, the United States, and others.

chris bierasinskiInstuctor: Christopher Bierasinksi

Christopher graduated from the University of Rochester in 2010 with a degree in Russian language and literature. He also studied at The Center for Russian Language at Saint Petersburg State University. At Rochester, Christopher studied literary theory, history, identity, language, and literature, including the works of Tolstoy, Chekov, Dostoevsky, Pushkin, Turgenev, Bulgakov, and more. After graduation, Christopher enrolled in an intensive language program at St. Petersburg State University, studying Russian Language and Culture. Christopher now works with students from Russia, Central Asia, and Eastern Europe for the office of Undergraduate Admissions.

In this Extended Essay Workshop, students will explore the criteria for the IB Extended Essay Assignment. Students will develop a focused research question that meets the requirements of IB, a collection of relevant, scholarly articles, and a working structured argument. The research and writing of the extended essay is approximately a 40-hour process; this workshop is the exploratory stage of that process.

joshua fosterInstructor: Joshua Foster

Joshua was born in Utica, NY, and attended Whitesboro High School. He is a graduate of St. John Fisher College with a B.S. in Biology and Secondary Education. Also, he obtained his Master’s Degree from Nazareth College, and is certified as an Educational Technology Specialist. As a certified educational technology specialist, he has used very current programs in order to improve the education of students. Currently employed at Eastridge High School, he teaches Living Environment, and IB Biology. He also coaches the girls’ junior varsity soccer team at West Irondequoit and serves as the Assistant Director of Coaching and a head coach for the Irondequoit Soccer Club.

Through stimulating lectures, interactive labs, and informative field trips, this class introduces the many disciplines of engineering, and what to expect during academic training at a university level. Students will be provided with an overview of the necessary tools for analysis and problem solving, and will be encouraged to use their creativity, energy, and interpersonal skills while participating in several in-class design projects. Additionally, students will learn the importance of mathematics, science, and technology in everyday engineering situations. By the end of the course, they will have a better-defined idea of engineering, its requirements, and their options for a future within this field.

alexander shestopalovInstructor: Alexander Shestopalov

Alex is an assistant professor of chemical engineering at the University of Rochester. He is pursuing research that focuses on the development of new unconventional fabrication and patterning techniques and the use of these techniques in preparation of functional micro- and nanostructured devices. At Rochester, he teaches a junior level class about chemical engineering thermodynamics and a graduate level class about biointerfaces.

This one-week course will provide insight into the diverse world of electronic music with an emphasis on basic audio technology and software. Students will learn to record, edit, and produce CDs of their own performances, which can be used for auditions, scholarship applications, and general promotions. Students will learn about recording technology, editing, sequencing, and mixing audio as well as how to set up a sound system. Students will use audio software including Audacity, Logic Pro, and various plugins and effects, and they will become familiar with a range of audio hardware including MIDI controllers, mixers, microphones, interfaces, and pre-amps. The course will be an introduction to a wide variety of applications in computer music, which will equip students with resources for the successful implementation of music technology in their own careers. No prior knowledge of recording or programming is needed to be successful in this course, though basic computer skills are encouraged. Limited enrollment. This class is held on the Eastman School of Music Campus.

Instructor: Christopher Chandler

Christopher Chandler is a composer of acoustic and electroacoustic music currently teaching at the Eastman Community Music School. His music frequently involves the use of technology, and he has been actively engaged in the electroacoustic music community for several years. He has been the music technology specialist in the Department of Music at the University of Richmond and has been a teaching assistant in Music Technology and Computer Music at Bowling Green State University, and in Composition and Computer Music at the Eastman School of Music. Additionally, Christopher has served as associate technical director of the Third Practice Electroacoustic Music Festival in Richmond, Virginia since 2008. In this capacity, he has been directly involved with presenting works for instruments and computer, dance, video, and stereo and multi-channel works for fixed media. His music has been performed by eighth blackbird, Ensemble Interface, the Argento Chamber Ensemble, and the Cleveland Chamber Symphony.

