3wk Full Day Programs: Jul 14-Aug 1

Full Day: English Immersion Program

This course provides relevant classroom instruction in English language skills, American culture, and history. To complement their immersion program, students also enroll in a Rochester Scholars course in a select academic area of interest to explore, and participate in cultural excursions.

Full Day: The Art of a Short Film

The workshop takes advantage of all the wonderful recording technologies we have available to us while holding onto some core principles of storytelling. This intensive, full day, three-week workshop will attempt to recapture some of the magic, fun, and rigor of the art of movie-making and plunge you headfirst into an intimate relationship with the art of short visual storytelling.

Full Day: English Immersion Program

This course provides relevant classroom instruction in English language skills, American culture, and history. To complement their immersion program, students also enroll in a Rochester Scholars course in a select academic area of interest to explore, and participate in cultural excursions.

Full Day: The Art of a Short Film

The workshop takes advantage of all the wonderful recording technologies we have available to us while holding onto some core principles of storytelling. This intensive, full day, three-week workshop will attempt to recapture some of the magic, fun, and rigor of the art of movie-making and plunge you headfirst into an intimate relationship with the art of short visual storytelling.

Rochester Scholars A: Jul 14-25

AM: Backstage World: Light, Sound, and Scenery

This course will provide a hands-on introduction to the behind-the-scenes world of theatre. Have you ever wondered about the technology involved in theatre, and how it has evolved over time into today's highly advanced productions? Students will learn not only about theatre's great history, but also about lighting and sound for the theatre environment, and the visual language, principals, safety, and tools used in theatre. Get a first-hand look into the various types of theatres, theatre technicians, techniques, and theories of constructing a stage. Students also get to operate many different types of theatre equipment and explore and research the future of some of the developing technologies available.

AM: Metabolism: In Health and Disease

The course would introduce students to a subsection of general biochemistry: metabolism. Metabolism is defined as the sum total of biochemical reactions occurring in each cell, but it is much more than that. The emergence of metabolism-related disorders is on the rise in the 21st century, and this course will strive to appreciate the foundation of such diseases as obesity and Type II diabetes. Students will gain an understanding of the metabolic underpinnings of these diseases as well as their basic regulation. They will have access to labs working on mouse models of obesity (mice reared on high fat diet) and get hands-on experience in designing experiments and collecting data. They will analyze biochemical parameters such as serum glucose and lipid profile and observe tissue sections under the microscope. The class will end with each student delivering a short report and presentation giving them a flavor of effective scientific communication as an integral part of research. At the end of the class, they will be able to not just appreciate the science behind obesity and Type II diabetes, but they will also adopt a healthy outlook to prevent these diseases with good standards of nutrition and lifestyle choices. It is recommended that students participating have background in biology or chemistry.

AM: May it Please the Court: A Mock Trial

Imagine being a lawyer assigned to your first big case-and it's a homicide! Whether you're a prosecutor or defense attorney, the defendant's fate is, in many ways, in your hands. How will you plan to prove your case? Gather evidence? Prepare witnesses? Convince a jury? What are the specific procedures you'll use in the courtroom? How do real attorneys prepare and argue their cases? In this course, you'll learn about basic criminal trial procedures, but most importantly, through planning, strategizing, and arguing, you'll learn that trial lawyers work in an exciting world. Field trips to Attica State Penitentiary and the Monroe County Court will be included.

AM: Psychology of Conversation

In this course, students will learn about research dealing with successful communication, miscommunication, perspective-taking, behavioral mimicry, and emotional contagion. For example, we will read papers discussing why we yawn when someone else does, cry during sad movies, and how sometimes we just cannot avoid miscommunicating. Though these concepts seem very different, there are cognitive mechanisms that relate each type of communication. The course will involve reading and discussing fun and exciting research papers, as well as in-class and laboratory evaluations of conversation.

AM: What's Up Doc? Exploring Pre-Med Exp.

