Below is a list of the academic programs available to undergraduates. Some students have even created their own majors.

ARTS, SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING

African & African-American Studies
BA, minor

The Frederick Douglass Institute for African and African-American Studies (AAS) has developed an interdisciplinary major, which focuses primarily on the social sciences and humanities. A broad range of undergraduate courses in AAS is offered in collaboration with several Rochester departments, including anthropology, art and art history, economics, English, history, modern languages and cultures, music, political science, and religion and classics. AAS offers an undergraduate internship, a distinguished speakers series, a bi-weekly video and film series, and a work-in-progress seminar series to graduates and faculty members who have the opportunity to present and discuss their research. It’s common for AAS majors to complement their program with a second major or study abroad.

American Sign Language
BA, minor

The American Sign Language (ASL) Program offers a BA degree that provides practical preparation for a variety of professions related to deafness, such as deaf educators, sign language interpreters, audiologists, speech pathologists, researchers, counselors, government specialists, program administrators, and community service personnel. The program offers classes in ASL as a language, in the literature and culture of the American Deaf community, in the linguistics and psycholinguistics of signed and spoken languages, and in teaching ASL as a second language. It even offers instruction in Japanese sign language. Because the City of Rochester has a large deaf population, Rochester students have many opportunities to learn and use ASL outside the classroom, including theatrical events and lectures in ASL. The program is affiliated with the University’s Sign Language Research Center, Center for Language Sciences, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, and Department of Linguistics, where faculty, students, and visiting scholars pursue interdisciplinary research about ASL and other sign languages of the world.

American Studies
BA, minor

American studies (AMS) is an interdisciplinary major that examines American history, culture, and social life. AMS students explore such topics as the arts in American society; race, class, gender, ethnicity, and religion as aspects of American identity; and ideas and institutions that shape the United States. As AMS students develop an area of focus, they learn from faculty in many academic departments, including anthropology, art and art history, English, film and media studies, history, music, philosophy, political science, and religion and classics. The AMS major requires ten courses and culminates with a capstone research paper. American studies graduates are prepared for careers or further studies in law, social service, teaching, art, business, and any endeavor that demands clear, cogent thinking and writing.

Anthropology
BA, minor

The Department of Anthropology prepares students to conceive, design, and carry out research projects, and to collect new data through surveys, interviews, and observation. Students will analyze and summarize existing data and make coherent oral presentations, and will have a cross-cultural perspective on the assumptions that exist within cultures, opening the way to innovative solutions. Introductory courses are small, emphasizing discussion and student participation. Many anthropology courses have a hands-on research component, and some undergraduates receive research grants through the department. Anthropology faculty members have conducted field research in Latin America, Asia, Oceania, and the Middle East. Students may get involved in Seeds for College, which helps inner-city children graduate from high school and awards them seed money for college. Other students traverse the globe for the Malawi Immersion Summer Seminar, a three-week anthropological program in Africa. The list of careers anthropology alumni have had is diverse, from cardiac surgeon to childcare counselor; legal advisor to livestock buyer; pediatrician to park ranger.

Medical Anthropology
Minor

The medical anthropology minor requires six courses.

Archaeology, Technology, & Historical Structures 
BAminor

Rochester’s BA program in archaeology, technology, and historical structures (ATHS) is further evidence of the University’s willingness to try something different and exciting. This multidisciplinary program integrates material from engineering, natural sciences, humanities, and social sciences. A prominent feature of the program is undergraduate research under the aegis of both the University and prestigious foreign academic institutions to address issues of interpretation, conservation, and restoration of the world’s cultural heritage. Through a series of tracks, specialized cores, and elective courses, ATHS students tailor the program to their specific interests while preparing for graduate studies in archaeology, architecture, civil or mechanical engineering, and art history, classics, or history. One of the many highlights of the ATHS program is the opportunities for study on location or study abroad.

Art History
BA, minor

The art history major is ideal for a student who wishes to acquire a general cultural background, develop analytical and writing skills, and sharpen critical sensibilities. Through this BA program, the Department of Art and Art History involves students in studying the history of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other art forms from antiquity to the present. With the aid of their advisor and a faculty sponsor, students choose one of three concentrations based on individual interests and plans: studio theory and practice; history and theories of art; and visual and cultural studies. One of the department’s distinctive features is the Art New York program, which offers students the chance to work and study in New York City and understand how art is produced, collected, curated, written about, and presented. The University’s Hartnett Gallery provides similar opportunities, as do local internships with the Memorial Art Gallery, George Eastman House, Landmark Society, and several area museums. Experiences like these prepared alumni for careers in museums, universities, historic preservation, city planning, commercial art galleries, art and architecture libraries, and architectural firms.

The Undergraduate Program in Biology and Medicine (UPBM) combines the strengths of the College of Arts, Sciences, and Engineering and the School of Medicine and Dentistry, just across the street. Undergraduate students benefit from a mix of laboratory work, lectures, specialty seminars, and research opportunities. A large percentage of UPBM majors participate in research opportunities, working side-by-side with their professors. Depending on the circumstances, research can be done on a paid, credit-bearing, or voluntary basis. Many UPBM majors go on to medical school and careers in the health professions, but others pursue research, teaching, military careers, and the Peace Corps.

Biochemistry
BS

Biochemistry is the study of chemical processes relating to living organisms. The biochemistry major requires 21 courses and 1.5 labs.

Biology 
BAminor

The BA in biology differs from the BS tracks in that it is more general in its subject matter and requires fewer courses/credits, thus offering greater flexibility in total programming. Students who have a definite interest in one area of the biological sciences choose one of the BS tracks that the Department of Biology offers. The biology major requires 18 courses and 1.5 labs. The biology minor requires six courses.

Cell & Developmental Biology
BS

Cell and developmental biology studies the properties of cells and the process by which organisms grow and develop. The cell and developmental biology major requires 20 courses and 1.5 labs.

Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
BS

Ecology is the study of the relationship between living organisms and their environments. Evolutionary biology is the study of the process that creates the diversity of life on Earth. The ecology and evolutionary biology major requires 22–23 courses.