This is a workshop for rock guitarists eager to develop their skill and knowledge of the guitar. Students will work on developing better playing and practice techniques, improving reading and transcription skills, exploring a variety of approaches to improvisation, and gaining a greater familiarity with effects, amps, and other technical aspects of rock guitar gear. Students will focus on the work of classic rock guitarists such as George Harrison, Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, Ritchie Blackmore, Steve Howe, and others. There will also be introductory sessions on jazz, classical, finger-style, and other styles of playing. Students should be at the intermediate level, which means being able to play several songs or excerpts learned from a teacher, YouTube, or tabs. No music reading skills or background in music theory is required. Demonstration/Informal concert for friends and family will be offered on the last day of class. This class is held on the Eastman School of Music Campus.

jonathan covachInstructor: Jonathan Covach

John is the chair of the College Music Department at Eastman, a music theory professor at Eastman, and a music professor at the University of Rochester. He received his BM, MM, and PhD degrees from the University of Michigan. John has published dozens of articles on topics dealing with popular music, twelve-tone music, and the philosophy and aesthetics of music. He co-edited Understanding Rock (Oxford, 1997), American Rock and the Classical Tradition (Harwood, 2000), and Traditions, Institutions, and American Popular Music (Harwood, 2000). He also has a textbook, What’s That Sound? An Introduction to Rock Music (W. W. Norton & Co., 2006).

This five-day intensive Wind Ensemble Workshop is for students currently in grades 8-12. In addition, college students who reside in the Rochester area and are music majors or minors may enroll in the class without cost to assist and perform with the students. (College students do not need to be there every day of the camp.) The class is offered to Level 5 and 6 NYSSMA soloists on all wind, brass, and percussion instruments. A concert on Friday evening will represent the culmination of the week’s exploration of some contemporary and traditional works for wind ensemble or symphonic band. Instrumentation may be limited in certain sections, so early enrollment is encouraged. Concert will be held on the last day of class. This class is held on the Eastman School of Music Campus.

bill tiberioInstructor: Bill Tiberio

Bill Tiberio has over 26 years of experience in the field of public music education, and has been at Fairport (NY) High School for 23 years. He completed his undergraduate work at Ithaca College, where he majored in music education and clarinet. His master’s degree is from SUNY Fredonia in music education. At Fairport, Bill conducts the top Concert Band, two jazz ensembles, jazz combos, pit orchestras, chamber ensembles, and teaches woodwinds throughout the district. He is the former president of the NY State Chapter of the International Association of Jazz Educators, is on the faculty for the Eastman Community Music School, and the founder and director of the Hochstein School of Music summer jazz camp. He is the founder and conductor of the Eastman Community Music School High School Chamber Winds, and will be directing a Music Educators Jazz Ensemble there this year. He is also teaching at the Ithaca College School of Music in the jazz department. Bill was appointed in 2004 to conduct the University of Rochester Wind Symphony, and has been the director of the UR Jazz Ensemble since 2008.

Bill is a frequent guest conductor, clinician, and adjudicator for both jazz and concert honor groups and festivals throughout NY State. He is active in the Rochester music scene as a jazz saxophonist and woodwind player, and has had experience in all styles of jazz. Bill has performed with Fred Wesley, The Four Tops, the Temptations, Nestor Torres, Lou Gramm, Al Chez, Soul Stew, and the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, and has shared the stage with Chuck Loeb, the Yellowjackets, Eileen Ivers, Jesse Cook, Ken Navarro, the Rippingtons, Minde Abair, and Euge Groove. He is a founding member of the original contemporary soul group, The Bill Welch Band (www.BillWelchBand.com), and is the saxophonist in the Spiritus Christi Gospel Choir. His own band, the Bill Tiberio Band (www.billtiberioband.com), is active in the Rochester music scene and has performed twice at the Rochester International Jazz Festival. Bill’s groups have released six commercial CD recordings

This workshop for beginning and intermediate level harpists (high school to adult) provides individual and ensemble instruction, music theory, and orchestral repertory classes for pedal and lever harpists. Students must bring their own harps. Highlights include concerts and other performance opportunities with Eastman School faculty and guest artists. Concert will be held on the last day of class. This class will be held on the Eastman School of Music Campus.

nan gulloInstructor: Nan Gullo

Nan Gullo graduated from the Juilliard School of Music (where she studied with Marcel Grandjany), Penn State University (where she received a Med), and the Eastman School of Music (where she earned a DMA, studying harp with Eileen Malone and Kathleen Bride). She has been a winner of Concert Artists Guild with a New York City Town Hall debut. As a member of the Pittsburgh Symphony for six years, she toured the US, Europe, and the Middle East. She has toured the US as soloist with the Chicago Little Symphony and has given numerous solo and chamber music recitals.