What's it like to be a physician? What does it take to become a doctor? Meet with practicing physicians, medical students, and other experts. Explore hands - on medical procedures, examine equipment, and discuss medical ethics and the role of the physician. Learn what it takes, academically, to prepare for medical school, and how to decide if medicine is the right path for you. Examine the current pros and cons of being a doctor. Please note, a $25 lab fee applies.

AM: War Room:Strategies of an American Battle Plan

As seen through the eyes of an actual participant, history comes alive in this American military science course. Strategies, battles, twists, turns, surprises, and details not gone over in history class are covered here in detail. Fort Ticonderoga, Saratoga, Bulge, Vietnam, Persian Gulf are just but a few of the battles that may be covered. Earlier conflicts in time may be covered for context. History pivots on battles - come join us in this call to arms!

AM: Francophone Culture and French Language

This course provides opportunities for students to develop basic language skills that can be used in various activities and disciplines. The fundamentals of French pronunciation, grammar, and culture are presented through a balanced development of all four skills: listening, speaking, writing, and culture. Activities and assessments require students to synthesize and interact with the information, thereby honing inquiry and critical-thinking skills while building linguistic and cultural competency. This course is designed for students with little or no knowledge of French language and francophone culture.

AM: Managing and Imagining Your Future

The goal of this course is to provide important academic, social, and self-reflective capital that young adults will need to successfully navigate decisions made in high school and the community in which they live. Resumes, autobiographies, mock interviews, college essays, time management, balancing athletics and academics in college, and much more will be explored through lecture, guest speakers, and tours of businesses/colleges.

AM: Mastering Computer Graphics

This course offers an introduction to computer graphics. It will include lessons on image selection, adding layers, using effects, filters, painting blending, and color modification. Each new technique will build on past ones in order to prepare for the end product: a website of the student's choice. This end product could be used in tandem with other Pre-College courses. For example, if the student is taking Managing and Imagining your Future, they could create an online portfolio including their resume and other materials produced in that course.

AM: Medical Mysteries

This problem-solving course is designed to introduce students to basic content in medical science and pathology which will be used in problem-solving sessions to solve a series of medical cases. We will explore a series of diseases and learn to think through a differential diagnosis. The structure of the course will involve short interactive lectures followed by participation in case studies employing the problem-based-learning process that used in many medical schools.

AM: Video Game Development

Do you like to play video games? Why not learn how to make one? This course is a hands-on lab-based introduction to software engineering and computer programming using the development of computer/video games. Students will learn the basics of computer programming and the basics of the management and development processes of software engineering. This course is intended for students with little or no previous programming experience.

PM: What's Up Doc? Exploring Pre-Med Exp.

What's it like to be a physician? What does it take to become a doctor? Meet with practicing physicians, medical students, and other experts. Explore hands - on medical procedures, examine equipment, and discuss medical ethics and the role of the physician. Learn what it takes, academically, to prepare for medical school, and how to decide if medicine is the right path for you. Examine the current pros and cons of being a doctor. Please note, a $25 lab fee applies.

PM: Nursing: Is it in Your Future?

Nursing is the largest workforce in the health care setting. The roles that nurses full-fill in the hospital, public health , research, and advanced practice roles are vital to the success of a patients health. This course will explore the history of the nursing profession, historical figures in the profession and the impact they have had on health care. We will discuss the foundation of nursing practice, different and diverse nursing specialties, and the future of the nursing in the ever changing health care environment. Come explore if nursing is for you.

PM: The Surprising Side of Psychology

Do babies understand morality? Does the type of music you listen to affect the way your food tastes? Can your mind impact your physical health? This course will cover a variety of subfields of psychology, examining surprising research findings and testing them out for ourselves. We will discuss the psychological theories behind these unexpected results, critically examine current psychological research, and design and run our own psychological study. By the end of the course, students will have a better understanding of how the scientific method is used in psychological research and the kinds of questions researchers investigate across psychology's many diverse fields.