Microbiology
BS

Microbiology is the study of microscopic organisms. The microbiology major requires 20 courses and 2–3 labs.

Molecular Genetics
BS

Molecular genetics is the study of the structure and function of genes at a molecular level. The molecular genetics major requires 20 majors and 1.5 labs.

Neuroscience
BS

Neuroscience is the study of the nervous system. The major in neuroscience is offered through the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, yet is also associated with the Department of Biology. The neuroscience major requires 20 courses.

Brain & Cognitive Sciences
BA, BS, minor

The Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences (BCS) offers undergraduates the opportunity to study the nature and products of mental activity: perception, action, thinking, language, learning, and memory. This new natural science discipline combines cognitive psychology, computer science, and neuroscience, bringing these fields together to understand the activities of the mind and brain. The faculty members are heavily invested in research and encourage qualified undergraduates to engage in research projects. Research opportunities are available with faculty both within the department and in associated departments and programs, such as linguistics, computer science, philosophy, music theory, and neurobiology and anatomy. There is a long list of career paths for BCS graduates that includes academic research and testing, education, hi-tech, language, biotech, healthcare, and government.

Neuroscience
BS

The program in neuroscience (BS in biological sciences: neuroscience) provides students interested in biology an opportunity to explore the molecular, cellular, and physiological bases of behavior. Administered by the Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, the Neuroscience concentration is one of several tracks associated with the Undergraduate Program in Biology and Medicine. It includes rigorous preparation in math, physics, chemistry, and biology, accompanied by core and upper-level courses in neuroscience offered by faculty in the Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences. The neuroscience major requires 20 courses.

Business 
BA, BSminor

The business major is a multidisciplinary program combining the strengths of the Department of Economics and the acclaimed Simon School of Business. Like most business programs, it offers a challenging core sequence in finance, accounting, marketing, operations, and organizations, building on principles of statistics, economics, and other social sciences. Unlike other undergraduate business programs, though, this major demands that you learn and demonstrate extraordinary quantitative and analytical skills that challenge MBA students elsewhere. You will choose from two tracks: one is in organizations and markets, and the other is in marketing. Like all Rochester students, you’ll enjoy the flexibility of the Rochester Curriculum, including the freedom to double major or pursue a self-designed program. In the end, you’ll have a legitimate, strong liberal arts degree and the confidence to take that next step into the business world or onto graduate studies.

The BS offers tracks in Business Finance/Accounting, General Management, and Marketing.

Economics 
BAminor

The Department of Economics is known worldwide as one of the leading centers of economic research and training. This tradition continues today with faculty committed to providing education of the highest quality. Each faculty member is a distinguished scholar in his or her field. Ranked among the top economics departments in the nation, it offers two undergraduate majors as well as an honors degree for students seeking additional rigor. Economics majors can supplement their studies with an internship or certificate program, by becoming a teaching assistant, or by studying abroad. Economics graduates are prepared for positions in business and government, for professional schools of business administration, including the 3-2 MBA program with Rochester’s Simon Business School, for graduate work in economics or public policy, law school, and PhD programs in economics.

The economics major requires eleven courses, and the economics minor requires five courses.

Financial Economics 
BA

The financial economics major requires thirteen courses.

Brazilian Portuguese 
Minor*

* Pending final approval.

Chemistry
BA, BS, minor

The Department of Chemistry faculty members are well known nationally and internationally for their research and publications. They have garnered many prestigious awards, including the National Medal of Science, the highest honor a scientist can hope to achieve. Since many professors are involved in research in organic, inorganic, and physical chemistry, undergraduates also have the opportunity to engage in cutting-edge research funded by such agencies as the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Energy. The chemistry department also engages in many interdisciplinary projects that include Rochester’s medical school faculty. In addition to doing research, some chemistry majors develop skills as workshop leaders in the peer-led workshop program created and established by Rochester’s chemistry department. Similar programs are now used nation-wide in many subjects. Approximately half of chemistry graduates continue to advanced study in chemistry or other graduate and professional programs (e.g., forensic science, pharmacy, dental, or medical school). Others start employment either in industry or through a research institution.

Chinese
Minor

The Chinese minor is fundamental for those who embrace a career in the social sciences, especially in economics, education, history, and internal relations. The minor covers areas such as Chinese language, culture, literature, film, art, history, and politics. The Chinese minor requires six courses.

Comparative Literature
BA, minor

Comparative Literature is the interdisciplinary study of literature and culture from different perspectives and from different national groups. Students do work in comparative literature either with language-intensive courses, or with courses only in English. Students construct their majors with concentrations on the literature and culture of two national areas, or they do one area in the original language and one in English. The comparative literature major requires eleven courses, and the comparative literature minor requires five courses.

Creative Writing 
BA*, minor, concentration

The Department of English offers a major in creative writing for students who want to explore the art of writing and refine their skills in critical reading. Students work intensively on their own imaginative writing (fiction, poetry, and play writing) in conjunction with the study of literature. Students wishing to pursue an English major in creative writing must apply to the Creative Writing Advisor in the department and receive written approval.
The creative writing major requires a minimum of ten courses.

* Pending final approval.

Dance
Minor

The dance minor will develop skills in observation, analysis, and critical response to dance as an art form and as a component of life and culture. A minor in dance will help foster educated audiences and participants in the diverse field of dance in culture. The dance minor requires a minimum of 26 credits.

Movement Studies
Minor

The movement studies minor emphasizes contemplative practice, the nature of community, diversity, and an appreciation of diverse and creative ways of thinking and moving. The dances and movement practices of any given culture also shed light on the sociology, philosophy, politics, and relationships among people in that culture. The movement studies minor requires a minimum of 26 credits.

Digital Media Studies
BA

The new digital media studies (DMS) major provides students with the critical thinking and writing skills to become active producers of digital media. This BA program requires nearly equal measures of theoretical and historical work on one hand, and scientific and technological work on the other. The technology required to create digital media has become more pervasive, but the number of people with rigorous training in either the production or analysis of digital media has not risen correspondingly. This major—designed by faculty from nine disciplines in the arts, sciences, and engineering—is intended to remedy that situation. DMS students choose courses from a long, eclectic list, culminating with a team-oriented capstone project, beginning in the junior year. Graduates are prepared for careers traditionally associated with a liberal education (e.g., law, teaching, business, public service), as well as those more directly associated with media analysis and production, like careers in the entertainment industry and communications. The new Ronald Rettner Hall for Media Arts and Innovation provides DMS students a place to gain both practical skills and a theoretical understanding of digital technology.

