Pre-College Program Listing (PDF)

 

Summer academic programs for high school students

Who do you want to be? Find out at the University of Rochester’s Pre-College programs. The University of Rochester’s innovative Pre-College programs have been enlightening young minds for over 20 years. High school students are able to gain new perspectives on their academic abilities and potential, get a taste of the college environment, enjoy new opportunities to investigate educational goals, and build lasting relationships with peers who share similar academic and personal interests. All courses are designed to broaden the educational experience and sharpen academic skills, helping students learn more about who—not just what—they want to be.

Register or log in to your Pre-College profile today!

 

Online registration is now closed. We are no longer accepting applications for summer 2014. Please be sure to check back in late fall for more information about summer 2015.

 

Rochester Scholars

Rochester Scholars (grades 912)

University of Rochester’s pre-college, academic programs that offer students a chance to experience college life and explore new careers.

  • residential component of this program is available for high school students for one to three weeks over the summer.
  • Programs offer non-credit mini-courses reflective of areas of study available at the University.
  • Students can choose up to two courses per session. Classes meet for 3 hours a day, 5 days a week, with morning sessions from 8:30 am to 11:30 and afternoon sessions from 1 pm to 4 pm.
  • Students interact with peers and get a taste of the college experience in an engaging and challenging setting.
  • Books, supplies, and lunch are included in the price of tuition.
  • Meet with University of Rochester admissions counselors to learn more about applying to college.
  • Students have the opportunity to explore many different career options.

View complete list of Rochester Scholars course descriptions (by subject area).

Eastman Connection

Eastman School of Music and River Campus Summer Connection

This collaborative program allows students to design their own personalized schedules based on their academic interests and musical talents. These noncredit mini-courses are reflective of areas of study available at the University of Rochester and the Eastman School of Music, allowing students to explore different disciplines and experience University life.

The students’ day is split between the River Campus, where they attend a Rochester Scholars course, and the Eastman School for a music course. A shuttle is available for students traveling to the Eastman School, and lunch is provided at a River Campus dining hall. Students interact with peers and get a taste of the college experience in an engaging and challenging setting.

A residential component of this program is available for high school students.

View Eastman Community Music School course listing and descriptions.

2014 Summer Connection options at Eastman Campus include:

  • Eastman Rock Guitar Workshop
  • High School Electronic Music
  • High School Wind Ensemble Workshop
  • Young Performers Chamber Music Program
  • Harp Workshop

For further information on respective programs, please reference the Eastman Community School.

English Immersion

English Immersion Program

This course provides relevant classroom instruction in English language skills, American culture, and history. To complement their immersion program, students also enroll in a Rochester Scholars course in a select academic area of interest to explore, and participate in cultural excursions.

View English Immersion Program course listing and descriptions.

Hajim Program

Hajim Engineering Pre-College Program

Students at the University of Rochester Hajim School of Engineering and Applied Sciences will integrate the unique independence of the Rochester Curriculum with advanced research, invention, and problem-solving skills. Rising 11th–12th graders can explore engineering topics, including one week on biomedical engineering, one week on optics, and one week on audio and music engineering. Students will be able to use the resources of the Hajim School.

This is a three-week, full-day program that runs Monday–Friday, 8:30 am–4:00 pm, with lunch between 11:30–1:00.

The coursework is designed to be fun but rigorous as students complete hands-on activities, team-oriented challenges, and attend lectures given by University professors. The classes will have no more than 20 students.

Some examples of the program’s activities include an egg-drop contest from the balconies of Goergen Hall, learning about basic acoustics, becoming familiar with sophisticated recording studio equipment, and learning about optics and lasers. Students will also take laboratory tours and demos, attend workshops, and participate in Q&A sessions, all of which will expose them to career possibilities in engineering.

The program will allow students to get an exclusive first look at the college experience at Rochester.

*A commuter component is not available for the Hajim Engineering Pre-College Program.

*Enrollment is limited to 20 students; selection for this program is competitive.

View Hajim course listing and descriptions.

Mini Med School

Mini Medical School

Mini Medical School is a unique and intensive three-week residential program is open to juniors and seniors who have an interest in pursuing careers in medicine. This selective and rigorous program offers research labs, rotations, and service learning at local clinics. Students will also be exposed to hands-on medical experience, clinical, didactic, community service, and public health aspects of medicine, providing participants with a real taste of the medical school experience.

Course Outline

Anatomy and Physiology
Introduce students to anatomy through models and human organs (plastinated and embalmed organs).
Topics include: Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology, The Heart, Respiratory System, Muscular System, Nervous System

Neurology/Psychiatry
Designed to give students an understanding of the structure and function of the brain. Students will gain insight into the brain through dissection and prosection, and learn about various psychiatric disorders.
Topics include: Introduction to Neurology and Psychology, Anatomy and Psychology of the Brain

Public Health
Designed to introduce students to public health history, concepts, and contemporary issues. This week will examine Public Health via a tour of Mt. Hope Cemetery, and will include presentations and a poster session.
Topics include: History of Public Health, Public Health Disparities (health and wealth, social justice), Current Issues in Public Health (lead poisoning, tobacco, obesity, clean water/air, health systems/reforms), Global Health Issues (globalization and development, maternal/child health)

Other Activities
Standardized Patient Session, Learning to Take Vital Signs, Suture Session, Taping and Casting, Simulation Exercises (Cardiac, OB/GYN, Intubations, Phlebotomy), ED Rotation, Shadowing a Physician, Wilderness Medicine

Typical Day

TimeActivity
9:00–10:00 am Lecture
10:15–11:30 amLab Time
11:30 am–NoonLab Time
Noon–1:30 pmLunch
1:30–3:00 pmExperiential Sessions
5:00–6:30 pmCommunity Service Sessions (Thursday evenings)

Additional Information

  • A commuter component is not available.
  • Outline and structure are subject to change at the discretion of the professors.
  • An integral aspect of this program is a hands-on medical experience, including models and human organs (plastinated and embalmed specimens). The faculty will demonstrate important structure-function relationships of the body’s major organ systems and give the students an opportunity to handle the organs, learn their important features, and gain an appreciation of the complexity and beauty of human anatomy.
  • Enrollment is limited to 30 students; selection for this program is competitive.

View Mini Medical School course listing and descriptions.

Taste of College

Taste of College (grades 11–12)

For over 20 years, the TOC program has been offering students the opportunity to get a jumpstart on their college careers by taking courses for credit. These programs provides high school juniors and seniors the opportunity to take classes on a part-time basis for intellectual enrichment. These are regularly scheduled undergraduate courses that are offered during the fall, spring, and summer.

  • Taste of College courses are taken alongside our own undergraduate students and offered during the traditional University semesters.
  • residential component of this program is available for high school students for four and six weeks over the summer.
  • Earn college credit, which can be transferred to most colleges and universities.
  • Gain valuable experience before enrolling full-time.
  • Grow confident in your ability to perform at a college level.
  • Clarify the next steps in your educational plans
  • Explore subjects that are not offered in your high school.
  • Study with top-notch faculty and students who are interested in the same topics you are.

Please note: First-time students are only permitted to take one TOC course.

Program Schedule

2014 Classes are offered during the University semesters:

  • Spring: January 15–May 16
  • Summer (1st four week): May 19–June 16
  • Summer (2nd four week): June 30–July 28*
  • Summer (1st six week): May 19–June 27
  • Summer (2nd six week): June 30–August 8*
  • Summer (twelve week): May 19–August 8

* Residential housing is available for the second four-week and six-week Taste of College summer sessions.

View Taste of College course schedules and descriptions.

Tuition and Fees

Learn more about tuition and fees.

Please note: For the fall and spring semesters, 50% of tuition is due at the time of registration. For the summer sessions, 100% tuition is due at the time of registration.

Employees: If you are a University of Rochester employee, your children may be eligible for tuition benefits. Learn more.

Forms and Information Available to Download

Student Application Process

  • Submit the completed TOC application at least 30 days before the start of class.
  • Schedule an interview with the Pre-College Programs office.
  • Allow up to 14 days for the application to be reviewed. Decisions will be sent via mail or email.
  • Admitted students will submit payment in the form of a credit card, check, or tuition waiver.
  • Attend orientation.

TOC Orientation

Newly admitted TOC students must attend an orientation offered by the Pre-College Programs office. During orientation, students will be given a tour of campus, including their classroom location, and be taken to the ID office, parking office, and bookstore. For further information, please note the links below:

Obtaining an ID card: Your ID card will allow you to check books out of the library, attend campus events, etc. Learn more.

Parking Pass: All parking on campus requires a parking pass. Learn more.

Books: Most classes require books. These can be purchased in person at the bookstore or online.

Dropping/Adding Courses

The deadline for dropping a course or adding a new course is the end of the fourth week of classes. All of these changes must be submitted on an official Drop/Add form to the Office of Pre-College Programs. Students must obtain the instructor’s signature for all courses added after the first day of classes. Courses dropped during the first four weeks of classes will be deleted entirely from the official record; however, you will be financially responsible following the refund schedule below.

Any additional tuition for an added course is to be paid at the time the change is made. The deadline for withdrawing from a course is the last day of the eleventh week of the semester. Courses from which non-matriculated students withdraw will appear on the grade report and transcript with a “W” and the week of withdrawal.

Tuition Refund Schedule: If you are dropping or withdrawing from a course, you may only be refunded a portion of the tuition paid. Learn more.

Study Abroad

Summer Study Abroad Programs

Pre-College Programs’ summer study abroad programs to Malawi and Samoa are open to high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors. These programs are challenging and transformative opportunities for students to gain real experiential training and knowledge in field research, anthropological skills, and service learning. Both programs combine academics and adventure, preparing students for the college classroom while reminding them that sometimes the best classrooms are found in unexpected places. Click below to learn more:

Deadline extended to February 28, 2014

Malawi1Overview

 

This is not a typical high school summer program to Africa! This two-and-a-half-week study abroad/experiential learning program offers high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors the unique and transformative opportunity to explore, research, and experience life in the southern African country of Malawi. The seminar challenges classic views of development, helps students build critical thinking skills, and provides a rare opportunity for students to complete university-level field research on a topic of their interest. With its combination of adventure and academics, the seminar prepares students for college while also working to bring sustainable and locally driven change to Malawi.

Participants will be expected to:

  • Keep daily ethnographic observations and interview field notes
  • Attend Chichewa language sessions and complete a language competency exam
  • Perform an ethnographic research study and community survey
  • Participate in daily lectures and excursions with American and Malawian faculty

Program Highlights

  • Training and experience in anthropological research methods
  • Eight-day homestay in a rural Malawian village
  • Courses in Chichewa language
  • Guided tours of Lilongwe city markets
  • Hiking the escarpment of the Great Rift Valley
  • Two-day safari at Liwonde National Park
  • Seminars by local experts on sustainable agriculture, language, economics, culture, history, religion, and public health
  • Community-service work on rural irrigation projects aimed at improving food security

Important Dates and Deadlines

Deadline
Application DeadlineFebruary 21, 2014
Flight Deposit DeadlineMarch 31, 2014
Session DatesJune 30–July 15, 2014*

*Dates are subject to minor changes based on flight availability and cost.

 

Tuition and Fees

Tuition is $3,975, which includes:

  • All in-country travel, meals, lodging, and fees
  • Travel health insurance
  • All lectures and educational activities
  • Chichewa language instruction
  • All museum admission fees
  • A two-night safari to Liwonde National Park

Additional fees (not included in the price of tuition):

  • Airfare from the US to Lilongwe, Malawi (approx. $1,850 to $2,100)
  • Required vaccinations: Hepatitis A, Typhoid (approx. $150 each)
  • Required malaria prophylaxis (approx. $150)
  • Passport
  • Textbook ($15)
  • Personal travel supplies (luggage, flashlights, etc.)
  • Souvenirs

Student Application Process

  • Pre-College Summer Study Abroad Supplement (including short essay responses)
  • Letter of recommendation from a teacher or counselor at your school
  • Current transcript
  • $50 nonrefundable application fee (checks payable to University of Rochester). This fee will be applied to the final tuition bill.
  • Interview (applicant will be contacted via email after materials are submitted)

Samoa Immersion Summer Seminar (grades 1012)

Samoa Immersion

Overview

This is an once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for students to move beyond the postcards and beach resorts and to immerse themselves in Polynesian culture. This two-week study abroad/experiential learning program offers high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors the unique and transformative opportunity to explore, research, and experience life on the island of Samoa. The program will provide the necessary training for meaningful, productive learning and service work abroad. The seminar will focus on the concepts of well-being and development and will explore the many methods used to measure different aspects of well-being and development in a small Samoan village.

Participants will be expected to:

  • Keep daily ethnographic observations and interview field notes
  • Attend Samoan language sessions and complete a language competency exam
  • Perform an ethnographic research study and community survey
  • Participate in daily lectures and excursions with American and Samoan faculty

Program Highlights

  • Training and experience in anthropological research methods
  • Eight-day homestay in a Samoan village
  • Courses in Samoan language
  • Guided tours of Apia city markets
  • Hiking in local tropical rainforests
  • Attend a Fiafia festival
  • Snorkeling in Palolo Deep National Marine Reserve and daily during our homestay
  • Seminars by local experts on agriculture, spirituality, development economics, culture, history, religion, and public health
  • Community-service work on small-scale development projects

Important Dates and Deadlines

Deadline
Application DeadlineFebruary 21, 2014
Flight Deposit DeadlineMarch 31, 2014
Session DatesJuly 18–August 2, 2014*

*Dates are subject to minor changes based on flight availability and cost.

Tuition and Fees

Tuition is $3,975, which includes:

  • All in-country travel, meals, lodging, and fees
  • An eight-day village homestay in Falealupo
  • Travel health insurance
  • All lectures and educational activities
  • Research methods training
  • Samoan language instruction
  • All museum admission fees
  • Excursions to the Palolo Deep National Marine Reserve

Additional fees (not included in the price of tuition):

  • Airfare from the US to Apia, Samoa (approx. $1,850)
  • Required vaccinations: Hepatitis A, Typhoid (approx. $150 each)
  • Passport
  • Textbook ($15)
  • Personal travel supplies (luggage, flashlights, etc.)
  • Souvenirs

Student Application Process

  • Pre-College Summer Study Abroad Supplement (including short essay responses)
  • Letter of recommendation from a teacher or counselor at your school
  • Current transcript
  • $50 nonrefundable application fee (checks payable to the University of Rochester), applied to the final tuition bill
  • Interview (applicant will be contacted via email after materials are submitted)

Short Film

The Art of the Short Film

Today, everyone is a filmmaker. How can we take advantage of all the wonderful recording technologies we have available to us while holding onto some core principles of storytelling? This intensive workshop will attempt to recapture some of the magic, fun, and rigor of the art of movie-making and will introduce you to old (16 mm black and white film stock, 1980s VCR cameras) and new (Vine, iMovie) traditions of short filmmaking. This workshop will plunge you headfirst into an intimate relationship with the art of short visual storytelling.

Topics to be covered include:

  • Principles of narrative, documentary, and experimental filmmaking
  • The materiality of film
  • Basic cinematography, including the framing and lighting of a shot
  • Purchasing and caring for film stock
  • How to load and operate a Bolex camera
  • Film processing, digital transfer, and the lab
  • Cutting/splicing film and projection

Other activities may include:

  • Exercises where we shoot footage of Rochester landmarks, including Mt. Hope Cemetery, the Kodak Building, and High Falls
  • Learning how to best submit films to festivals
  • Seeing how film is manufactured
  • Visiting the world-renowned George Eastman House of Film and Photography, and interacting with their film restoration specialists
  • Class visits by filmmakers