PM: Hands-On History: Telling Stories with Stuff

The stories of our lives increasingly unfold through digital means. It's reasonable to wonder in this day and age: What will become of our stories in the future? How do we navigate through all this information, and will generations to come be able to make sense of it? Hands-on History invites students inside a treasure-laden archive where the material relics of lives from the past are collected for preservation and interpretation. Here, in the department of Rare Books, Special Collections and Preservation at Rochester's Rush Rhees library, we can handle actual fragments of history that connect us to people, places and events like Frederick Douglass' handwritten speeches, Susan B. Anthony's teacup, George Eastman's personal photographs of his African safari and more. Exploring archive contents while learning ways of telling stories with "stuff," we will work together to narrate a chapter of local history by ideating, researching, designing and mounting a public exhibition on display in the University library.

PM: Introduction to Elementary Japanese

This course is for students who are interested in Japanese language through traditional Japanese culture, anime, movies, food and more! Students will learn how to construct Japanese sentences and will be able to talk about themselves and carry on simple conversations with others after step-by-step grammar instruction. Students will have opportunities to do interesting hands-on activities related to Japanese culture. The class will watch Japanese films and/or anime in Japanese every day to develop comprehension of each day's target grammar!

PM: Computer Networking

We live in a world connected by technology. In the famous words of Albert Einstein, "It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has exceeded our humanity." However, whether we agree with Einstein or not, technology is here to stay, and this course will focus on the technology that inter- connects the entire world through the Internet. Students will explore the protocol that allows the Internet to work: TCP/IP. And on a much smaller scale, how information is transmitted across wired and wireless local area networks using the 802.3 and 802.11 standards. They will learn about switches and routers, will be introduced to the Cisco IOS, and will learn how to configure and connect those devices through hands-on exercises and virtual simulation exercises. Upon completion, the student will have a fundamental understanding of computer networking and the protocols that make it all work and have the knowledge to pursue the Cisco CCENT certification.

PM: Scientific Imaging and Cameras

Digital images and video are more important than ever. If you ever wondered how cameras create images and video, what "resolution" actually is, or what's false about "false color" images, this course is for you! Over the course of two weeks, students will have hands-on experience creating images with lenses and other optical systems, recording images with scientific digital cameras and analyzing the images they acquire. Students will also gain experience creating color composite images and have a chance to work with real data from the Hubble Space Telescope to create their own images of famous astronomical objects.

PM: How to Stay in the Game

This course is designed to provide students with a basic knowledge of human anatomy as it applies to the most common sports injuries. Units of study will cover basic anatomy, injuries to the integumentary system, the head, neck, and spine, major joints, and major muscles. Along with the anatomy of the injury, prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation techniques will be discussed. This is a project-based course that will involve research and presentations.

PM: Hand Crafted Photography

In this class, you will learn to create Cyanotype prints and Pinhole Camera prints. All of our tools will be hand made from common materials. After this class, you will be taking home multiple images and a pinhole camera that you constructed.

PM: Come Join the Band

Looking to be in a rock band, create a jazz combo, or sing in your local choir, but don't know how to get started? Learn how to make music creatively by learning new songs in a variety of styles based on material you already know! Further areas covered include song writing and arranging, effective rehearsal techniques, how to put on a performance, understanding the music business, recording with Garage Band, and more. The course culminates in a live performance and/or recording by the groups formed and rehearsed during the week. Open to aspiring/intermediate/advanced instrumentalists and singers, as well as established groups.

Rochester Scholars B: Jul 28-Aug 1

AM: High School Electronic Music (ESM)

This one-week course will provide insight into the diverse world of electronic music with an emphasis on basic audio technology and software. Students will learn to record, edit, and produce CDs of their own performances, which can be used for auditions, scholarship applications, and general promotions. Students will learn about recording technology, editing, sequencing, and mixing audio as well as how to set up a sound system. Students will use audio software including Audacity, Logic Pro, and various plugins and effects, and they will become familiar with a range of audio hardware including MIDI controllers, mixers, microphones, interfaces, and pre-amps. The course will be an introduction to a wide variety of applications in computer music, which will equip students with resources for the successful implementation of music technology in their own careers. No prior knowledge of recording or programming is needed to be successful in this course, though basic computer skills are encouraged. Limited enrollment.