Known for its strength in tectonics, climate science, geochemistry, and geophysics, the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) is a broad department that also stands out for its research, funding, publication record, and award-winning professors. Most EES students do an independent study or senior research project with faculty, and many get experience in laboratory settings or through fieldwork. Graduates of the department are often employed in geologic or environmental consulting, while others are hired as earth scientists by state or federal agencies. Those who pursue graduate study frequently take jobs in the oil industry. Two EES undergraduate alumni completed their PhDs elsewhere before collaborating on an international ocean drilling project. Today, they both have tenure-track faculty positions at highly regarded universities.

Environmental Geology
Minor

The environmental geology minor is intended especially for natural science and social science concentrators who are planning on further study or employment in environmental fields. The environmental geology minor requires six courses.

Environmental Sciences
BS

Environmental science is one of several majors offered through the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES). The BS program is designed to give students the background for graduate work and professional careers in the earth and environmental sciences, and in those areas in which the earth sciences overlap with the life sciences or with engineering.

Environmental Studies
BA

Environmental studies is one of several majors offered through the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES). The BA program is designed to allow more flexibility in program design and is pursued not only by students preparing for graduate work in the earth sciences but also by students interested in law, management, or teaching.

Geological Sciences
BA, BS, minor

Geology is one of several majors offered through the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES).

Geomechanics
BS

The Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences and the Department of Mechanical Engineering jointly offer the BS in geomechanics. The program provides an unusual opportunity for students interested in the quantitative aspects of the earth sciences. The curriculum emphasizes applying the principles of mechanics to problems associated with the atmosphere, oceans, and earth. Geomechanics is a natural blend between the departments and builds on several areas common to engineering and to quantitative earth sciences: the mechanics of fluids, the mechanics of solids, and the properties of materials. Students who successfully complete this program become well equipped for employment or graduate studies in a number of fields, such as civil engineering and other engineering disciplines, geology and geophysics, hydrology, and engineering geoslogy. Career opportunities include work with the US Geological Survey and with departments of natural resources or environmental protection at the federal, state, and county levels. Students could also work with the oil and mineral resources industries and in multidisciplinary private consulting firms engaged in geological engineering.

East Asian Studies
BA, minor

As part of the strategic plan to increase Rochester’s international focus, the University recently added a BA and minor in East Asian studies. East Asian studies faculty teach students how to examine East Asia’s growing power through a variety of academic lenses such as anthropology, economics, and history. The faculty engages students using a variety of tools, including literature, documentary and feature films, and video games.

Audio & Music Engineering 
BS*

The new major in audio and music engineering (AME) is a multidisciplinary program combining engineering and applied science with music and the audio arts. All AME students develop the technical skills and artistic sensibilities to become creative pioneers in audio through either a BA or BS degree option. Experiential learning, hands-on design, and the creative process are at the core of both AME degrees, and each student’s program culminates with a project portfolio that demonstrates skills and creative talents in acoustics, audio software design, electronics, recording arts, and signal processing. AME graduates will be prepared for careers in audio and music technology with thousands of companies in diverse industries: computer, software, and internet; audio software; music and audio content production; core audio technologies and components; musical instrument and audio equipment manufacturers; video gaming; research and development institutions; and other related industries.

* This program is seeking ABET accreditation. Meanwhile, graduates are not eligible to receive maximum professional education/experience credits toward NY State licensure.

Biomedical Engineering 
BSminor

The Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME) offers an ABET accredited BS degree and takes pride in providing meaningful undergraduate research opportunities. Research specialties include biomechanics, biomedical acoustics, cell and tissue engineering, medical imaging, nanotechnology, neuroengineering, and optics. Through employment, independent studies, or formal research programs, nearly 75 percent of the BME undergraduates report research experience outside the classroom. The BME curriculum emphasizes engineering and design principles taught in the context of current problems in medicine and biology. Students complete a four-course concentration in one of four BME specialties, and the major culminates with a senior design course. In keeping with Rochester’s entrepreneurial spirit, many BME students succeed in an annual business plan competition to consider further development of their designs. Other opportunities include Rochester’s five-year BS/MS program, internships, the Industry Practicum, and membership in the Biomedical Engineering Society. For students considering medical school, all courses usually required for admission to MD programs are readily accommodated within the BME requirements.

Chemical Engineering 
BSminor

The Department of Chemical Engineering is best known for its strengths in clean energy, biotechnology, and nanotechnology. In the National Research Council’s 2011 survey, Rochester’s program was ranked 13th in the country. That same year, Professor Ching Tang was awarded the Wolf Prize in Chemistry, an internationally recognized honor of great distinction. Many chemical engineering majors participate in undergraduate research and paid work experience, such as the Eisenberg Summer Internship program. Nearly two-thirds will go onto master’s and PhD programs, while others are hired as chemical engineers or process engineers.

Computer Science 
BABSminor

The Department of Computer Science (CSC) stands out for more than its reputation in academics and research. It’s also unusually friendly and collaborative, and there’s a strong bond among CSC majors. Academically, CSC has many specializations for students, including computer systems, computer theory, human computer interaction, natural language processing, machine learning (Big Data), machine vision, and robotics. Our faculty is nationally recognized by its peers and by funding agencies; they win best-paper awards at conferences, write textbooks used at hundreds of colleges, and advise undergraduates in independent research. More than half of the CSC students have a second major or a minor. Thirty to forty percent get involved in undergraduate research, and many are recruited for internships with Google, Microsoft, Amazon, Facebook, and Apple. And, while many graduates head to graduate school, take jobs in industry, or start their own businesses, CSC alumni include lawyers, doctors, teachers, and even a rabbi.