While at Juilliard, she was the founding secretary of the American Harp Society and was the founder of the Central Pa. Chapter of the AHS. She has also served as president of the Rochester Chapter. Her collection of 18th- and 19th-century harp music is housed at the Eastman Sibley Music Library in Special Collections. The Historical Harp Society published her publications from this collection. She has written articles on teaching for “Music Journal.”

Gullo has taught at Penn State, Houghton College, and Roberts Wesleyan College. Currently she teaches studio harp at the Eastman Community Music School and directs two harp ensembles. She will direct the annual ECMS Harp Workshop in July. In 2007, she received the Jack L. Frank Award for excellence in teaching.

What’s it like to be a physician? What does it take to become a doctor? Meet with practicing physicians, medical students, and other experts. Explore hands-on medical procedures, examine equipment, and discuss medical ethics and the role of the physician. Learn what it takes, academically, to prepare for medical school, and how to decide if medicine is the right path for you. Examine the current pros and cons of being a doctor. Please note: A $25 lab fee applies.

Instructors: University of Rochester Medical Center Faculty

In this course, students will learn how to use either iMovie or Movie Maker to create personalized movies. These movies can be tied into a digital portfolio to promote the student in a positive and creative light for academic work, college admission, and/or professional advancement.

joshua fosterInstructor: Joshua Foster

Joshua was born in Utica, NY, and attended Whitesboro High School. He is a graduate of St. John Fisher College with a B.S. in Biology and Secondary Education. Also, he obtained his Master’s Degree from Nazareth College, and is certified as an Educational Technology Specialist. As a certified educational technology specialist, he has used very current programs in order to improve the education of students. Currently employed at Eastridge High School, he teaches Living Environment, and IB Biology. He also coaches the girls’ junior varsity soccer team at West Irondequoit and serves as the Assistant Director of Coaching and a head coach for the Irondequoit Soccer Club.

This course teaches students the underlying physiology of crucial human organ systems and the process of recording the biological signals that dictate how they perform. Students will learn about vital signs such as blood pressure, heart rate, and electrical signals produced by the muscles and heart. Students will also learn to interpret and integrate these signals with biological processes and diseases.

Kanika VatsInstructor: Kanika Vats

Among the various sub-disciplines of science, biomedical engineering has fascinated Dr. Vats immensely because of its remarkable potential to positively influence the living world. During her doctoral study at Pennsylvania State University and post-doctoral training at the University of Rochester, she acquired extensive practical training in biomedically relevant fields such as biomedical nanotechnology, biomaterial design and characterization, and the assessment of cell-biomaterial interactions. Currently, she designs and runs a vibrant, hands-on undergraduate laboratory teaching program in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Rochester.

This intensive workshop is designed for motivated high school rock musicians (grades 9–12) and focuses on rock music of the 1955–1990 period, with emphasis on the classic music of artists including the Beatles, Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, Yes, and many others. Students will participate in rock combos to build performance and aural skills and will learn about rock-specific music theory, history, and improvisation sessions. This workshop is especially well-suited to students who plan to pursue advanced study in music as well as those aspiring to a career in popular music. Please note: Open to guitarists, bassists, drummers, keyboardists, and vocalists at intermediate level or above. Please note: An audition music file will be required.

Learn more with the Pre-College class video: Eastman Classic Rock

jonathan covachInstructor: Jonathan Covach

John is the chair of the College Music Department at Eastman, a music theory professor at Eastman, and a music professor at the University of Rochester. He received his BM, MM, and PhD degrees from the University of Michigan. John has published dozens of articles on topics dealing with popular music, twelve-tone music, and the philosophy and aesthetics of music. He co-edited Understanding Rock (Oxford, 1997), American Rock and the Classical Tradition (Harwood, 2000), and Traditions, Institutions, and American Popular Music (Harwood, 2000). He also has a textbook, What’s That Sound? An Introduction to Rock Music (W. W. Norton & Co., 2006).