AM: Eastman Rock Guitar Workshop (ESM)

This is a workshop for rock guitarists eager to develop their skill and knowledge of the guitar. Students will work on developing better playing and practice techniques, improving reading and transcription skills, exploring a variety of approaches to improvisation, and gaining a greater familiarity with effects, amps, and other technical aspects of rock guitar gear. Students will focus on the work of classic rock guitarists such as George Harrison, Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, Ritchie Blackmore, Steve Howe, and others. There will also be introductory sessions on jazz, classical, finger-style, and other styles of playing. Students should be at the intermediate level, which means being able to play several songs or excerpts learned from a teacher, YouTube, or tabs. No music reading skills or background in music theory is required. Demonstration/Informal concert for friends and family: Friday, August 1 at 11 a.m. in A707.

AM: Young Performers Chamber Music Program (ESM)

For intermediate and advanced violin, viola, cello, and bass players grades 5-12 (NYSSMA Level V-VI). Daily chamber music coachings for trios, quartets, and quintets as well as daily string orchestra rehearsal. This week will help students develop chamber music skills and deepen knowledge of chamber and string orchestra literature in a nurturing environment, where players can strive for excellence in performing with appropriate support from faculty. Also open to limited collaborations with winds and piano for pre-formed groups. For more information, contact the director at karineviolin@yahoo.com or (585) 314-8716. Concert: Friday, August 1 at 7:30 p.m. in Hatch Recital Hall.

AM: Introduction to Popular Culture in Middle East

This course is designed to introduce students to the different forms of popular culture from the Middle East. We will look at excerpts of theatre productions from the 70s, soap operas and TV shows from the 80s and 90s, and film and literature from the last decade. While keeping historical background and critical reception in mind, our primary objective will be focused on how popular culture can give us insights into a specific society-exposing differences of class, gender, and sexuality, and at the same time influence our perceptions and create lasting stereotypes of people.

AM: The Language of Cinema

For more than one hundred years, movies have shocked audiences, moved them to tears of joy, sorrow, and anger, and transfixed them in philosophical contemplation or simple awe. But why do the movies affect audiences so powerfully? How do they achieve their effects? In this course, we will explore the forms, functions, and history of cinematic grammar. We will watch and discuss several movies, including selections from Rear Window, Rashomon, Citizen Kane, and The Shining. In the process, we will learn why filmmakers use cinematic grammar and we will gain a deeper understanding of and richer appreciation for movies.

AM: Strangeness in Quantum Physics

This course is comprised of a series of mini-lectures and demonstrations about the basic phenomena of quantum physics. The mini-lectures will require only a math background in algebra. Basic quantum mechanics covered will include quantum tunneling, quantum superposition, and two-particle quantum entanglement. The demonstrations will include a series of optics experiments such as the quantum eraser, optical interferometry, generation of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox (aka "spooky action at a distance"), and Bell's inequality.

AM: War Room:Strategies of an American Battle Plan

As seen through the eyes of an actual participant, history comes alive in this American military science course. Strategies, battles, twists, turns, surprises, and details not gone over in history class are covered here in detail. Fort Ticonderoga, Saratoga, Bulge, Vietnam, Persian Gulf are just but a few of the battles that may be covered. Earlier conflicts in time may be covered for context. History pivots on battles - come join us in this call to arms!

AM: Rochester CSI

Jump into the world of CSI as you study how to investigate a crime scene and process evidence from a homicide. During the investigation, you will study fingerprints, hairs, fibers, powders, and fur in order to determine the perpetrator of this ultimate whodunit. Throughout this intense week, you will familiarize yourself with the scientific method, microscopes, teamwork, and lab safety. You will work diligently to find your group's killer by the end of the week. An interest in science and forensics is recommended.

AM: The Infinite Wonders of Space

Do you ever look up at the sky and wonder what makes up all of space and time? This introductory level interactive astronomy class will take you on a journey through space. Students will learn of the major components that make up our universe, such as stars, galaxies, and black holes. You will also participate in fun activities to enhance your understanding of these topics.