Electrical & Computer Engineering 
BSminor

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) is committed to providing students with the knowledge and skills that enable them to build productive careers in the field. The Department is home to high-quality, ABET-accredited programs that focus on close interactions between students and faculty. ECE has twenty full-time faculty members who teach and perform research in many areas, such as signals and communications, VLSI and computer architecture, and physical electronics. The department provides leadership for University-level initiatives ranging from nanotechnology and energy research to audio and music engineering, and continues to play a prominent role in the Energy Research Initiative, the Center for Emerging & Innovative Sciences, the Music Research Lab, and the Rochester Center for Biomedical Ultrasound. Each year, many ECE undergraduates conduct research with faculty, and some pursue Rochester’s combined BS-MS program. Internships and the industry practicum program provide additional opportunities for professional, hands-on learning.

Engineering & Applied Sciences 
BS

The Hajim School of Engineering and Applied Sciences understands that some students want to pursue degrees in engineering, but find a typical BS program may be too specific for their needs. Those who are interested in architecture, for example, may want to design their own plan of study within certain guidelines. For this reason, they should consider the interdepartmental engineering (BS IDE) degree. This degree program requires that students complete three sequences of technical courses of their own choosing. Additionally, students completing a BS IDE degree must complete an independent study project that culminates in a written senior thesis. The Interdepartmental Programs in Engineering Committee reviews each program proposal, which, if approved, becomes that student’s degree requirements. The engineering and applied sciences major requires thirty-two courses.

Engineering Science 
BA

At Rochester, the Hajim School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (HSEAS) recognizes that not everyone who studies engineering wants to be a licensed engineer. The BA in engineering science (ES) is designed for students who recognize the importance of science and technology in today’s world and want to better understand the engineer’s role. By combining core courses in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and computer science with a series of core engineering courses, ES students have the foundation for careers as patent attorneys, technical writers, science advisors, technical salespeople, and educators. The ES curriculum also includes science and engineering electives, two “clusters” in humanities and social sciences, and some writing courses. As is typical of the University of Rochester, the Engineering Science program offers considerable flexibility, permitting students to develop a plan of study that meets their individual educational goals. The engineering science major requires thirty-two courses.

Environmental Engineering 
Minor

The environmental engineering minor requires four courses. Students are expected to have at least one semester of chemistry, two semesters of calculus, and one semester of physics as prerequisites.

Mechanical Engineering 
BSminor

The Department of Mechanical Engineering is well known for its Fusion Science Center and the study of alternative energy through inertial confinement or magnetic fusion. Other strengths include opto-mechanics and design, optical manufacturing, and materials science. The faculty is prolific in its research and in getting published, and several members have won awards for excellence in teaching. Faculty advises all undergraduates, and many students take advantage of undergraduate research opportunities, internships, and hands-on projects, such as Mini-Baja and the Solar Splash. Approximately one-third will go on to master’s and PhD programs; others are hired by such companies as ITT Exelis, OptiPRO, Optimax, and GM.

Optical Engineering 
BS

We are proud to be home to the first and oldest optics program in the country. Part of the Hajim School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, the Institute of Optics is best known for its focus on the quantum theory of optics. It prepares students for careers in specialized fields such as nanotechnology; optical coatings; optical systems, testing, and design; and sales. Many of our graduates are scooped up by companies with defense contracts; others go to law school and become patent attorneys. In fact, graduates of the Institute of Optics get more job offers than our students can fill. About 75% of the optics students at Rochester participate in undergraduate research, where they work side-by-side with professors who, according to Google Scholar, have written three of the 12 most cited books in physics.

Students normally apply for admission to the Institute of Optics at the end of the sophomore year by submitting a signed concentration approval form to the Undergraduate Program Coordinator. The optical engineering major requires 130 credit hours.

Optics 
BSminor

We are proud to be home to the first and oldest optics program in the country. Part of the Hajim School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, the Institute of Optics is best known for its focus on the quantum theory of optics. It prepares students for careers in specialized fields such as nanotechnology; optical coatings; optical systems, testing, and design; and sales. Many of our graduates are scooped up by companies with defense contracts; others go to law school and become patent attorneys. In fact, graduates of the Institute of Optics get more job offers than our students can fill. About 75% of the optics students at Rochester participate in undergraduate research, where they work side-by-side with professors who, according to Google Scholar, have written three of the 12 most cited books in physics.

Students normally apply for admission to the Institute of Optics at the end of the sophomore year by submitting a signed concentration approval form to the Undergraduate Program Coordinator. The optics major requires 130 credit hours. The optics minor requires five courses.

English Language, Media, & Communication 
BA*, minor, concentration

The English language, media, and communication major requires ten courses. It allows students to build their major around the English department’s multi-faceted offerings in areas such as rhetoric, media studies, film, language studies, nonfiction writing, journalism, and public speaking. This track may be of special interest to students who are contemplating careers in such areas as law, nonfiction writing, publishing, print journalism, or electronic journalism (though its emphasis is critical, theoretical, and historical as much as practical).

* Pending final approval.

English Literature
BA*, minor, concentration

This major offers undergraduates the chance to explore a wide array of literary works, such as poetry, drama, fiction, and non-fiction. It has richly varied offerings in creative writing, film and media studies, journalism, rhetoric, and theatre. The department offers independent research and internships, and maintains close connections with other undergraduate programs in comparative literature, film and media studies, women’s studies, African and African-American studies, theatre, and literary translation studies. Students pursuing the English honors program write an extended thesis in their senior year. English majors often get involved in campus theatrical productions, the Campus Times newspaper, the undergraduate literary magazine (Logos), the Plutzik Reading Series, and the Undergraduate English Council. After graduation, some English majors pursue advanced degrees in literature, law, business, creative writing, or medicine. Others make careers in journalism, publishing, or teaching.

* Pending final approval.