What do Albert Einstein, J.K. Rowling, and President Obama have in common? Teaching! Whether you are considering a career in education or in another field, you will end up teaching others at some point in life. This course is designed both for students considering careers in K–12 or higher education and those seeking practical teaching skills for informal use in the humanities or sciences. Through a variety of hands-on activities, we will explore how people learn, what motivates their learning, and ways to design and deliver engaging, inspirational lessons. The course culminates in a hands-on teaching experience with children in a low-stakes, judgment-free environment.

Instructor: Joe Hanson

Joe Hanson holds a BA in music education from Towson University, where he graduated summa cum laude. He received his MA in music education from the University of Rochester’s Eastman School of Music. Joe teaches Elements of Music at Rochester and also serves as the manager of music performance programs on the River Campus. He began as a percussionist but then switched to trombone performance and music history while he was an undergraduate. Josef’s MA thesis discusses the “development of a contextual Internet-based teaching application for beginning instrumental music instruction.”

What is it like to be a dentist or a dental specialist such as an orthodontist, pediatric dentist, prosthodontist, periodontist, or oral surgeon? This course will explore hands-on dental procedures, examine the latest equipment, and take a close look at the skills and educational requirements necessary to become an oral health professional. Students will learn firsthand how to conduct an oral examination and to make diagnostic plaster models of teeth for use in treatment planning. Students will meet with dentists who are pursuing careers as faculty in educational programs and with researchers working in the basic sciences or translational arenas. Dental specialists working in diverse and emerging areas of treatment, including dental implants and cosmetic dentistry, will interact with the students. There will be site visits taken to the ambulatory care dental unit and the Center for Oral Biology at the University’s Medical Center. The course will focus on the changing field of oral health and the high demands for dentists to meet the oral health care needs of local, national, and international patient populations.

Learn more with the Pre-College class video: Magic of Molars

Instructor: Clare Shaffer

Clare Shaffer holds a BSEd from SUNY Cortland and an MSEd from SUNY Brockport. She also has her New York State Health Education Teaching Certificate and New York State Dental Hygiene Teacher’s Certificate. Clare currently serves as the director of the Infection Control Program at the University of Rochester Eastman Dental Center. She was awarded the 2002 Excellence Award from the University of Rochester Medical Center Board.

In this course, we will discuss famous moral dilemmas from contemporary life, politics, philosophy, and movies, and try to solve them. Should President Truman have authorized dropping the bomb on Japan? Should you push an innocent person in front of a train if it would save other lives? Should the passengers on the ferry in the film The Dark Knight have pressed the button, destroying a ship of convicts to save themselves from the Joker? Students will discuss and debate questions like these on teams in a Bowl-style format, make short group presentations, and play card games that illustrate answers to tough questions about justice.

Instructor: Matthew Baddorf

Matthew is a PhD student in the philosophy department at the University of Rochester, where he plans to write his dissertation about moral knowledge and how we can acquire it. He graduated with a BA in philosophy from Covenant College, and when not worrying about moral dilemmas, he plays games (board and computer) and reads

Popular culture is becoming increasingly central to global social life. Through music, art, fashion, film, and the World Wide Web, popular culture shapes how we think about and view each other, the world around us, and ourselves. In this class, we will examine how popular culture affects our lives as well as what popular media and culture tell us about who we are individually and collectively. This course looks at how identity is visualized across six media categories: music, film, graphic novels and comics, fashion, literature, and contemporary visual art. Students will learn how to analyze different forms of popular culture from a visual perspective, “reading” film scenes, song lyrics, music videos, fashion designs, advertisements, and other forms of popular culture much like a text. Activities include discussion, peer-group work, and art projects.

tiffany barberInstructor: Tiffany Barber

Tiffany is currently a second-year PhD student in visual and cultural studies at the University of Rochester, where her research interests focus on race, gender, and performance.