AM: Pathogens, Protection, and Pandemics

Every day, there are articles in the news about emerging diseases, potential pandemics, or isolated but dangerous outbreaks. How will these events affect us? How will they impact the world? This course will give a basic overview of infectious diseases from the point of view of the pathogen as well as a look at how the body responds. We will then take that knowledge and try to answer these questions within the context of current topics in infectious diseases, immunity, treatments, and vaccines. This class may be most appropriate for those who have taken biology in high school.

AM: What's Up Doc? Exploring Pre-Med Exp.

What's it like to be a physician? What does it take to become a doctor? Meet with practicing physicians, medical students, and other experts. Explore hands - on medical procedures, examine equipment, and discuss medical ethics and the role of the physician. Learn what it takes, academically, to prepare for medical school, and how to decide if medicine is the right path for you. Examine the current pros and cons of being a doctor. Please note, a $25 lab fee applies.

AM: Biomedical Technology

This course teaches students the underlying physiology of crucial human organ systems and how to record the biological signals which dictate how they perform. Students will learn about vital signs such as blood pressure, heart rate, and electrical signals produced by the muscles and heart. Students will also learn to interpret and integrate these signals with biological processes and diseases.

AM: Introduction to Chemical Engineering

Wonder what it's like to be a chemical engineering student at Rochester, and what career opportunities are available with this degree? Chemical engineering is a multidisciplinary field with challenging careers in industrial processing, pharmaceuticals, materials science, product development (from food to nano-materials) and manufacturing. In this course, students will be introduced to core engineering concepts through short daily lectures on such topics as alternative energy, reaction engineering, fluid dynamics, and transport processes. Demonstrations will augment these concepts along with enriching hands-on laboratory exercises. Given the current world focus on climate change and the ever-growing demand for energy, there will be a strong emphasis on green energy topics. This course is recommended for highly motivated rising juniors and seniors.

AM: Dystopian: Literature and Film

Dystopian literature portrays strange, negative possibilities of a world that could be. This course will explore segments of dystopian novels, including We, 1984, Brave New World, and V for Vendetta, and look at examples from films, such as V for Vendetta. How are governments structured in dystopian societies? How are religions treated? How is censorship enforced or depicted? What caused these societies to evolve in this manner? Beyond our discussion of fiction, we will look at parallels between these works and discuss any similarities in societies of past and present, including the Soviet Union, the United States, and others.

AM: High School Wind Ensemble Workshop (ESM)

This five-day intensive Wind Ensemble Workshop is for students currently in grades 8-12. In addition, college students who reside in the Rochester area and are music majors or minors may enroll in the class without cost to assist and perform with the students. (College students do not need to be there every day of the camp.) The class is offered to Level 5 and 6 NYSSMA soloists on all wind, brass, and percussion instruments. A concert on Friday evening will represent the culmination of the week's exploration of some contemporary and traditional works for wind ensemble or symphonic band. Instrumentation may be limited in certain sections, so early enrollment is encouraged. Concert: Friday, August 1 at 7 p.m. in Kilbourn Hall

AM: IB Extended Essay Workshop

In this Extended Essay Workshop students will explore the criteria for the IB Extended Essay Assignment. Students will develop a focused research question that meets the requirements of IB; a collection of relevant, scholarly articles; and a working structured argument. The research and writing of the extended essay is approximately a 40-hour process; this workshop is the exploratory stage of that process.

AM: Harp Workshop (ESM)

This workshop for beginning and intermediate level harpists (high school to adult) provides individual and ensemble instruction, music theory, and orchestral repertory classes for pedal and lever harpists. Students must bring their own harps. Highlights include concerts and other performance opportunities with Eastman School faculty and guest artists. Concert: Friday, August 1 at noon in Hatch Recital Hall.

AM: Teaching is Universal!

What do Albert Einstein, J.K. Rowling, and President Obama have in common? Teaching! Whether you are considering a career in education or in another field, you will end up teaching others at some point in life. This course is designed both for students considering careers in K-12 or higher education and those seeking practical teaching skills for informal use in the humanities or sciences. Through a variety of hands-on activities, we will explore how people learn, what motivates their learning, and ways to design and deliver engaging, inspirational lessons. The course culminates in a hands-on teaching experience with children in a low-stakes, judgment-free environment.