Film & Media Studies
BA, minor

The Film and Media Studies (FMS) Program is truly interdisciplinary, incorporating faculty from the departments of anthropology, art and art history, English, linguistics, modern languages and cultures, political science, and the Eastman School of Music. FMS students choose from two major tracks: film studies or the production-oriented track in media studies. FMS is well known is such areas as feminist film theory, Japanese, French, Spanish, and Eastern European cinemas, and language in advertising. Also, television studies is emerging as a substantial area of study. Most FMS classes have only 10 to 30 students, and no teaching assistants teach any of the classes. The FMS faculty members are active researchers and very dynamic teachers who attract students from across disciplines. Many FMS students complete internships, including the popular Art NY program in New York City. It’s common for at least one FMS major to stay for a tuition-free fifth year through either Rochester’s Take Five or KEY program. In fact, for the 2013-2014 academic year, two FMS students will pursue media-related KEY projects. Graduates may head to law or graduate school, teach, or work in media industries, such as film, television, advertising, or publishing.

French
BA, minor

The French major is an excellent option for students interested in art history, European studies, history, international relations, literature, music, philosophy, political science, and psychology. French majors and minors attend small classes and meet with faculty on a regular basis. French majors have gone on to dental school, medical school, law school, advanced degrees in education, and graduate school in humanities and sciences. The French major requires twelve courses, and the French minor requires five courses.

German
BA, minor

The German major is an excellent option for students interested in art history, economics, European studies, history, international relations, literature, music, philosophy, political science, and psychology. A major in German provides students with the necessary skills to pursue any number of career options that stress critical thinking and cultural communication. German majors have gone on to medical school, law school, international business, and graduate programs in German studies, film, and history. The German major requires eleven courses, and the German minor requires five courses.

History
BA, minor

The Department of History is well known for its strength in cultural and intellectual history, slavery and the transatlantic slave trade, and Atlantic and comparative oceanic studies. The professors are an internationally acclaimed, award-winning group who actively research, publish, and take the art of teaching seriously. They’re also accessible; in addition to regular advising, many work closely with history majors undertaking senior theses, independent study readings or research courses, and public history internships. The department recently partnered with Rochester’s Rare Books and Special Collections to offer training in documentary editing. In the past ten years, 38 students completed public history internships in Rochester-area museums, archives, and institutions, including the Strong Museum, Rochester Museum and Science Center, Susan B. Anthony Museum, Landmark Society, NY State Division of Human Rights, Legal Aid Society, and the George Eastman House. Many history graduates proceed to law school or other graduate-level studies. Others work in documentary filmmaking, teach at secondary schools, or work in museums.

Interdepartmental Studies
BA, minor

The Rochester Curriculum is famous for its freedom, and most Rochester students will say the flexibility of the curriculum was one of the key reasons they chose to attend. One of the freedoms Rochester students enjoy is the ability to design their own major representing at least two—and often more—academic areas. The important characteristic of an interdepartmental studies major is the exploration of an intellectually challenging theme examined through the lens of several disciplines. Most self-designed majors consist of ten courses (40 credits) from at least two departments, and up to four supplementary courses. Here is a small sample of previous interdepartmental studies majors: artistic and mathematical space; ethnomusicology; global studies in sustainability; international social entrepreneurship; Islam and the modern world; stage and screen culture; and urban youth studies. Students planning to pursue this option work with advisors in the Center for Study Abroad and Interdepartmental Programs.

Italian
Minor

The Italian minor is fundamental for those who embrace a career in the humanities and the social sciences, especially in art history, literature, history, music, linguistics, education, and international relations. It is also becoming increasingly useful for those who plan a career in various technological fields, in business administration and in many other professional fields. The Italian minor requires five courses.

Japanese
BA, minor

The Japanese major is an excellent option for students interested in art history, Asian studies, film studies, history, international relations, literature, philosophy, political science, psychology, and religion. A major in Japanese provides students with the necessary skills to pursue any number of career options that stress critical thinking and cultural communication. Japanese majors have gone on to medical school, law school, and graduate programs in a variety of fields. The Japanese major requires twelve courses, and the Japanese minor requires six courses.

Journalism
Minor

The journalism minor requires six courses and emphasizes the practical aspects of the discipline of writing.

Latin-American Studies 
BA*, minor

The Latin-American studies minor can serve to complement the student’s major field of concentration by giving him or her a broad view of Latin American cultures and their relations to the United States and the rest of the world. Study abroad in a Latin American country is strongly encouraged. The Latin-American studies minor requires five courses.

* Pending final approval.

Legal Studies
Minor

The legal studies minor is designed to educate students in certain broadly relevant analytical skills, introduce students to what it means to study a social phenomenon from a variety of perspectives, and help students obtain a better understanding of law and the multiple functions it plays in a variety of societies. Students will develop their writing skills and have greater interaction among faculty interested in law and society.

Linguistics
BA, minor

The fundamental question of linguistics is, “How is it that by emitting streams of buzzing, popping, and hissing noises from our mouths, we human beings are able to transmit thoughts, intentions, and knowledge of the world from one mind to another?” The Department of Linguistics is uniquely situated to address this question from many viewpoints through close relationships with the departments of brain and cognitive sciences, computer science, philosophy, and American Sign Language. These relationships are fostered by the College’s Center for Language Sciences in the form of joint research, colloquia, shared facilities, and coursework. Similarly, the linguistics major draws on courses offered by other departments. Linguistics majors choose a track in one of these areas: phonology, syntax and semantics, historical linguistics, psycholinguistics, computational linguistics, or descriptive linguistics of specific languages. The goal is a “hands-on” experience where students learn what it’s like to actively participate in the creation of knowledge. The major can serve as a background for advanced studies in such disciplines as anthropology, communication, computer science, education, the speech and hearing sciences, languages, law, philosophy, psychology, and language, literacy, and culture.

Materials Science
Minor

The materials science minor requires four courses.

The Department of Mathematics is a research-oriented department preparing the next generation of engineers, scientists, and mathematicians for successful careers. Majors choose from degrees in mathematics, applied mathematics, or a joint major in mathematics and statistics. The University also offers a separate BA in statistics and a certificate in actuarial studies. The 22 full-time faculty members all hold PhDs in mathematics. One of the big advantages of Rochester’s mathematics program is the range and depth of undergraduate offerings beyond calculus, including courses of interest to non-majors. Undergraduates often challenge themselves with graduate courses in mathematics, and some pursue summer research opportunities, including programs with the National Science Foundation, the American Mathematical Society, and the Mathematical Association of America. Only a few mathematics majors plan to become academic research mathematicians. Most enjoy the fascination of mathematics and find the skills they acquire to be an excellent foundation for careers in the computer industry, actuarial work, industrial engineering, and business, as well as great preparation for law, medical, and graduate schools.