This course provides opportunities for students to develop basic language skills that can be used in various activities and disciplines. The fundamentals of French pronunciation, grammar, and culture are presented through a balanced development of all four skills: listening, speaking, writing, and culture. Activities and assessments require students to synthesize and interact with the information, thereby honing inquiry and critical-thinking skills while building linguistic and cultural competency. This course is designed for students with little or no knowledge of French language and francophone culture.

Instructor: Ghislaine Radegonde-Eison

Ghislaine is a French national with 20 years of progressive professional experience in higher education and program and budget management, coordinating details for a multifaceted program and diverse student groups. Currently, she is a program manager at the University of Rochester. She has held teaching positions as a language instructor both at Summer University in Toulon, France, and at Language Intelligence in Rochester, NY. She is currently pursuing her doctorate in education at the Warner School of Education.

This course is designed to help students understand the elements of effective public speaking and to improve their own oral communication skills. The class will emphasize writing and performance. Special attention will be paid to overcoming nervousness and developing individual speaking styles.

Instructor: Peter Iglinski

Peter Iglinski a science press officer at the University of Rochester and an adjunct public speaking instructor at Nazareth College. He also runs his own business as a communications consultant and is working on his master’s degree in linguistics at the University of Rochester. Before changing careers in 2010, Peter worked at WXXI Radio as news director, executive producer, and senior correspondent.

How has the relationship between the US and Latin America evolved in the past two hundred years? In this course, students will explore two specific aspects of US/Latin American relations: diplomatic relations (e.g., the Monroe Doctrine, Cold War policies) and immigration. The class will take a hands-on approach to history and students will work daily with a variety of archival and primary source documents. There will also be some short readings assigned throughout the week. By the end of the week, students will be more familiar with US/Latin American relations, with accessing, evaluating, and using archival sources, and with applying critical reading and writing techniques.

Instructor: Molly Ball

Molly Ball is an Adjunct Professor of History at the University of Rochester. She completed her PhD at UCLA and moved to Rochester in 2013. but through her studies and interests, she had lived in South Carolina, Chile, Brazil, and Mexico. As a researcher, she specializes in modern Brazilian history and as a teacher, she has taught a variety of classes related to colonial and modern Latin American history.

Who knew that what we call “light” is so simple and yet so complicated all at the same time? Because light is responsible for our sense of sight, it’s not surprising that light is present in almost everything we experience on a day-to-day basis. This hands-on course will cover not just the basics of light but all the implications, possibilities, and characteristics it can manifest. Topics may include communications, radio, radar, infrared, vision, ultraviolet, X, Gamma, the eye, perception, colors, reflection, glasses, diffraction and interference, CDs, DVDs, Blu-ray, security systems, and fiber optics. Basic algebra skills may be used occasionally.

Instructor: William Dykstra

William teaches physics and astronomy at a local high school. His certifications are in physics with a master’s in education. He has a deep interest and passion for physics, astronomy, sports, music, military, and history. It is the latter on which he decided to create this uniquely styled course.

What is activism? How does an activist decide what’s worth fighting for? How do activists convince others to rally around a cause? How do activists keep going when the struggle takes longer than expected? This course provides students with the opportunity to explore these questions by discovering the life and times of Susan B. Anthony and her work as an activist for women’s rights. This hands-on class will take us on a journey using letters Anthony wrote, a visit to her home (and now museum), and a final project that asks students to consider: What did it mean to be an activist, and what does activism mean to you?

lori birrellInstructors: Lori Birrell & Angela Clark-Taylor

Lori Birrell is the historical manuscripts librarian at the University of Rochester, where she works with nineteenth- and twentieth-century collections. She is the co-founder of the Rochester Early Career Information Professionals, a group that fosters collaboration and entrepreneurship among area professionals. Prior to working at the University, she completed a Master of Library and Information Science degree at Simmons College and a history master’s at the University of Massachusetts. Lori is currently pursuing a doctorate in education at the Warner School.

Angela Clark-Taylor is the Program Manager of the Susan B. Anthony Institute for Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of Rochester. Through her work at the Institute, Angela coordinates local, national, and international conferences, speakers, and events. As an instructor at the College and the Warner School, she teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in Women’s History, LGBTQ Studies, Education, and Leadership. She is currently working on her doctoral degree in educational leadership.