AM: 3D Modeling and Animation

This class will offer a hands-on introduction to 3D modeling computer graphics and animation, teaching students to construct still images, animations, and 3D printed objects. The coursework follows a sequence of exercises that introduces basic modeling, composition, animation, and 3D printing techniques through demonstration, experimentation, and analysis. Through a series of projects, students will have the opportunity to develop technical graphics skills while enhancing their conceptual understanding of virtual 3D space. Evaluation will primarily be based on the quantity and quality of studio production as well as the effort to thoughtfully contribute to critiques and discussions.

PM: UR Makers: Arduino

In this course, students will explore the world of electronics and microcontrollers using the popular Arduino platform to design and build interactive objects and environments. The course teaches the basics of electronics and programming using a hands-on, "learn by doing" approach. More experienced students can work on more complex projects independently. Each student will receive an Arduino Starter Kit that they can keep after the course.

PM: Making Movie Magic

In this course, students will learn how to use either iMovie or Movie Maker to create personalized movies. These movies can be tied into a digital portfolio to promote the student in a positive and creative light for academic work, college admission, and/or professional advancement.

PM: Careers in Engineering

Through stimulating lectures, interactive labs, and informative field trips, this class introduces the many disciplines of engineering, and what to expect during academic training at a university level. Students will be provided with an overview of the necessary tools for analysis and problem solving, and will be encouraged to use their creativity, energy, and interpersonal skills while participating in several in-class design projects. Additionally, students will learn the importance of mathematics, science, and technology in everyday engineering situations. By the end of the course, they will have a better-defined idea of engineering, its requirements, and their options for a future within this field.

PM: Rochester CSI

Jump into the world of CSI as you study how to investigate a crime scene and process evidence from a homicide. During the investigation, you will study fingerprints, hairs, fibers, powders, and fur in order to determine the perpetrator of this ultimate whodunit. Throughout this intense week, you will familiarize yourself with the scientific method, microscopes, teamwork, and lab safety. You will work diligently to find your group's killer by the end of the week. An interest in science and forensics is recommended.

PM: Astrogeology: Journey Through the Solar System

Have you ever looked at a planet in the night sky and wondered what it might be like to live on it? What would it feel like? Are there mountains, lakes, or riverbeds? Are there places that life could potentially exist? All these questions have answers that will lead to even more questions. This class will take you on a journey through the solar system while covering basic physical and geological principals. Students will leave this class with an understanding of how the Earth and planets form, what each planet is like in terms of composition and surface conditions, and if life has the potential to exist in the solar system.

PM: Eastman Classic Rock Workshop

This intensive workshop is designed for motivated high school rock musicians (grades 9-12) and focuses on rock music of the 1955-1990 period, with emphasis on the classic music of artists including the Beatles, Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, Yes, and many others. Students will participate in rock combos, building performance and aural skills, as well as in rock-specific music theory, history, and improvisation sessions. This workshop is especially well-suited to students who plan to pursue advanced study in music as well as those aspiring to a career in popular music. Open to guitarists, bassists, drummers, keyboardists, and vocalists at intermediate level or above.

PM: What's Up Doc? Exploring Pre-Med Exp.

What's it like to be a physician? What does it take to become a doctor? Meet with practicing physicians, medical students, and other experts. Explore hands - on medical procedures, examine equipment, and discuss medical ethics and the role of the physician. Learn what it takes, academically, to prepare for medical school, and how to decide if medicine is the right path for you. Examine the current pros and cons of being a doctor. Please note, a $25 lab fee applies.

PM: Shakespeare in Performance

Shakespeare is not sacred. His work is meant to be seen, tasted, spoken, and tossed about. In this course, we will look at Shakespeare in performance. Initially, that will mean looking at scenes from a number of different takes on Shakespeare's plays, including direct adaptations such as Kenneth Branagh's Henry V, as well as looser adaptations, such as Ran, She's the Man, and 10 Things I Hate About You. The goal of the class is to stop thinking about "Shakespeare's" characters. We will discuss DiCaprio's Romeo, McKellen's Richard III, and Ethan Hawke's Hamlet. Each performer does something new and unique with every role. By the end of the course, students will be claiming their own Shakespearean characters, and delivering their version of one of that character's speeches.