Applied Mathematics
BS

The applied mathematics major is for students with a special interest in applications. The applied mathematics major requires six foundational courses and nine core/advanced courses.

Mathematics
BA, BS, minor

The mathematics BA is the most flexible mathematics major and is very suitable for double majors or those who would like to design their own program. The department has tracks for those with interests in financial mathematics, teaching, mathematical biology, or actuarial science. The mathematics BS is for more serious math students. The mathematics BA requires four foundational courses and eight core/advanced courses. The mathematics BS requires four foundational courses and eleven core/advanced courses. The mathematics minor requires four foundational courses and three core/advanced courses.

Mathematics & Statistics
BA

The Department of Mathematics and the Programs in Statistics offer a joint mathematics and statistics major. The mathematics and statistics major requires fourteen courses.

Medieval & Early Modern Studies
Minor

The medieval and early modern studies minor enables students to pursue a program in the historical and cultural production of Europe and the Mediterranean from the fall of the Roman Empire and the rise of Islam to the mid-seventeenth century. This period comprises distinct thematic continuities understood to be post-classical and pre-Enlightenment and it is intended to be multidisciplinary.

Music
BA, minor

Music is an integral part of the University’s personality, with at least 25 percent of the undergraduates taking part in music through ensembles, classes, and free studio lessons (even for non-majors). While shuttle buses make the Eastman School very accessible, the Department of Music on the River Campus is well known for its strengths in music history, theory, and popular music. In fact, the department chair is a rock historian who recently launched the Institute for Popular Music—something you won’t find at any other school in the country. The BA program offers several tracks, such as composition, performance, musical theater, and more. The professors are all distinguished, internationally known scholars in their fields, yet are also very accessible.

Music & Linguistics
Minor

The Music and Sound Initiative is a new collaboration between the University’s College of Arts, Sciences, and Engineering and the Eastman School of Music. The music and linguistics minor requires six courses and is a social science.

Music Cognition
Minor

The Music and Sound Initiative is a new collaboration between the University’s College of Arts, Sciences, and Engineering and the Eastman School of Music. The music cognition minor requires six courses and is a natural science.

Ethics
Minor

The ethics minor consists five courses in ethics and related areas.

History of Philosophy
Minor

The history of philosophy minor requires five courses in the history of philosophy.

Philosophy
BA, minor

The Department of Philosophy focuses on Western philosophy. However, it has an interdisciplinary approach that leads to some unusual collaborations, such as the Darwin and Religion course, co-taught by professors from the philosophy and biology departments. Pre-med students appreciate that Rochester’s philosophy department has two faculty members who work in biomedical ethics, allowing them to round out their pre-med studies with humanistic perspectives on medicine and bioethical issues. It should come as no surprise, then, that in addition to epistemology, the strengths of Rochester’s philosophy department include ethics and the history and philosophy of science. The faculty is devoted equally to teaching and research, and is highly accessible, welcoming students to discuss their interests or to propose independent studies. Philosophy majors recently held internships in law offices, public schools, international agencies, and social services. There is also a Philosophy and Teaching Internship in conjunction with the Rochester City School District. Philosophy majors are highly valued by law, medical, and business schools, and throughout the private sector. Many graduates go into scientific research, social science, policy, teaching, and other fields.

Philosophy of Science
Minor

The philosophy of science minor requires five courses in philosophy of science.

Astronomy
Minor

For admission to a minor in astronomy, a student must attain an average of at least a 2.0 in all the introductory 100 level astronomy, physics, and mathematics courses. The astronomy minor requires seven courses.

Physics
BA, BS, minor

The Department of Physics and Astronomy (PAS) combines the best features of a small, liberal arts college and a major research university. This moderately sized department has an accessible, award-winning faculty dedicated to excellence in teaching. Students major in either physics (BA, BS) or physics and astronomy (BA, BS), and the department can help them combine their interest with a second major or with pre-med, pre-law, or teacher certification programs. PAS has conducted internationally recognized research in most major subfields of physics and astronomy. They believe the best instruction in physics is given by those pursuing research, and the best training in physics happens when students experience research for themselves. The NSF-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program helps PAS students conduct projects with research groups in the University’s Laboratory for Laser Energetics and the Mees Observatory, as well as in local and national laboratories. PAS graduates can apply their degrees toward careers in basic research, education, industry, computer science, medicine, communication, publishing, environmental science, consulting, law, business, engineering, and space and earth sciences.

Physics & Astronomy
BA, BS

The Department of Physics and Astronomy (PAS) combines the best features of a small, liberal arts college and a major research university. This moderately sized department has an accessible, award-winning faculty dedicated to excellence in teaching. Students major in either physics (BA, BS) or physics and astronomy (BA, BS), and the Department can help them combine their interest with a second major or with pre-med, pre-law, or teacher certification programs. PAS has conducted internationally recognized research in most major subfields of physics and astronomy. They believe the best instruction in physics is given by those pursuing research, and the best training in physics happens when students experience research for themselves. The NSF-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program helps PAS students conduct projects with research groups in the University’s Laboratory for Laser Energetics and the Mees Observatory, as well as in local and national laboratories. PAS graduates can apply their degrees toward careers in basic research, education, industry, computer science, medicine, communication, publishing, environmental science, consulting, law, business, engineering, and space and earth sciences.

Political science faculty are widely recognized for their research and have won awards for their teaching. The department is well known for its quantitative work, and many students collaborate with faculty on their research. However, the department also features fascinating internships with the British and European parliaments, as well as the Washington Semester Program in DC. All political science faculty members teach undergraduate and graduate courses small enough for students to have real interaction with their professors. Graduates of the program often head to law school, business school, or other graduate programs, while others pursue teaching or programs in public policy.

International Relations
BA, minor

The major in International Relations introduces students to the complex and fascinating world of politics beyond the United States and provides them with essential tools for understanding and analyzing it. International relations majors are required to participate in a study abroad program, and Rochester offers more than 70 options worldwide. The international relations major requires twelve courses, and the international relations minor requires six courses.

Political Science
BA, minor

The political science major requires twelve courses, and the political science minor requires five courses.

Clinical Psychology 
Minor

The clinical psychology minor satisfies a social science divisional requirement and requires five courses.

Health Psychology 
Minor

The health psychology minor satisfies a social science divisional requirement and requires six courses.

Organizational Psychology 
Minor

The organizational psychology minor satisfies a social science divisional requirement and requires five courses.

Psychology 
BAminor

The Department of Clinical and Social Sciences in Psychology (CSP) offers a BA in psychology (the science of behavior and mental life), including a research-based honors option. The program covers theoretical, empirical, and technical presentations of psychology as both a social and a natural science. This overlap is reflected in the teaching relationship between CSP, which focuses on social science courses, and the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, which teaches courses representing psychology as a natural science. CSP research represents three key areas: motivation, developmental psychopathology, and interpersonal relationships. CSP encourages students to take active roles in faculty research, the Psychology Undergraduate Council, and Psi Chi, the international honor society in psychology. Locally, CSP is associated with the Mt. Hope Family Center, which integrates research, training, and treatment in developmental psychopathology. CSP majors may tailor their programs to provide excellent background for postgraduate work in psychology, medicine, education, social work, law, business, and related social and natural sciences, and occupations in business and human services.

Psychology as a Natural Science 
Minor

The psychology as a natural science minor satisfies a natural science divisional requirement and requires five courses.

Psychology as a Social Science 
Minor

The psychology as a social science minor satisfies a social science divisional requirement requires five courses.

Social & Emotional Development 
Minor

The social and emotional development minor satisfies a social sciences divisional requirement requires five courses.

Public Health Programs

Public health-related majors and minors provide an opportunity for students to engage their interests in community health from diverse perspectives including natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Collectively, they benefit from the existing strengths of the College and the adjacent Medical Center, including opportunities for undergraduate research. A public health-related major can easily integrate with an interest in the health professions, such as medical or dental school. However, you’ll also be prepared for immediate careers or graduate study, including anthropology, biostatistics, epidemiology, law, medical humanities, medical sociology, philosophy, psychology, public health, and statistics.

Bioethics 
BAminor

The bioethics major provides students with the tools to think about the major ethical and related legal questions that arise in medicine and public health. Bioethics majors get a strong background in the history of public health and in relevant concepts necessary to assess population health and think about ethical questions. Students will understand the frameworks in which individual moral decisions should be made, the frameworks in which social and political moral decisions should be made, and the most important controversies in bioethics. Students will also develop the tools to analyze moral arguments in bioethics and to construct arguments that contribute to some of these debates. The bioethics major satisfies the humanities requirement and requires thirteen courses.

Epidemiology 
BAminor

Epidemiology students will understand the theories, concepts, and skills required to assess population health, will be familiar with methodologies used to examine factors associated with the development and prevention of disease, and will develop the basic tools necessary for analysis of data applicable to public health outcomes. The epidemiology major satisfies the social science requirement and requires fifteen courses and two foundational courses. The epidemiology minor requires six courses.

Health, Behavior, & Society 
BAminor

Health, behavior, and society students will understand the psychological and societal structures and mechanisms affecting human health behavior, and that health and disease do not depend uniquely on biological mechanisms, but include societal and cultural influences as well. Students will also understand that psychological and behavioral factors affect human health and interact with surrounding economics and environmental conditions. Students will understand the role of behavioral theory, research, and clinical practice in the promotion and maintenance of physical health and well-being. The health, behavior, and society major satisfies the social science requirement and requires twelve courses and two foundational courses. The health, behavior, and society minor requires six courses.

Health Policy 
BAminor

The health policy major satisfies the social science requirement and requires thirteen courses and four foundational courses. Health policy students will understand health policy as it relates to the organization, financing, and provision of health care in the US, and the current situation relating to population health, private insurance, long-term care, and mental health. Students will learn how the principles of statistics, economics, and political science apply to health policy and how to apply the principles of health policy analysis to population health, private insurance, long-term care, and mental health. The health policy minor requires six courses.

The Department of Religion and Classics is unique for combining the study of religion and the study of classics into a single department that includes a classicist who studies Roman religion and another scholar who focuses on medieval Islamic mystical poetry. The faculty is accessible, accomplished, well published, and four members of the department have won major teaching awards. One professor even teaches a popular course, Speaking Stones, about gravestones and architecture, taught right in Mt. Hope Cemetery, adjacent to campus. Most religion and classics graduates go on to medical, law, or graduate school, half have more than one major, and many choose to submit an honors thesis.

Arabic
Minor

The Arabic minor requires six courses of close textual analysis and interpretation, chosen from a wide range of Arabic texts, and read in the original language.

Classics
BA, minor

The classics major is language-centered. Course work in Greek and Latin is supplemented by studies in ancient literature, religion, philosophy, history, and art. The goal of the classics concentration is to be able to analyze and interpret significant texts in the ancient languages and to understand their cultural context. Students may chose a concentration in classics (both languages), or in Greek or Latin alone; all majors, however, are encouraged to take at least one year of each language, if possible. The classics major requires eleven courses, and the classics minor requires six courses.

Greek
Minor

The Greek minor requires six courses.

Jewish Studies
Minor

The Jewish studies minor requires six courses.

Latin
Minor

The Latin minor requires six courses.

Religion
BA, minor

The goal of a concentration in religion is to achieve an understanding of the nature of diverse religions, the methods employed in their study, and a measure of competence with a specific tradition or area. Seminars, reading courses, study abroad options, and the senior tutorial allow intensive study of particular topics. Students also may enroll in selected courses at Colgate Rochester Divinity School/Bexley Hall/Crozer Theological Seminary and take advantage of its distinguished theological library. The religion major requires ten courses and the religion minor requires six courses.

Russian
BA, minor

The Russian major is an excellent option for students interested in architecture, art history, European studies, film studies, history, international relations, literature, political science, and religion. Russian majors generally study abroad in Russia for a summer or a semester. The Russian major requires nine courses, and the Russian minor requires five courses.

Russian Studies
BA, minor

The Russian studies major is an excellent option for students interested in the humanities or social sciences, such as art history, economics, European studies, film studies, history, international relations, literature, political science, and religion. Russian studies incorporates the perspective of several departments and the linguistic, historical and cultural background needed to understand Russia’s past, to analyze its present, and to make responsible predictions about its future. The Russian studies major requires nine courses, and the Russian studies minor requires five courses.

Spanish
BA, minor

The Spanish major is an excellent option for students interested in art history, business, film studies, history, Latin-American studies, literature, music, and religion. Spanish majors generally study abroad in a Spanish-speaking country for a summer or a semester. Spanish majors have gone on to graduate programs in law, medicine, business, Spanish, education, and history. Graduates work in international business, government, and non-governmental organizations. The Spanish major requires eleven courses, and the Spanish minor requires five courses.

Statistics 
BAminor

The Program in Statistics offers a BA degree in statistics and a joint BA in mathematics and statistics in conjunction with the Department of Mathematics. The major in statistics combines six to eight courses in statistics with two to four courses in an allied field, such as economics, mathematics, biology, psychology, or political science. Some statistics courses are required for Rochester’s Actuarial Sciences and Management Studies Certificates, and some advanced courses are taught for both graduate and undergraduate students. Statistics graduates have been successfully employed at the US Bureau of the Census; US Departments of Agriculture, Energy, and Labor; Eastman Kodak Company; and pharmaceutical and insurance companies. Some statistics majors pursue graduate programs in statistics, economics, mathematics, political science, and psychology, and others join MD or MBA programs.

Studio Arts
BA, minor

The Department of Art and Art History is dedicated to liberal education in the creation and historical study of the visual arts. Through its BA program in studio arts, students explore form, space, and function using traditional media and new technologies in the creation of two- and three-dimensional art. The camera, canvas, and computer supply only a few means of studio production. Any material or approach is possible. The University’s Sage Art Center is where art is produced, analyzed, and exhibited. It provides access to all the materials, supportive resources, and faculty and staff necessary for a rich studio experience. One of the department’s distinctive features is the Art New York program, which offers students the chance to work and study in New York City and understand how art is produced, collected, and presented. Rochester also offers the European Arts Internship, with opportunities to work in such landmarks as the Victoria and Albert Museum and the Museum of London. Internships can also be arranged in Paris, Brussels, Bonn, and Madrid.

Sustainability
Minor

The sustainability minor is intentionally interdisciplinary and includes core classes from the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. The minor allows for three additional electives chosen from the sciences or social sciences (at least one science elective is required). The goal of the minor is to provide a curriculum that encourages students to learn to communicate and to solve problems of societal relevance that straddle disciplinary boundaries in sustainability and global change.

Theatre
BA*, minor, concentration

The theatre minor requires a minimum of six courses. It developed in conjunction with Rochester’s International Theatre Program. The theatre concentration requires at least twelve courses.

* Pending final approval.

Research in Visual Science
Minor

The research in visual science minor requires two regular courses, a special independent study in contemporary vision science, and two semesters of research in a CVS faculty member’s lab.

Visual Science
Minor

The visual science minor requires five courses in visual science.

Women’s Studies
BA, minor

Without question, Susan B. Anthony is one of the most important figures in both American history and in the history of the University of Rochester itself. The Susan B. Anthony Institute for Gender and Women’s Studies is named to honor the nineteenth-century suffragist who led a successful campaign to have women admitted to the University of Rochester in 1900. Rochester’s BA in women’s studies is an interdisciplinary program that focuses on the experiences of diverse groups of women, and analyzes the changing cultural, economic, political, and psychological relations between women and men. The institute is supported by more than one hundred faculty associates who represent a broad range of disciplines in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Women’s studies majors can tailor their program with either a humanities or social science focus, and students seeking additional rigor can complete an honors thesis. The institute offers grants to support undergraduate research in gender and women’s studies, and many local organizations and companies offer internships.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

Actuarial Studies

Students interested in the certificate in actuarial studies are usually contemplating a career in the insurance industry. The program is supervised by a faculty committee of representatives from the Departments of Statistics, Mathematics, and Economics. Ordinarily, interested students should apply by spring semester of their junior year. The actuarial studies certificate requires eight courses.

Asian Studies

The Asian studies certificate is designed to permit students concentrating in the social sciences and humanities to develop knowledge of Asian cultures and languages as a complement to their disciplinary concentration. The Asian studies certificate requires ten courses.

Biophysics

The biophysics certificate is designed to provide students with the fundamentals necessary for applying physical principles to problems in biology or medicine, whether it be in the context of future graduate study or employment. The biophysics certificate requires seven courses.

Biotechnology

The biotechnology certificate is designed to give students the background needed for entry into biotechnology and for advanced study, and it gives recognition for specialization in the field. The biotechnology certificate requires eight courses.

Leadership

The leadership certificate offers students the opportunity to develop their leadership skills through “leadership experiences” that combine specific academic study with specific practical application. Students must successfully complete at least three different leadership experiences.

Literary Translation Studies

The literary translation studies certificate provides students with an opportunity to study the theory and practice of literary translation through coursework in international literature, advanced literary studies, translation, language arts, and the art and craft of writing. The literary translation studies certificate requires seven courses.

Mathematical Modeling in Political Science & Economics

The mathematical modeling in political science and economics certificate allows students to use mathematical techniques in fields like political science, economics, business, and psychology. The mathematical modeling in political science and economics certificate requires nine to ten courses.

Medphysics

The medphysics certificate is designed to provide students with the fundamentals necessary for applying physical principles to problems in biology or medicine, whether it be in the context of future graduate study or employment. The medphysics certificate requires seven courses.

Polish & Central European Studies

The Polish and Central European studies certificate provides students with an opportunity to develop an interdisciplinary knowledge about Poland and Central Europe. The Polish and Central European studies certificate requires ten courses.

Stage Management

The stage management certificate is designed for students serious about pursuing a career path or an interest in stage management for the theatre. The stage management certificate requires one prerequisite course and eight core courses.