Jump into the world of CSI as you study how to investigate a crime scene and process evidence from a homicide. During the investigation, students will study fingerprints, hairs, fibers, powders, and fur in order to determine the perpetrator of this ultimate whodunit. Throughout this intense week, students will familiarize themselves with the scientific method, microscopes, teamwork, and lab safety. Students will work diligently to find their group’s killer by the end of the week. An interest in science and forensics is recommended.

dennis muceskiInstructor: Dennis Mucenski

Dennis was destined to become a forensics teacher from the first time he watched Law and Order and then CSI. He developed a forensics class at Pittsford Mendon High School and then started co-teaching a forensics course for teachers at College of the Atlantic. He is a published author, does webinars for Ward’s Natural Science, and a three-day conference on how to incorporate forensics into school curricula each July. Dennis also teaches an undergrad and graduate course on the science of crime scene investigation at St. John Fisher College.

 

 

Off-Campus and Abroad Programs

The University of Rochester’s Malawi Seminar, scheduled for June 26–July 9, 2015, is designed for highly motivated high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors. This two-week research methods field school and experiential learning program offers students the unique opportunity to explore, research, and immerse themselves into the daily life of a rural community in the southern African country of Malawi, using ecological anthropology as a framework. The application deadline is February 1, 2015.

joe lanningInstructor: Joe Lanning

As a University of Rochester undergraduate, Joseph Lanning studied abroad in Kenya, Africa. Since completing college, he has committed his life and work to studying livelihoods and development in southern Africa, while partnering with local communities on sustainable development projects focused on improving food security. Following his graduation in 2000, Joe spent two years serving as a Peace Corps volunteer in southern Africa. Joe’s combined experiences in Kenya and Malawi inspired him to create research and experiential learning courses in Malawi, through which he has been bringing undergraduate students to Malawi since 2003. In 2007, he completed his master’s degree in global history, and he is currently completing his PhD in ecological and environmental anthropology at the University of Georgia. Previously, Joe taught ethnographic research methods courses on campus at Rochester and currently teaches Introduction to Anthropology at the University of Georgia. The 2015 Field and Sea Studies sessions will mark his third Samoa program, fourth Malawi program, and his thirteenth year bringing undergraduates to Malawi. In his free time, Joe coaches high school baseball and does documentary photography.

Mike Sweeney Bio PhotoInstructor: Mike P. Sweeney

Mike Sweeney recently retired after 32 years in the classrooms of Portland Public Schools. After completing a master’s degree in anthropology at Duke University in 1976, he embarked on a public school teaching career that was constantly infused with a love of anthropology. In the wake of the Indochina Wars (aka The Vietnam War), waves of refugee children populated his classrooms. Their cultures, H/Mong, Yiu Mien, Lao, Vietnamese, Khmer and Ethnic Chinese, became both tragically real and relevant paradigms for what diversity means in a public school. Twenty years ago with the introduction of an International Baccalaureate Program, Sweeney began teaching social and cultural anthropology at Lincoln High School in Portland. While he taught many other courses in the social sciences and humanities, anthropology became the defining pedagogical passion informing his teaching. Over the years, Sweeney has embarked on study-travel to Vietnam (1988), USSR Khabarovsk (1991), Japan (1993), South Africa (1995), Australia (2003), and Argentina (2005).

The University of Rochester’s Samoa Seminar, scheduled for July 11–24, 2015, is designed for highly motivated high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors. This two-week study abroad/experiential learning program offers students the unique opportunity to experience the cultural the ecological diversity on the island of Samoa through the lens of international development. The program will provide the necessary training for meaningful, productive learning and service work abroad. The application deadline is February 1, 2015.

Brent Vickers Bio PhotoInstructor: Brent Vickers

Brent Vickers is a biologist and environmental anthropologist with more than ten years of experience working on South Pacific islands. Brent first came to the South Pacific for a biological field-research program in French Polynesia while he was an undergraduate student at the University of California, Berkeley. Since then, Brent has worked on several environmental projects on islands including Hawaii, Guam, and the Northern Marianas Islands. Brent is now a PhD candidate at the University of Georgia’s Department of Ecological and Environmental Anthropology and he has spent the last four years researching economic development and climate change in Samoa. Brent is an avid rugby player and coach and is always willing to help students learn about his and many Samoans’ favorite sport.

Joe Bio PhotoInstructor: Joe Lanning

As a University of Rochester undergraduate, Joseph Lanning studied abroad in Kenya, Africa. Since completing college, he has committed his life and work to studying livelihoods and development in southern Africa, while partnering with local communities on sustainable development projects focused on improving food security. Following his graduation in 2000, Joe spent two years serving as a Peace Corps volunteer in southern Africa. Joe’s combined experiences in Kenya and Malawi inspired him to create research and experiential learning courses in Malawi, through which he has been bringing undergraduate students to Malawi since 2003. In 2007, he completed his master’s degree in global history, and he is currently completing his PhD in ecological and environmental anthropology at the University of Georgia. Previously, Joe taught ethnographic research methods courses on campus at Rochester and currently teaches Introduction to Anthropology at the University of Georgia. The 2015 Field and Sea Studies sessions will mark his third Samoa program, fourth Malawi program, and his thirteenth year bringing undergraduates to Malawi. In his free time, Joe coaches high school baseball and does documentary photography.

The University of Rochester’s Chesapeake Bay Immersion Seminar, scheduled for July 26–August 5, 2015, is designed for highly motivated high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors. This two-week research methods field school, onboard a sailing vessel in the Chesapeake Bay, offers students the unique opportunity to explore, research, and immerse themselves into the daily life of the communities in one of America’s great estuaries. Students will explore America’s past and present while learning to sail. The application deadline is February 1, 2015.

Capt. Mike Gosman Bio PhotoInstructor: Captain Michael Gosman

Captain Michael Gosman is a retired Coast Guard Medical Officer who holds a 100 ton Master, Near Coastal, or Steam, Motor, Auxiliary Sail, Commercial Assistance Towing, license. He has circumnavigated the world aboard the polar icebreaker Polar Star, served aboard the Coast Guard tallship Eagle, captained schooners, skipjacks, and numerous small boats. Currently he captains a 46′ and 27′ Research Vessel for Washington College, and operates the privately owned skipjack, Lady Helen, for charter. Raised in Chestertown on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, he has a deep appreciation for the Chesapeake Bay and the environment.

"20140927_Cambridge_Skipjack_Race"Instructor: Mark Weist

Mark is a faculty member in the Department of Anthropology at Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland. During his graduate study at the University of Georgia, Mark studied the way commercial fishermen in the Chesapeake Bay continue to maintain strong communities in the face of ecological change. In addition, Mark is a shipwright that repairs and restores historic wooden vessels and he continues to work closely with commercial fishermen in the region. In addition to serving as the mate on Lady Helen, Mark has worked aboard the Alaskan fishing vessel, Sunlight III, the Puget Sound educational charter vessel, Commencement, and the Chesapeake research vessel, Callinectes. Mark is also a certified Wilderness First Responder and has grown up on the waters of the Chesapeake Bay.

Joe Bio PhotoInstructor: Joe Lanning

As a University of Rochester undergraduate, Joseph Lanning studied abroad in Kenya, Africa. Since completing college, he has committed his life and work to studying livelihoods and development in southern Africa, while partnering with local communities on sustainable development projects focused on improving food security. Following his graduation in 2000, Joe spent two years serving as a Peace Corps volunteer in southern Africa. Joe’s combined experiences in Kenya and Malawi inspired him to create research and experiential learning courses in Malawi, through which he has been bringing undergraduate students to Malawi since 2003. In 2007, he completed his master’s degree in global history, and he is currently completing his PhD in ecological and environmental anthropology at the University of Georgia. Previously, Joe taught ethnographic research methods courses on campus at Rochester and currently teaches Introduction to Anthropology at the University of Georgia. The 2015 Field and Sea Studies sessions will mark his third Samoa program, fourth Malawi program, and his thirteenth year bringing undergraduates to Malawi. In his free time, Joe coaches high school baseball and does documentary photography.