PM: The Magic of Molars and the Wisdom of Teeth

What is it like to be a dentist, or a dental specialist such as an orthodontist, pediatric dentist, prosthodontist, periodontist, or oral surgeon? This course will explore hands-on dental procedures, examine the latest equipment, and take a close look at the skills and educational requirements necessary to become an oral health professional. Students will learn firsthand how to conduct an oral examination and to make diagnostic plaster models of teeth for use in treatment planning. Students will meet with dentists who are pursuing careers as faculty in educational programs and with researchers working in the basic sciences or translational arenas. Dental specialists working in diverse and emerging areas of treatment, including dental implants and cosmetic dentistry, will interact with the students. There will be site visits taken to the ambulatory care dental unit and the Center for Oral Biology at the University's Medical Center. The course will focus on the changing field of oral health and the high demands for dentists to meet the oral health care needs of local, national, and international patient populations.

PM: Unclogging the Heart

This course will give students an overview of the physiology of the heart and will cover the molecular and cellular events that lead to heart failure. The course will specifically focus on one key cell type that is involved in cardiac plaque formation, the platelet. We will investigate how the moleclular properities of platelets are involved in driving cardiac plaque formation.

PM: Would You Press the Button?

In this course we will discuss famous moral dilemmas from contemporary life, politics, philosophy, and movies, and try to solve them. Should President Truman have authorized dropping the bomb on Japan? Should you push an innocent person in front of a train if it would save other lives? Should the passengers on the ferry in the film The Dark Knight have pressed the button, destroying a ship of convicts to save themselves from the Joker? Students will discuss and debate questions like these on teams in a Bowl-style format, make short group presentations, and play card games that illustrate answers to tough questions about justice.

PM: An Introduction to Postmodern Art

In the aftermath of World War II, the international world of art began its gradual shift toward Postmodernism. The idea of "artistic genius" crumbled, as did conventional ideas of "high" and "low" art. From minimalism and conceptual art to performance art and multimedia works, the possibilities have been endless. In this course, we will explore a wide range of postmodern works, and attempt to create some of our own through hands-on exercises, taking inspiration from Gordon Matta-Clark's "Tree Dance," Shelley Jackson's "Skin Project," and many others. Students will come to understand postmodernism's many currents of influence and departure, and achieve the type of visual literacy needed to discuss works of art from any period.

PM: Cochlea: Microphone of the Inner Ear

Numerous groundbreaking inventions are inspired by the close observation of biological systems. We explore an example in bioengineering: the cochlea, our hearing organ. The cochlea is a biological microphone. It encodes acoustic vibrations into neural (electrical) signals. This class will teach the basic concepts of the acoustics, vibrations, the inner ear mechanics and physiology, and the working theory of the microphones. By learning the working principles of the cochlea and the microphone, students will understand the similarity and the difference between the cochlea and the microphone. The course will be comprised of lectures, hands-on experiments, and field trips to bioengineering laboratories. Students will assemble their own microphones and test their performances.

PM: Identity and Popular Culture

Popular culture is becoming increasingly central to global social life. Through music, art, fashion, film, and the World Wide Web, popular culture shapes how we think about and view each other, the world around us, and ourselves. In this class, we will examine how popular culture affects our lives as well as what popular media and culture tell us about who we are, individually and collectively. This course looks at how identity is visualized across six media categories: music, film, graphic novels and comics, fashion, literature, and contemporary visual art. Students will learn how to analyze different forms of popular culture from a visual perspective, 'reading' film scenes, song lyrics, music videos, fashion designs, advertisements, and other forms of popular culture much like a text. Activities include discussion, peer-group work, and art projects.

Taste of College

Taste of College

Taste of College



2014 Course Listing and Descriptions: